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patients with the same name

Nurses General Nursing

Published Apr 19, 2010

  • by jorjaRN Specializes in orthopedics, telemetry, PCU.

What is everyone's experience with facility policy on patient with the same name? The last place I worked every effort was made not to even have patients with the same last name on the same floor, but if unavoidable, they were put as far away from each other as possible so that thier meds would be on different carts, etc.

Last night I had a patient, let's call him John Patient, in room 5, and about halfway through the shift, we got an admission with the name John Patient. Exact same name, first and last . And they put him in room 7. Our charge nurse informed the coordinater that we already had a patient with the name, but I think her reaction was pretty much, "oh well, deal with it". I wasn't assigned the new patient, but obviously when I went to get meds out of the Pixis the names were right next to each other, and their med drawers in the cart were literally on top of each other. I just felt like it was an accident waiting to happen.

This is a pretty small hospital, with only a couple of med-surg floors, and it hasn't been rare to have patients with the same (common) last names on the floor, but I thought this was pretty extreme. I'm wondering if the hospital would have had any responsibility if an error were to occur, since I feel like it would be in part a systems error if someone pulled the wrong med or something. Obviously that's why we check more than one patient identifier, but we all know that mistakes unfortunately happen even under the best circumstances.

In any event, I'm hoping at least one of them will be discharged before I'm back on the floor in a couple of days.

Just wondering what your thoughts/experiences were.

Visit GCU

  • + Add a Comment

Penelope_Pitstop

Penelope_Pitstop, BSN, RN

2,365 Posts

Can't say that I've ever had a patient with the same first AND last names on the same floor, but my hospital is similar to yours in that we try to space patients with the same or similar surnames out on the floor if we cannot move one to a different department.

It sounds like a recipe for disaster. Remember your TWO unique identifiers. If everyone does that, potential errors are reduced quite a bit, but I worry about what happens when people call to speak to "the nurse for Mr. Parent," ("Which Mr. Parent?" "Oh, Mr. John Parent." "Hmm, WHICH Mr. John Parent?") whetn doctors pick up the wrong chart, when (God forbid), one dies...

There must be some way to get one of those gentleman on a different floor! Even swaps exist for a reason, even if they're an inconvenience. (I've got a COPD'r over here, can we trade for one of YOUR COPD'rs?) Safety is more important!

gtoko

As the previous poster stated, remember your two unique identifiers. Also, a name alert.

Good idea about swapping pats also.

brownbook

3,413 Posts

We have bright yellow name alert bracelets the patients wear, in addition to their regular bracelet, and yellow stickers that say name alert we put every where on their chart, door to their room, etc.

bill4745

bill4745, RN

We put up signs in appropriate (eg med room) but private (watch HIPAA!) areas that warn staff of similar names.

Meriwhen

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

4 Articles; 7,907 Posts

The record on my unit is 4 patients with the same first name--2 of those shared the same last initial. This got confusing since on the outside of the charts and on the boards, we list them by first names only. We used a lot of name alert tags and asked for birthdates at every med pass. Never had someone with two entirely identical names though.

Maybe your two patients have different middle intials--if they do, you can use that to help tell them apart.

tewdles, RN

3,156 Posts

I have never had it happen in the hospital but when I worked in community health we frequently had patients who had the same first and last names and often the same middle initial. We had 3 young boys, all with the same first and last names AND 2 of them even had the same birthday. Given that we were working with the migrant hispanic community, we used the mother's maiden name to ID them.

No matter what, you have to have at least 2 unique identifiers...dangerous possibilities...

JulieCVICURN

JulieCVICURN, BSN, RN

It's happened to me recently too, and to make matters worse, I work in a CVICU, so not only did they have the same name but also the same diagnosis, were only 2 years apart in age, and had the same primary physician AND cardiologist. Both were scheduled for the exact same test at different times the next day. I had both patients, simply because I was called in to take them both as admits and they had come in to the ER at relatively the same time. Before we realized they had the same name we almost made them roommates because our floor was so full, but ended up moving a patient just so we could split them up! It was a hairy night for me, and in the morning we made sure to split them up and give them to two different nurses. And of course, we put stickers on the charts and everything that said "NAME ALERT".

SouthernPoint

SouthernPoint

i have personal had to deal with this as a charge nurse and floor nurse. here is how i would deal with it.

as charge nurse:

1 - i will try my hardest to have the patients as far away from each other as possible (that is, if i am giving the bed to the house supervisor).

