U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Here's how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Home

  •   Facebook
  •   Twitter
  •   Linkedin
  •   Digg
  •   Reddit
  •   Pinterest
  •   Email

Latest Earthquakes |    Live WebChat   Share Social Media  

Lesson Plans & Activities 9-12

Please see below for lessons and activities.

Biology/Ecosystems  ||  Geography  ||  Geology  ||  Global Change  ||  Natural Hazards  ||  Oceans/Coasts  ||  Water

Biology/Ecosystems

Wildlife and Contaminants - Lessons A series of lessons targeted to high school students that introduces the topic of ecotoxicology and guides students through the scientific process of gathering raw data and drawing conclusions about the impact of contaminants on wildlife.   

Become a Phenology Observer - Activity The National Phenology Network (sponsored by the USGS) is looking for volunteers to help monitor plant and animal species found across the United States. Learn how to monitor plant and animal phenology and sign up to contribute new observations to the national phenology database. Make this a classroom project!

Lessons on the Lake: An Educator's Guide to the Pontchartrain Basin - Lessons Louisiana's Lake Pontchartrain Basin is home to 1.5 million people and an estuary ecosystem with enormous biodiversity. Activities in the educator's guide help students in grades 5-12 gain an understanding and appreciation of the Basin and teaches them the skills to identify environmental concerns, make changes, and solve problems.

Land and People - Activity Students look at interactions between people and the environment in three regions of the United States: Cape Cod, Los Angeles, and the Everglades. Targeted to grades 7-12.

Interactive San Francisco Bay Data - Activity Look at plots of data collected from the water of San Francisco Bay, then generate your own plots using real data. How does a change in light penetration compare to water temperature? Does a change in salinity correspond with a change in chlorophyll?

Topographic Map Resources for Teachers - Lessons and Activities This directory level site includes links to various resources on topographic maps, how to obtain them, read them, their history, and map projections and includes links to various teaching activities and modules. It is the one-stop shop for learning about, using, and teaching topographic map concepts.

I ntroduction to Soils - Lessons A series of lessons teaching high school students about soils and linking them to climate, vegetation, and geology.

Exploring Maps - Lesson Exploring Maps  is an interdisciplinary set of materials on mapping for grades 7-12.  Students will learn basic mapmaking and map-reading skills and will see how maps can answer fundamental geographic questions.  The map images and activities in this packet can be used in various courses, including geography, history, math, art, English, and the sciences.   

Constructing a 3D Topographic Map - Activity This exercise uses clear plastic take-out lids, each marked with a different elevation line, and stacked to produce a 3D topographic map. It includes a base map of Angel Island (San Francisco Bay) but can be adapted to any local topographic feature.

27 Ideas for Teaching with Topographic Maps - Activity Contains 27 ideas for teaching with the approximately 57,000 topographic maps that the USGS offers.

Map Mysteries - Lesson Sample questions to use with USGS topographic and thematic maps as starting points to uncover mysteries about the cultural and physical geography of the Earth.

Corn Maze Geography - Activity Visit a corn maze and use these activities to learn about maps and geography.

How to Use a Compass with a USGS Topographic Map - Activity Learn to navigate using a topographic map and a compass.

Map-It: Form-based Simple Map Generator - Activity Enter the longitude and latitude of points to plot on a simple map. Download a postscript version of the resulting map.   Satellite Imagery

Tracking Change over Time - Activity Enhance students' learning of geography, map reading, earth science, and problem solving through landscape changes recorded by satellites in space.

AmericaView - Lessons USGS is a partner in AmericaView, which has lesson plans and other education resources for working with satellite imagery. Mostly targeted to grades 6-12.

Journey Along a Field Line - Activity A sixteen-page comic book about the Earth's magnetic field. Travel down through the interior of the earth then back up into the ionosphere to learn how the magnetic field works.

Antarctic Ice Sheet - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates, through a paper model, why there are changes on the ice sheet that covers the Antarctica continent. By studying the paper model, students will better understand the evolution of the Antarctic ice sheet. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

Chicxulub Impact Event - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates, by means of two paper models, how dinosaurs may have become extinct as a result of an asteroid impact. By studying the paper models, students will better understand the mass extinctions that have been part of the Earth's history. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

Crinoids - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates, through the use of a paper model, how crinoids lived and became fossilized. By studying the paper model, students will better understand the flower-like animal that is referred to as a "sea lily" and its ocean-floor environment. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

How to Construct Four Paper Models that Describe Island Coral Reefs - Activity This report contains instructions and patterns for preparing a set of four, three-dimensional paper models that schematically illustrate the development of island coral.