2 - i will never give a nurse both of these patients. there were many times i have came into work and the night charge nurse assigned both patients to the same nurse. if i am not able to switch things around. then i will take the patient and i have a handful of times.

3 - put a note (name alert) on the medication cart/pyxis or what ever delivering system your work place has. this way it draws attention and everyone will notice.

4 - make sure you let both nurse's know about the double patient name's. have them always double check everything given during their shift. i know it's a pain in the butt, but so are writing up incident reports.

as a floor nurse.

1 - i will make sure that there is a note in the medication room/pyxis.

2 - i will get with the nurse who has the other patient and talk with them about having 2 patients with the same/almost the same name.

3 - i will double check everything i am giving to my patient with either another floor nurse or the charge nurse.

4 - without violating any type of hippa issue's. i talk with my patient and explain that it's very important, but i am going to have to ask them their date of birth (our mar's have the patient's dob on them) each time they are to receive medication or testing. i have never had any issue's with this, and many patients state they are grateful that i am taking that extra step for safety.

i hope this might give you some idea's on how to handle issue's like this.

jorjaRN

Thanks so much for all your responses! If they're still both there the next time I work, I'll definitely make sure that some of these steps are in place.

I personally check name, date of birth and record number when I give meds on any of my patients, and I'm sure that the other nurses on my floor will be extra careful with these two patients, but I'm wondering, if something were to happen, would the hospital have any additional liability for creating this situation in the first place? There were definitely places in the hospital that the second patient could have been put.

cherrybreeze

cherrybreeze, ADN, RN

1,405 Posts

i have personal had to deal with this as a charge nurse and floor nurse. here is how i would deal with it. as charge nurse: 1 - i will try my hardest to have the patients as far away from each other as possible (that is, if i am giving the bed to the house supervisor). 2 - i will never give a nurse both of these patients. there were many times i have came into work and the night charge nurse assigned both patients to the same nurse. if i am not able to switch things around. then i will take the patient and i have a handful of times. 3 - put a note (name alert) on the medication cart/pyxis or what ever delivering system your work place has. this way it draws attention and everyone will notice. 4 - make sure you let both nurse's know about the double patient name's. have them always double check everything given during their shift. i know it's a pain in the butt, but so are writing up incident reports. as a floor nurse. 1 - i will make sure that there is a note in the medication room/pyxis. 2 - i will get with the nurse who has the other patient and talk with them about having 2 patients with the same/almost the same name. 3 - i will double check everything i am giving to my patient with either another floor nurse or the charge nurse. 4 - without violating any type of hippa issue's. i talk with my patient and explain that it's very important, but i am going to have to ask them their date of birth (our mar's have the patient's dob on them) each time they are to receive medication or testing. i have never had any issue's with this, and many patients state they are grateful that i am taking that extra step for safety. i hope this might give you some idea's on how to handle issue's like this.

it is our policy to ask for a patient's last name and birthdate every time we give a med, regardless. i do believe it will help in this case, but we would be doing that anyway.

thanks so much for all your responses! if they're still both there the next time i work, i'll definitely make sure that some of these steps are in place. i personally check name, date of birth and record number when i give meds on any of my patients, and i'm sure that the other nurses on my floor will be extra careful with these two patients, but i'm wondering, if something were to happen, would the hospital have any additional liability for creating this situation in the first place? there were definitely places in the hospital that the second patient could have been put. thanks!

i don't think that can be answered definitively. it would vary with every case. if it came down to a lawsuit, it would depend on the lawyers, the judge, the day. one judge/jury might find that the hospital itself had some liability in not placing them in different locations (but by saying hospital, you would still have to narrow it down....who would have made the choice not to split them up? it comes down to someone). another might find that even though they were close together, ultimately it is the nurses' responibility to make sure they are giving the correct meds to the correct patient, since they (obviously) should be doing that anyway. having patients with the same name does increase the risk of errors, but if staff is following the 5 rights, checking birthdates, etc, the risk should be minimized.

i think that it also would help to have the patients aware (if they are oriented enough) of what meds they take, and make sure the nurse bringing in their meds tells them specifically what they are giving them, as opposed to "your morning pills," "your evening pills," "your blood pressure pill," "your pain pill," etc. if the patient hears the name of a med they aren't familiar with, or know they haven't taken before, that would raise a flag as well. of course, i realize that not all patients are going to be capable of this, but for those that are, it could be useful. even giving the patient a written list of what meds they take and when, and updating it as things are added/removed, would aid in this process and not violate hipaa (as it wouldn't be posted anywhere).

what ever you do. do not let yourself get into that situation. trust me, if the pooh hit's the fan. it's gonna splatter and make one heck of a mess and the hospital will use you to clean up the mess.

By using the site, you agree with our Policies . X

The Importance of Being Identified by the Patient Care Team with Two Forms of Identification

Identifying patients accurately and matching the patient’s identity with the correct treatment or service is a critical factor of patient safety.

Common "Wrong patient" errors

The most common “wrong patient” treatment error many people may first think of is that of a patient receiving a medication that was intended for another patient. However, wrong patient medication errors can occur for a variety of reasons—and during any point—in a patient encounter.

Patient identification mistakes can lead to errors in medication administration, incompatible blood transfusion reactions, failure to treat a serious illness or disease, medical treatment for erroneous diagnostic lab results, and procedures being performed on the wrong patient.

To prevent instances of misidentification and near-misses, The Joint Commission requires that two identifiers—such as a patient’s full name, date of birth and/or medical identification (ID) number —be used for every patient encounter.

Every patient, every time

Reduce harmful outcomes from avoidable patient identification errors: Do-the-2. Verify two patient identifiers—every patient, every time.

Many patients identify themselves by their middle name or a nickname instead of the name on their patient record. If a caregiver were to assume they have the correct patient based on the name the patient uses versus their legal name, it could create a serious and potentially life-threatening problem when it comes to treatments or procedures.

Likewise, if a patient has the same name as another patient, as in the case of Kimberly Young and Kimberly Young (pictured below), or patients who share names with people in their family and omit the proper suffix (e.g. a Junior or Senior designation), there is also a risk of misidentification. The practice of engaging the patient in identifying themselves and using two patient identifiers (full name, date of birth and/or medical ID number) is essential in improving the reliability of the patient identification process.

you are assigned to patients with the same name

  • Health Care
  • UTMB Support Areas

1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients:  ...

1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients:

Patient's room number

Patient's diagnosis

Patient's bed number

2-identifiers (name ad/or date of birth)

Clear selection

2.  You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be:

Check the ID bracelet for ID number assigned upon admission.

Identify information in patient's chart

Just give any medications or treatments as prescribed and hope you have the right patient

Call patient's name and check ID bracelet.

3.  What is a leading cause of death in elderly and children:

4.  What is the universal sign for choking:

Clutching right side of chest

Clutching right

Grabbing throat with one or two hands

5.  You walk into Mr. Rosa's after his lunch tray was delivered. You observe him clutching his throat and having difficulty talking. What action should you take:

Pat him on his back

Position behind him and begin abdominal thrust

Offer him a glass of water

Lay the patient down and attempt to dislogde what is in his throat

6.  The acroynm R. A. C. E. stands for:

Run, Alarm, Contain, Emergency

Rescue, Alarm, Confine, Extinquish

Rescue, Awake, Confine, Extinquish

Race. Alarm, Combust, Exit

7.  When using a fire extinquishers P.A.S.S. stands for:

Pass, Alarm, Squeeze, Sweep

Pull, Aim, Squeeze, Sweep

Push Aim, Sweep, Squeeze

Pull, Aim, Sweep, Squeeze

8.  You are assisting a patient with shaving with an electric shaver. Your first action should be:

Inspect shaver and blades

Turn on shaver

Lather patient's face with shaving cream

Hand the patient a mirror in order for him to see what you are doing

9.  Your patient is wearing a yellow wristband. This is a indication of what:

High risk of allergies

High risk of falls

A stroke patient

10.  To ensure the patient is safe before transferring to a stretcher. You should first:

Raise side rails

Lock the wheels

Move the patient's head to the stretcher first

Ask the patient to roll on his side with rails down

11.  A transfer belt is used to:

Support a unsteady or disabled patient

Support the patient's back

Helps relieve back pain

Help patient to walk

12.  When do most falls occur:

In the hallway

Doing physical therapy

Patients bathroom and room

13.  Mr. Ross is a high fall risk and you are helping him get dressed. You should ensure he has:   Select all that apply

  • He has on non-skid socks or shoes
  • He has not had any medication that might make him drowsy