Make Your Own Paper Fossils - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates, by means of paper models, how two organisms, a trilobite and a nautiloid, became fossils. The report is intended to help students and others visualize the size and shape of a trilobite and a nautiloid, the environment in which they lived, and the circumstances of their fossilization and subsequent discovery. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

Make Your Own Paper Model of a Volcano - Lessons and Activities

This report contains instructions and a pattern for making a three-dimensional paper model of a volcano. This model is intended to help students and others to visualize a stratovolcano (inside and out) and to learn some of the terms used by geologists in describing it.

Paper Model Showing Motion on the San Andreas Fault - Activity This report contains instructions and patterns for preparing a three-dimensional model that schematically illustrates the fault motion that occurred during the Loma Prieta earthquake of October 17, 1989, in California. The model is intended to help students and others visualize the process of fault slip during earthquakes.

Sand Dunes - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates, through computer animations and paper models, why sand dunes can develop different forms. By studying the animations and the paper models, students will better understand the evolution of sand dunes.

How to construct 7 paper models that describe faulting of the Earth - Activity This report contains instructions and patterns for preparing seven three-dimensional paper models that schematically illustrate common earth faults and associated landforms.

2 Paper Models Showing the Effects of Glacial Ice on a Mountain Valley - Activity This report contains instructions and templates for preparing three-dimensional paper models of two features a mountain valley partly filled by a glacier and the same valley after the glacier has melted. Included are brief descriptions of how such glaciers form, how they erode the landscape, and what kinds of physiographic features they produce.

Earthquake Effects - Lessons and Activities The report is intended to help students and others visualize what causes earthquake shaking and some of the possible results of the shaking. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

Landslide Effects - Lessons and Activities This report illustrates how four different types of landslides (slide, slump, flow, and rockfall) occur and what type of damage may result. The report is intended to help students and others visualize what causes landslides and some of the possible result of the landslides. Animations mentioned in the Educator Guides are no longer available.

Plate Tectonics Tennis Ball Globe - Activity Create a mini globe that shows the major plate boundaries of the world (scroll to page 15).

This Dynamic Planet Teaching Companion Packet - Lessons and Activities This Teaching Companion is intended to assist teachers to teach plate tectonics, primarily for grades 6–14.

Schoolyard Geology - Activities - under construction Structured activities use man-made features that are found in a typical schoolyard to demonstrate geologic principles.

The Lifecycle of a Mineral Deposit - Activities A teacher's guide for hands-on mineral education activities. Designed to meet the National Science Standards, this product includes 10 activity-based learning exercises that educate students on basic geologic concepts; the processes of finding, identifying, and extracting the resources from a mineral deposit; and the uses of minerals. Geared for fifth through eighth grade science teachers.  

Collecting Rocks - Activity Learn about different types of rocks and how to identify and collect them.

What's in My Soil? - Activity Students separate, examine and identify the major components of soil to better understand how these components give soil its unique physical characteristics.

Introduction to Soils - Lesson This complete lesson plan teaches students how soils develop and provides links between soils, climate, vegetation, and geology. Includes materials for both teachers and students (handout, puzzle, field and lab sheets).

Graded Bedding - Activity Students are introduced to the concept of graded bedding, in which particles are sorted by size as they settle out of suspension. Students will discover that water is a good medium to separate and sort particles, and that particles have different behaviors in water and air.

Geologic Age - Activity Students investigate radioactivity as a tool for measuring geologic time.

Global Change

Greenhouse Gases - Activity Students observe and contrast thermal properties of three major greenhouse changes over time for dry air, water-saturated air, carbon dioxide, and methane.

Evaluating Glacier and Landscape Change - Lesson In this lesson students interpret USGS data in multiple formats and draw conclusions based on the data presented. 

Natural Hazards

Tabletop Earthquakes - Activity Construct a simple earthquake machine to demonstrate the principles of seismology. Includes supporting instructional material. 