His clothes are too big

  • The bed is in the lowest position

14.  When using a transfer belt it should be placed:

Over the patient's shoulder

Around the patient's chest

Around the patient's waist

Around both arms

15.  You have a doctor's order for restraints. You should check the resraints position every:

Every 20 minutes

Every 30 minutes

Every 15 minutes

Every 1hour

16.  HAI stands for:

Home-health associated infection

Healthcare associated infection

None of the above

17.  Mr. Jay is post kidney transplant. What is the patient at highest risk for:

18.  Mr. Johnson is admitted to your floor with a diagnoses of Tuberculosis. What standard precautions should be used noted:

19.  Ms. Gray is one of your patient and is very worried about contracting COVID while hospitalized. You explain to her that preventing transmission of infection starts with. Select all that apply:

Hand hygiene

Wearing PPE

Staff not wearing masks

20.  A patient on isolation precautions:

To prevent infection transmission

Patient wants a private room

Destroys pathogens

21.  The patient bed is in the Fowler's position:

Head of the bed is at a 45 degree angle

Head of bed is at a 90 degree angle

Head of the bed is flat

22, A patient's skin rubbing against the bed sheets is called:

Pressure injury

23.  When a patient is recieving an enema the nozzle is inserted:

3 to 4 inches

2 to 4 inches

5 to 6 inches

6 to 8 inches

24.  Mr. Jones ask how often his ostomy bag should be emptied:

Every shift

Every 4 o 6 hours

Every 2 to 4 hours

25.  The ostomy pouch shoiuld be changed:

Every 2 to 5 days

Every 3 to 7 days

Every 5 days

Answer & Explanation

The practice of engaging the patient in identifying themselves and using two patient identifiers (full name, date of birth and/or medical ID number) is essential in improving the reliability of the patient identification process.

The practice of engaging the patient in identifying themselves and using two patient identifiers (full name, date of birth and/or medical ID number) is essential in improving the reliability of the patient identification process. Identifying the patient using the patients medical ID number is necessary. Each patient has unique medical ID number even if the patient has the same name or date of birth.

According to CDC, Fall is the leading cause of accidents/injury which leads to death among elderly and children.

The universal distress signal for choking is grabbing the throat with one or both hands . DO NOT perform first aid if the person is coughing forcefully and able to speak - a strong cough can dislodge the object on its own.

The Heimlich maneuver is a first aid procedure used when a person is choking . If you are alone and you are choking, you can try to dislodge the item in your throat or windpipe by performing the Heimlich maneuver on yourself

6.  The acronym R. A. C. E. stands for:

Rescue, Alarm, Confine, Extinguish

R = RESCUE anyone in immediate danger from the fire, if it does not endanger your own life. 

A = ALARM/ ALERT by activating the fire alarm system.

C = CONFINE the fire by closing all doors and windows. 

E = EXTINGUISH the fire with a fire extinguisher or EVACUATE if the fire is too large.

7.  When using a fire extinguishers P.A.S.S. stands for:

It's easy to remember how to use a fire extinguisher if you can remember the acronym PASS, which stands for Pull, Aim, Squeeze, and Sweep . 

Pull the pin. This will allow you to discharge the extinguisher. 

Aim at the base of the fire. If you aim at the flames (which is frequently the temptation), the extinguishing agent will fly right through and do no good. You want to hit the fuel.

Squeeze the top handle or the lever . This depresses a button that releases the pressurized extinguishing agent in the extinguisher.

Sweep side to side until the fire is completely out.

Rationale: 

Electric razor is safer compared to a traditional/standard razor with a double blade. Handing the patient with a mirror in order for him to see what you are doing secures cooperation.

Yellow means FALL RISK - We want to prevent falls at all times. Nurses review patients to determine if you need help when getting up or walking. Sometimes, a patient may become weak or confused during their illness. When you have this color-coded alert, all staff will know that you need help to prevent a fall.

Before patient transfer from bed to stretcher, wheels of the bed must be locked to stabilize the bed and prevents movement during transfer which may compromise the patient's safety.

A gait belt or transfer belt is a device put on a patient who has mobility issues, by a caregiver prior to that caregiver moving the patient . 

Cases of fall usually occurs at the patient's bathroom or room where most of the time, patients were left alone.

Non-skid socks or shoes provide comfort for the elderly and seniors, while helping them to remain more steady on their feet, especially on slippery surfaces. Medication that makes the patient drowsy should be withheld during ambulation to prevent unnecessary cases of fall. Bed should be at lowest position to prevent fall.

Transfer belts should be positioned low on the patient's waist . 