Size and Occurrence of Floods - Activity Students use macaroni or beans to calculate the statistics of floor recurrence (see back side of poster).

Living with a Volcano in your Backyard - Activities A three-unit guide that provides science content and inquiry-based activities about volcanoes of the Cascade Range for middle-school students, with an emphasis on Mount Ranier. Includes more than 30 activities, a field guide, glossary, and supplementary information.

Predict an Eruption! - Activities This highly interactive site uses animations, illustrations, activities, and quizzes to show how eruptions at Mount St. Helens were accurately predicted by USGS scientists, then allows students to predict an actual eruption using real data.

Oceans/Coasts

The Fragile Fringe: A Guide for Teaching about Coastal Wetlands - Background Information and Activities Material to use for developing a comprehensive study of coastal wetlands.  Includes background information, suggested activities, glossary, references, and reading list. Activities can be demonstrated by the teacher or performed by students. Emphasis is on Gulf Coast wetlands.   

Hands-on Experiments to Test for Acid Mine Drainage - Activities Fourteen very basic exercises use home-made litmus paper and household items to test creek water for acid mine drainage and to look at plants, bacteria, and insects living in the water.

Ask a River to Text You with a WaterAlert - Activity Incorporate real-time data in the classroom by receiving instant, customized updates about water conditions at a specific river through WaterAlert.

Outreach Notebook for Groundwater - Lessons Five groundwater-related lesson plans for grades 6-8, complete with forms, diagrams, and supporting information. Although these were designed to be taught by an instructor and a water professional working together, a thoughtful educator could easily handle the lessons on their own.

Resilient Educator logo

ChatGPT for Teachers

Trauma-informed practices in schools, teacher well-being, cultivating diversity, equity, & inclusion, integrating technology in the classroom, social-emotional development, covid-19 resources, invest in resilience: summer toolkit, civics & resilience, all toolkits, degree programs, trauma-informed professional development, teacher licensure & certification, how to become - career information, classroom management, instructional design, lifestyle & self-care, online higher ed teaching, current events, beyond the globe: 8 awesome geography classroom projects.

Beyond the Globe: 8 Awesome Geography Classroom Projects

Geography lessons today are more important than ever. As our world becomes more globalized, it’s crucial for kids to understand the places on Earth and their relationship with each other. It provides context about where we live and how we relate to people around us. It sparks curiosity about other cultures. And, ultimately, teaches that we are all connected. 

So don’t let your geography lessons fall flat. Here are some inspired projects that go above and beyond your classroom’s globe. 

Build a new way to view the world with Google Earth . A virtual globe, Google Earth’s ability to display a world map without distortion can shed light on why Greenland has always looked so big! Introduce your students to the amazing tools and features of Google Earth while comparing cartographer renditions of the world to a virtual version. Explore the world and its structures and ask 20 questions. 

Combine geography and self-exploration with autobiographical island maps . After completing an autobiographical survey, students choose symbols and use their map studies to create an artistic representation of their life in the form of an island.

Use a compass to find your way . Before there was an app for that, travelers used a compass to find their way. Introduce your students to orienteering with this awesome activity. With a short video, reading activity, and discussion questions, you can teach your students how to find their way the old-fashioned way. 

Learn how the world’s first metro system was built . Railroads united the world like nothing before it. Now able to travel longer distances more quickly and safely, industry and culture exploded in the early 19th century. Video and discussion resources can be customized to fit your classroom needs. 

Make a contour map . Topography is often a difficult topic for students to understand. Contour lines, meant to represent the highs and lows of an area on the map, don’t always translate to young students’ minds. By creating their own 3D version with drawing paper, clay, different colored markers, fishing line, and a pencil, students can kinesthetically create a topographical map that makes sense!

Geography Bingo! This activity from the New York Times challenges students to find examples of how geography relates to our world every day using national geography standards. A great online scavenger hunt for one class — or a semester-long project — add a little competition to learning more about the world.

Teach the 5 themes of geography using the newspaper . Full of class, group, and individual activities, this unit of study can be used as a whole, or as individual lessons to supplement your current curriculum. Requiring students to gather examples beyond the textbook will help them connect everyday life with the study of the world. 