15.  You have a doctor's order for restraints. You should check the restraints position every:

Every 15 minutes (q15m) for the first hour, then every 30 minutes (q30m) to ensure proper circulation. Restraints are removed every 2 hours (q2h) for range of motion, toileting, and offer of fluids.

Healthcare associated infection 

HAI standards of healthcare associated infection can be associated with the devices used in medical procedures, such as catheters or ventilators. These healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) include central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, and ventilator-associated pneumonia .

Kidney transplant patients were at highest risk of acquiring infection. They are usually given with anti-rejection drugs to prevent organ rejection post kidney transplant. This medication also suppress the immune system putting them at risk of acquiring infection.

Tuberculosis is an airborne infection. Airborne precaution must be used as a transmission based precaution

Proper hand hygiene and wearing of proper PPE prevents further spread of COVID 19 infection

The purpose of isolation precautions is to prevent infection transmission between patients or patient to staff then staff to other patients.

Standard Fowler's position, also known as sitting position, is typically used for neurosurgery and should surgeries. The bed angle is between 45 degrees and 60 degrees.

Friction refers to rubbing the skin against a hard object, such as bed or the arm of the wheelchair. This rubbing causes heat, which can remove the top layer of the skin and often results in skin damage.

23.  When a patient is receiving an enema the nozzle is inserted:

The tip of the nozzle must be inserted gently into the anus, and continue inserting it 10 centimeters (3-4inches) into the rectum.

Every 4 to 6 hours

A person with an ostomy bag should be emptied about five or six time in a 24hour period (that is about 4-6 times daily)

25.  The ostomy pouch should be changed:

Patient with ostomy bag must be changed every 2-5 days.

Key references:

1. https://www.utmb.edu/health-resource-center/two-forms-of-identification#:~:text=The%20practice%20of%20engaging%20the,of%20the%20patient%20identification%20process.

2.https://www.cdc.gov/falls/data/fall-deaths.html#:~:text=Falls%20are%20the%20leading%20cause,fall%20death%20rate%20is%20increasing.

3. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100222_1.htm#:~:text=The%20universal%20distress%20signal%20for,the%20object%20on%20its%20own.

4. https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001983.htm

5. https://worldrescuers.com/what-does-the-acronym-race-stand-for-in-fire-safety/

6. https://www.sc.edu/ehs/training/Fire/08_howto.htm#:~:text=It's%20easy%20to%20remember%20how,the%20base%20of%20the%20fire.

7. https://www.wha.org/WisconsinHospitalAssociation/media/WHACommon/Health%20Care/PDFs/Wristband_Color_Codes.pdf

8. https://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/FallsPreventionCommittee/UsingAGaitBelt.pdf

9. Thttps://www.universalmedicalinc.com/mwdownloads/download/link/id/185#:~:text=Transfer%20belts%20should%20be%20positioned,girth%20is%20greater%20when%20sitting.

10.https://cna.plus/faq/promotion-of-safety/restraints-monitoring-removal/#:~:text=Every%2015%20minutes%20(q15m)%20for,toileting%2C%20and%20offer%20of%20fluids.

11. https://www.cdc.gov/hai/infectiontypes.html

12. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.steris.com/healthcare/knowledge-center/surgical-equipment/fowlers-position-guide%23:~:text%3DStandard%2520Fowler%27s%2520position%252C%2520also%2520known,%252C%2520chest%252C%2520and%2520shoulder%2520surgeries.&ved=2ahUKEwi47u3u57v8AhV_xjgGHWC6A-cQFnoECAwQBQ&usg=AOvVaw0j2kHL9kloSxZYK3xtIs5x

13. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325086#:~:text=Gently%20insert%20the%20tip%20of,the%20enema%20to%20take%20effect.

14. https://wtcs.pressbooks.pub/nursingfundamentals/chapter/10-4-pressure-injuries/#:~:text=Friction%20refers%20to%20rubbing%20the,often%20results%20in%20skin%20damage.

15. https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/conditions-services/colon-rectal-surgery/ostomy/guide-to-pouching-systems/how-to-use-a-pouching-system#:~:text=A%20person%20with%20an%20ileostomy,in%20a%2024%2Dhour%20period.

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Managing patients with identical names in the same ward

Affiliation.

  • 1 Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Tuen Mun Hospital, New Territories, Hong Kong, China.
  • PMID: 15819121
  • DOI: 10.1108/09526860510576938

Purpose: To review the experience of managing two patients with identical names in the same ward during a five-month period.