Understand Environmentalism: Then and now . Give students a better understanding of the history of the conservation movement with this activity. Developed for high school, students will document the development of conservation over time through research and a culminating essay.

Help your students conquer the world by giving them the learning experiences that will truly engage their interests and solidify their sense of interconnectedness!

You may also like to read

  • Beyond the Classroom: Career Options for Teachers
  • Classroom Management Strategies: How to Keep Your Classroom in Line
  • Social Networking Can be a Vital Classroom Tool
  • 10 Ways to Motivate Students Outside the Classroom
  • How to Utilize iPads in the Classroom
  • Mainstreaming Special Education in the Classroom

Categorized as: Tips for Teachers and Classroom Resources

Tagged as: Engaging Activities ,  High School (Grades: 9-12) ,  History and Social Studies ,  Middle School (Grades: 6-8)

  • Master's in Teaching Online | Distance-Learni...
  • Certificates in Trauma-Informed Education and...
  • Certificates in Early Childhood Education

Fun with Geography

Get ideas for how to have fun with geography in your daily life.

Photo:  A coastal city of Cinque Terre, Italy offers great views

Photograph by Harry Wenkert, MyShot

Geography doesn't mean studying maps and memorizing state capitals! From making a treasure hunt to keeping a sensory journal, get ideas for how to have fun with geography in your daily life.

Photograph of a compass, ruler and map.

Draw a Map of an Imaginary Island

Use map elements, like symbols and a key, to show different features of the island and its people.

Picture of a Neolithic stone circle.

Learn About Seasonal Celebrations

Find photos of seasonal celebrations around the globe. For example, you can search for photos of summer and winter solstice celebrations or celebrations associated with the equinoxes. Share with your family and friends what you find out about the celebrations, where they take place, and how they express the unique characteristics of that particular season.

Photograph of a glass window ornament.

Make an Earth Pendant or Light Catcher

Trace the earth onto a piece of acetate, using colored cellophane for land and water, and hang it from your window with yarn.

Photograph of a book.

Mark Latitude and Longitude

Whenever you read a magazine or newspaper article, find the latitude and longitude of the location in which the focus of the article takes place. On a world map , mark the locations. See how long it takes until you have marks in most countries.

Photograph of a woman participating in a public participatory mapping project in India.

Look at an article in a newspaper, magazine, or online. How might information in the article be represented on a map? Create a map showing that information.

Photograph of a roadmap with the road and desert in the background.

Learn From Maps

Find examples of maps when you are in a shopping mall, amusement park, train station, or another place. Critique whether or not the map is easy to use. Then make your own map of the area.

Picture of students around a chalkboard.

Share Your Enthusiasm for Geography

Spread your knowledge of geography while teaching others how cool it is. Have your class come up with fun ideas to engage others in geography, or start a geography or outdoors club at your school. Here’s some help from the National Council for Geographic Education to get started.

Photograph of a globe.

Find Your Birthday Coordinates

Use the month for latitude and day for longitude. For example, if your birthday is November 26, your coordinates could be 11°N, 26°E. Or, you can make four sets of coordinates for your birthday, depending on whether you use north or south latitude, or east or west longitude. Print a world map and plot your birthday coordinates. What would it be like to have a party there?

Photograph of man walking over U.S. map chalk drawing on sidewalk.

Look around you for maps in everyday life. Find an example of a helpful map and an example of a unhelpful map. Analyze what makes the maps helpful or not. Talk to a friend or family member about how different maps can display the same information in very different ways.

Photograph of a globe.

Make a Papier-Mâché Globe

Use newspaper strips and a balloon. Use colored paints to show land and water and add borders and labels.

Photograph of a compass and map.

Neighborhood Map

Create a map of your neighborhood without key map elements, like a compass rose, labels, and a key. Then have a family member or friend try to use the map to reach a particular destination. Talk about the ways in which the map was difficult to use.

Close up of the Clotilda's ship registration document with a focus on the name.

Create a Treasure Hunt

Give clues based on the cardinal points. If you don't have a compass, remember, sunrise happens in the east. Sunset happens in the west.

Picture of palm trees in the wind.

Follow a Tropical Storm's Path

Plot the path of a tropical storm or hurricane on a map. Record data about the storm , and make predictions about whether a storm will become a hurricane. Confirm or revise your predictions as you get new data.

Photograph of flags blowing in the wind.

Make a Flag

Country flags are designed to represent the history or ideals of a country. Design a flag that represents you—you can model it on your heritage, favorite activities, sports, animals, or family.

Photograph of antique coins from India.

Make a Treasure Hunt

Give each person playing a sheet of paper with clues. For example, "Which house has a mailbox in a certain shape?" and "Name three intersections with four-way stop signs." Set geographic boundaries to make sure everyone stays within a safe area. The first person to return with correct answers wins.

Photograph of a ladybug on a map.

Map Your Senses

Plot an unusual, but safe, route on a map of your school or surrounding area. Use a journal to take notes on the things you see, smell, hear, touch, and taste along the way. Take photographs if you can. Then use art supplies to create a sensory map of your community. Be creative! Use pens, pencils, paint, construction paper, pictures, or any other materials.

Photograph of a globe on a lawn.

Explore a Line of Latitude

Pick a line of latitude and use a globe to trace that line in a full circle. Make a list of the countries and other important features, such as mountain ranges or deserts, that the line of latitude passes through. Think about the similarities and differences between these countries and features. If you don't have a globe, use the MapMaker Interactive to do this project online.

Picture of colorful spices.

Food Investigation

Get the recipe of your favorite family food and find out what herbs and spices it contains. On a map , find the countries that produce those herbs and spices. Do some investigating to find out more about these countries. What kind of climates do these places have? Could you grow the same spices where you live? Why or why not?

Media Credits

The audio, illustrations, photos, and videos are credited beneath the media asset, except for promotional images, which generally link to another page that contains the media credit. The Rights Holder for media is the person or group credited.

Photo Researcher

Last updated.

October 19, 2023

User Permissions

For information on user permissions, please read our Terms of Service. If you have questions about how to cite anything on our website in your project or classroom presentation, please contact your teacher. They will best know the preferred format. When you reach out to them, you will need the page title, URL, and the date you accessed the resource.

If a media asset is downloadable, a download button appears in the corner of the media viewer. If no button appears, you cannot download or save the media.

Text on this page is printable and can be used according to our Terms of Service .

Interactives

Any interactives on this page can only be played while you are visiting our website. You cannot download interactives.

Related Resources

Powerful Geography

Unit: Create a World

Powerful Geography Project

Create a World

Developed by Ben Lewis. Additional help from Jana Poth, Whitney Crews, & Charlie Perryman

Subject and Grade Level: Grade 6 Social Studies/ World Cultures

Overview for Teachers: We have been teaching geography in Texas schools pretty much the same way for almost three decades, with a continued dependence on “top-down” curriculum guides that assume that all students need to learn the same content and skills. The National Assessment of Educational Progress in Geography has demonstrated that this approach is vacant and unable to offer growth and change in geography learning. There has been no statistically significant change in geography learning over 24 years and, in fact, a decline among Black and Hispanic students. It is time for change, and it is the responsibility of Texas teachers to bring that change about.

Powerful Geography is a new way for students in K-12 Texas schools to learn geography. It is a “bottom-up” curriculum framework that begins with the notion that school kids are very different from each other and that they have a wide variety of learning styles and aspirations for college, careers, and civic life. Powerful Geography is a way forward. It is what Wesley Null refers to as a “liberating curriculum”.

Create a World is a multi-day project where students will create their own nations which share a common world. They will make a detailed map, a Google Slides presentation, and a blog to be presented to the class. This project is designed for easy inclusion of multiple subjects. For example, science could have students create ecosystems, math could discuss money conversion, ELA could review/grade the blog.

Teacher’s Note: This works very well for a two-week, end of year project. Please feel free to omit any of the following for your specific time constraints.

TEKS: 6.1.B, 6.3.A, 6.3.C, 6.4.A-B, 6.5.A-C, 6.6.B-C, 6.9.A, 6.13.D, 6.15.B, 6.19.AC, 6.20.A-D, 6.21.A-D, 6.22.

Time: This project is set up for a block schedule, but it can be adapted for any school schedule.