Design/methodology/approach: The records of the patients were reviewed to look for incorrect entries, errors in specimens sampling, administration of blood products and chemotherapy, and misplacement of clinical notes. Doctors and nurses involved were also invited to complete a questionnaire study to comment on the usefulness of the measures implemented for correct patient identification. A random sample of 60 patients was also selected to see if their full names were shared with other patients attending the same hospital.

Findings: Among the 1442 sheets of hospital records from the two patients, no errors pertaining to the clinical activities were found. However, 13 (0.9 per cent) sheets of the hospital records were misplaced. The 21 doctors and nurses participating in the questionnaire study gave positive support to all the additional measures implemented for safeguarding patient identification, of which the automated alerting feature in the electronic clinical management system received the highest scores. A total of 32 (53 per cent) of the 60 sampled patients shared a common full name with one to 101 other patients attending the same hospital.

Originality/value: Patients with identical names staying in the same ward present a unique challenge to acute health-care settings. The situation is especially relevant in communities where most people's names are not unique. Specific guidelines and measures are needed to prevent patient misidentification. Errors in filing of patient notes and laboratory reports to the hospital record deserve further attention.

Publication types

  • Case Reports
  • Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use
  • Hospital Units / standards*
  • Medical Errors / prevention & control*
  • Medical Records
  • Patient Identification Systems*
  • Safety Management / methods*
  • Antineoplastic Agents

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Interview highlights

How alabama's ruling that frozen embryos are 'children' could impact ivf.

Ailsa Chang

Headshot of Alejandra Marquez Janse.

Alejandra Marquez Janse

Justine Kenin headshot

Justine Kenin

you are assigned to patients with the same name

The decision stems from a case brought by three couples that had pursued in vitro fertilization treatment. Sang Tan/AP hide caption

The decision stems from a case brought by three couples that had pursued in vitro fertilization treatment.

Frozen embryos are people and you can be held legally responsible if you destroy them, according to a ruling by the Alabama Supreme Court on Friday .

The decision could have wide-ranging implications for in vitro fertilization clinics and for hopeful parents.

All Things Considered host Ailsa Chang speaks to UC Davis Professor of Law Mary Ziegler, who breaks down the possible downstream legal implication for how IVF is performed.

Abortion pills that patients got via telehealth and the mail are safe, study finds

Shots - Health News

Abortion pills that patients got via telehealth and the mail are safe, study finds.

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

Interview high lights

Ailsa Chang: Before we get to the actual ruling, can you just briefly explain the situation that led to the lawsuit, which was eventually brought to the state supreme court in Alabama?

Mary Ziegler: Absolutely. There were three couples that had pursued in vitro fertilization treatment at a clinic in Mobile, Alabama. And at a point in 2020, a hospital patient — the hospital was operated by the same clinic — entered the place where frozen embryos were stored, handled some of the embryos, burned his hand, dropped the embryos and destroyed them. And this led to a lawsuit from the three couples. They had a variety of theories in the suit, one of which was that the state's "wrongful death of a minor" law treated those frozen embryos as children or persons. And the Alabama Supreme Court agreed with them in this Friday decision.

Alabama Supreme Court rules frozen embryos are 'children' under state law

Alabama Supreme Court rules frozen embryos are 'children' under state law

Chang: It's worth noting that this lawsuit, it was a wrongful death lawsuit, meaning it was brought by couples who are mourning the accidental destruction of the embryos and wanting to hold someone responsible for that destruction. That said, what do you see as the wider-ranging or perhaps unintended consequences for IVF clinics in Alabama?

Ziegler: Well, if embryos are persons under this ruling, that could have pretty profound downstream complications for how IVF is performed. So, in IVF, generally more embryos are created than are implanted — they're stored, sometimes they're donated or destroyed, depending on the wishes of the people pursuing IVF. If an embryo is a person, it's obviously not clear that it's permissible to donate that embryo for research, or to destroy it. It may not even be possible to create embryos you don't implant in a particular IVF cycle.

So in other words, some anti-abortion groups argue that if an embryo was a person, every single embryo created has to be implanted, either in that person who's pursuing IVF, or some other person who "adopts the embryo." So as a result of that, it may radically change how IVF works, how cost effective it is, and how effective it is in allowing people to achieve their dream of parenthood.

'Something needs to change.' Woman denied abortion in South Carolina challenges ban

'Something needs to change.' Woman denied abortion in South Carolina challenges ban

Chang: Can you offer some examples, some expectations that you think we might see in how IVF providers in Alabama might change the way they operate?

Ziegler: Well, if Alabama IVF providers feel obligated to implant every embryo they create, that's likely to both reduce the chances that any IVF cycle will be successful. It also might make it a lot more expensive. IVF is already very expensive. I think the average being between about $15,000 and $20,000 per IVF cycle. Many patients don't succeed with IVF after one cycle. But if you were not allowed to create more than one embryo per cycle, that's likely to make IVF even more financially out of reach for people who don't have insurance coverage, and who struggle to pay that hefty price tag.

Chang: And what is the likelihood of this case heading to the U.S. Supreme Court?

Ziegler: It's pretty low, because of the way the Alabama Supreme Court framed its decision. It grounded very firmly in Alabama state constitutional law. And so I think this is the kind of ruling that could eventually have some reverberation at the U.S. Supreme Court, but it's very unlikely to be appealed directly to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Bayer makes a deal on popular contraceptive with Mark Cuban's online pharmacy

Bayer makes a deal on popular contraceptive with Mark Cuban's online pharmacy

Chang: If the ruling in this case was very much confined to Alabama state law, as you describe, what are the wider implications of this ruling for people who don't live in Alabama? What do you see?

Ziegler: I think there's been a broader strategy — the sort of next Roe v. Wade , if you will — for the anti-abortion movement. It is a recognition that a fetus or embryo is a person for all purposes, particularly for the purposes of the federal constitution. And while this isn't a case about the federal constitution, I think you'll see the anti-abortion movement making a gradual case that the more state courts — the more state laws — recognize a fetus or embryo as a person for different circumstances and reasons, the more compelling they can say is the case for fetal personhood under the constitution. The more compelling is their argument that a fetus is a rights holder and that liberal abortion laws or state abortion rights are impermissible.

  • Supreme Court

IMAGES

  1. Name Alert Two Patients With Same Name Fluorescent Chartreuse MAP1050

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

  2. Name Alert Two Patients With Same, Wrap-around Chart Label, 3" x 1

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

  3. LVN vs CNA vs MA: What Are the Differences?

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

  4. 5 New Patient Welcome Letter Templates for Primary Care Physicians

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

  5. Standardizing Last Names, Addresses Leads to Better Patient Matching

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

  6. Solved Case Scenario: You are assigned to care to a client

    you are assigned to patients with the same name

COMMENTS

  1. patients with the same name

    Apr 19, 2010 Can't say that I've ever had a patient with the same first AND last names on the same floor, but my hospital is similar to yours in that we try to space patients with the same or similar surnames out on the floor if we cannot move one to a different department. It sounds like a recipe for disaster. Remember your TWO unique identifiers.

  2. Two Forms of Identification

    Prevention To prevent instances of misidentification and near-misses, The Joint Commission requires that two identifiers—such as a patient's full name, date of birth and/or medical identification (ID) number —be used for every patient encounter. Every patient, every time

  3. What should the initial action be when you are assigned with

    Which of the following patients should be assigned an immediate (red tag) category? computer science. You can declare two variables with the same name as long as __. a. they appear within the same block. b. they are assigned different values . c. they are of different types. d. their scopes do not overlap. health.

  4. 1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients:

    The practice of engaging the patient in identifying themselves and using two patient identifiers (full name, date of birth and/or medical ID number) is essential in improving the reliability of the patient identification process. 2. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be: Answer:

  5. Question: Which method is most commonly use to identify patients:

    You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be: a- Check the ID bracelet for ID number assigned upon admission b- idemtify information in patient's chart c- Just give any medications or treatments as prescribed and hope you have the right patient d- Call patient's name and check ID bracelet. 3.

  6. 1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients:

    Question Answered step-by-step Asked by MagistrateTankGrasshopper12 1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients: Patient's room number Patient's diagnosis Patient's bed number -identifiers (name ad/or date of birth) 2. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be:

  7. Managing patients with identical names in the same ward

    Patients with identical names staying in the same ward present a unique challenge to acute health-care settings. The situation is especially relevant in communities where most people's names are not unique. Specific guidelines and measures are needed to prevent patient misidentification. Errors in f …

  8. PDF How to identify same-name patients to improve safety

    Figure 1. In any GP practice a proportion of patients will have the same or similar names; it is therefore helpful for the clinical system to warn the user when accessing the records of such patients clearly in the middle of the screen or on the patient home screen.