Materials :

  • A large piece of white paper for the group’s map.
  • A printer sized piece of paper for the country’s flag.
  • Access to the internet and a computer or Chromebook

Unit Objectives: For Teachers:

  • Introduce students to the concept of Powerful Geography
  • Guide students into the Powerful Geography website (powerfulgeography.org)

For Students:

  • Apply geographic knowledge and understanding in the creation of their own country.
  • Utilize the Powerful Geography website (powerfulgeography.org) to help suggest careers and jobs that would be beneficial in the creation of their own country.

Engagement: Students reflect…

  • A huge community map is created in a common area like the cafeteria, gym, or library. Students with the help of teachers “Stake Their Claim” and decide on each group’s country's borders. Once the borders have been established, the groups will go back to the classroom and begin designing their country.

Exploration: Students explore …

  • Students explore the “Student Resources” section on the Powerful Geography website (powerfulgeography.org) and choose a job in geography which would help them succeed in building a nation. Later, they will incorporate the career into their project.
  • Teacher’s Note : Remind students that this resource is the connection of geography teaching and learning to the real world.

Explanation: Students explain …

  • Every group should select a member to serve on the Global Response Team (more on this later). This group member will use the career they chose on the Powerful Geography website to help them assist countries that encounter natural disasters, economic strife, or any other crisis. Teacher’s Note: Narrow the jobs down by role. Select five or six jobs from the website that students can choose from.
  • Create flag with a logo, motto, and colors and be able to explain the reasons/symbolism for flag

Elaboration: Students expand …

  • There are SIX daily checklists. Printing each day on a different colored piece of paper is recommended. Students will divide daily tasks among the group. The checklists are below.
  • Teacher's Note: Depending on the amount of time dedicated to this project, you can begin “Surprises” on Day 3 or after Day 6 when the country is completely created. More information on this below. On Day 4, feel free to randomize government selection.

Evaluation: Students demonstrate …

  • Each group will create a presentation in Google Slides, a detailed map of their country, and a “blog” on a Google Doc.
  • More information on assessment at end of document
  • Choose Group
  • Brainstorm Country name
  • Flag Creator: __________________
  • Design logo, motto, and colors
  • Draw on provided paper
  • Define reasons/symbolism for flag
  • Creator: ______________________
  • Country name
  • Group member names
  • Blogger: _______________________
  • Describe Border Negotiations (how you selected your land)
  • Describe creation and symbolism of the flag
  • Did you encounter natives?
  • What seems to be the best natural resources?
  • What seems to be some of the worst problems when it comes to the landscape?
  • Teams will work collaboratively to identify geographical features of your country and. determine the climate of the country based on map location.
  • Cartographer: _________________
  • Identify major geographical features of country and LABEL on the map
  • Create compass rose
  • Identify climate of country based on location on the planet
  • Presentation Person: ______________
  • Climate information slide
  • Geographical information slide
  • Blogger: ____________________
  • Description of landscape, climate, and initial exploration with at least ONE story describing a challenge or a surprise.
  • Teams will work collaboratively to determine natural resources based on geographical features of their country. Teams will decide where the resources are found, how they are used, and if they are traded or sold. Who are they traded or sold to? How does that resource affect the country?
  • Add to the map:
  • Label location of each natural resource
  • Consider where the natural resources are found
  • What is the best way to transport those resources? Which route would work best?
  • Name and label each state on the map
  • Determine the name/location of capital city of each state and place it on the map
  • Add elements of map to key for natural resources and cities
  • Presentation: ________________
  • How they are used
  • How they are transported
  • Are they traded/sold? To whom?
  • How the resources affect the country
  • Blogger: __________________
  • Describe natural resources (how they are used, where they are found, are they traded or sold, and to whom) and how those resources affect the country
  • Teams will work collaboratively to determine the type of government, how it works, whom the leader is, and if the government has remained the same since the beginning.
  • Cartographer: _______________________
  • Complete any aspects from previous days that have not been completed
  • Presentation: ________________________
  • Type of government and how it works
  • Has it been the same since the beginning? If not, why the change?
  • Blogger: ___________________________
  • Government and how it works
  • If the same government has been in place since the beginning
  • Teams will work collaboratively to determine the culture of the country including language, clothing, religion, traditions, holidays, greetings, and art (songs, artwork, dance).
  • Finish any missing elements
  • Add color and detail
  • Make sure map key is complete
  • Language, clothing, religion, traditions, holidays, greetings, and art
  • Make sure all slides are complete
  • Know who will say what; be prepared for questions
  • Describe culture (clothing, religion, traditions, holidays, greetings, and art)