  9. How to identify same-name patients to improve safety

    It is important to have warnings in place for patients with the same or similar names in order to improve prescribing safety. Here, the author describes a method for identifying patients with the same name and generating a warning for when their record is accessed. Volume 24, Issue 18 19 September 2013 Pages 13-16 Related Information

  10. PDF Standards of Practice for Patient Identification, Correct Surgery Site

    asking a family member or designated representative the patient's name. (2) Verify the information on the patient's wristband is the same as the information in the patient's chart. (3) The patient's name and hospital-assigned identification number on the surgery schedule and transfer slip should correspond with the

  11. PDF 8 steps for making effective nurse-patient assignments

    This process involves assigning nurses and patients to areas. If you work in the emergency department (ED) or postanesthesia care unit (PACU), you likely make nurse-patient assignments this way. A nurse is assigned to an area, such as triage in the ED or Beds 1 and 2 in the PACU, and then patients are assigned to each area throughout the shift.

  12. Managing patients with identical names in the same ward

    Identify charts of patients with same or similar sounding names with the name in bold or italics [33] 2. Use two or more separate identifiers (Name, Date of Birth, Medical Record Number, etc) to ...

  13. PDF Log In ‹ Wiley Microsites

    Log In ‹ Wiley Microsites — WordPress

  14. . you are assigned two patients with the same name of john smith. what

    Final answer: When handling two patients with the same name, use additional identifiers, such as birth date or medical record numbers, to accurately distinguish them. This is crucial to prevent medical errors and ensure appropriate patient care. Explanation:

  15. Managing patients with identical names in the same ward

    Patients with identical names staying in the same ward present a unique challenge to acute health-care settings. The situation can especially relevant in communities where most people's names are not unique. Specific guidelines and measures are needed to eliminate patient improper. Errors into fluorine …

  16. Solved You are assigned two patients with the same name of

    Science Nursing Nursing questions and answers You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be:Rationale: Remmert, S. A. (2020). Mosby's Textbook For Nursing Assistants - Softcover Version. Mosby. This problem has been solved! You'll get a detailed solution that helps you learn core concepts.

  17. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith

    Dealing with patients who share the same name can create confusion and pose risks to patient safety. To address this situation, the following initial actions are recommended: 1.

  18. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What

    Health College verified answered • expert verified You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be: Rationale: Remmert, S. A. (2020). Mosby's Textbook For Nursing Assistants - Softcover Version. Mosby. Check the ID bracelet for ID number assigned upon admission.

  19. Shared Identity and the Doctor-Patient Relationship

    Studies have shown that health care professionals may view older patients, for example, as "offensive" and "demanding"; and patients who are clinically overweight or obese as "lazy, undisciplined, and weak-willed"; they are also less likely to view patients of low socioeconomic status as "intelligent, independent, responsible, or ...

  20. Mosby's Textbook for Nursing Assistants

    You should open the person's mail within 24 hours of it being delivered to the center. True. A resident complains about the food. The center must try to provide desired foods. False. Residents must provide some type of work for the center. True. Resident groups can discuss ideas for activity programs. False.

  21. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John smith what

    If you are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith, your initial action should be to confirm their individual identities by using their respective unique identifiers, such as the date of birth, medical record number, or address.

  22. 1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients: a. Patient's

    2. When assigned two patients with the same name, your initial action should bea. Check the ID bracelet for the ID number assigned upon admission. This is the most reliable way to confirm the patient's identity. 3. The leading cause of death in the elderly and children can vary based on geography and other factors.

  23. How Alabama's ruling that frozen embryos are 'children' could impact

    And at a point in 2020, a hospital patient — the hospital was operated by the same clinic — entered the place where frozen embryos were stored, handled some of the embryos, burned his hand ...

  24. 1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients: Patient's

    1. Which method is most commonly use to identify patients: Patient's room number Patient's diagnosis Patient's bed number -identifiers (name ad/or date of birth) 2. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What should your initial action be: Check the ID bracelet for ID number assigned upon admission.

  25. You are assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith. What

    Your initial action when assigned two patients with the same name of John Smith should be to check the ID bracelet for the ID number assigned upon admission. This is important for confirming the identity of the patient, ensuring that you are providing the correct treatments to the right individual. Verifying by name alone is not sufficient due ...