Day 6 (optional science)

  • Put the finishing touches on the map with color and detail.
  • Check that the map key is complete.
  • Presentation: _________________
  • Animals, plant, food chain, biotic, and abiotic factors
  • Make sure the rest of the slides are complete.
  • Describe the type of ecosystem.
  • How do humans negatively affect your country’s ecosystem?
  • How does the climate affect the ecosystem?
  • How have plants and animals developed?
  • Describe an animal habitat commonly found in your country.

Starting with Day 3, randomize events to throw at groups. Let them discuss with each other and with the class’s Global Response Team on how they solve the problem. Events can include but are not limited to these: - Earthquake - Tornado - Monsoon - Hurricane - Floods - Wildfires - Avalanche - Snowstorm - Plague - Volcanic eruption - Assassination of leader - Animal attacks on the rise - Struck oil - Discovered gold - Meet a native population - Diamonds were found - Crops were damaged - Crops came in early - Discover new food source (plants, animals, grains, etc.) - Go to war with any country in the room (Solved by rock, paper, scissors - best 2 out of 3)

Global Response Team

Each group will choose a member to be on the class’s Global Response Team. This team will help countries when they encounter a negative surprise. If more than one person in a group wants to be on the team, they should be interviewed by the other team members based on their knowledge of the career they selected from the Powerful Geography website’s career page.

Assessment can be tailored to each teacher’s classroom needs. What has been proven to work for this project is a daily grade based on completion of each day’s checklist and map requirements and two major grades. One major grade is for the presentation the group delivers to the class and the other for the blog entries which are NOT presented to the class.

After the students present to the class, the teacher will ask questions to the group to determine if the students have obtained knowledge of world geography themes like government, trade, aspects of world culture, etc.

Examples of Questions:

  • I see you have red on your flag. Why choose red? What is the cultural significance of that choice?
  • Why did your group choose to place a city on the end of the peninsula?
  • How did you work together to overcome problems like natural disasters?

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): Grade 6 Social Studies:

1. History. The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to: B . Analyze the historical background of various contemporary societies to evaluate relationships between past conflicts and current conditions.

3. Geography. The student understands the factors that influence the locations and characteristics of locations of various contemporary societies on maps and/or globes. The student is expected to: A . Identify and explain the geographic factors responsible for patterns of population in places and regions. C . Identify and locate major physical and human geographic features such as landforms, water bodies, and urban centers of various places and regions.

4. Geography. The student understands how geographic factors influence the economic development and political relationships of societies. The student is expected to: A . Explain the geographic factors responsible for the location of economic activities in places and regions. B . Identify geographic factors such as location, physical features, transportation corridors and barriers, and distribution of natural resources that influence a society's political relationships.

5. Geography.  The student understands the impact of interactions between people and the physical environment on the development and conditions of places and regions. The student is expected to: A . Describe ways people have been impacted by physical processes such as earthquakes and climate. B . Identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical environment in various places and regions. C . Identify and analyze ways people have modified the physical environment such as mining, irrigation, and transportation infrastructure.

6. Economics. The student understands the factors of production in a society's economy. The student is expected to: B . Identify problems that may arise when one or more of the factors of production is in relatively short supply. C . Explain the impact of the distribution of resources on international trade and economic interdependence among and within societies.

9. Government. The student understands the concepts of limited and unlimited governments. The student is expected to: A . Describe and compare examples of limited and unlimited governments such as constitutional (limited) and totalitarian (unlimited).

13. Culture. The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in various world societies. The student is expected to: D . Identify and explain examples of conflict and cooperation between and among cultures.

15. Culture. The student understands relationships that exist among world cultures. The student is expected to: B . Identify and describe factors that influence cultural change such as improvements in communication, transportation, and economic development.

19. Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to: A . Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as oral, print, and visual material and artifacts to acquire information about various world cultures. C . Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

20. Social studies skills. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to: A . Answer geographic questions, including: Where is it located? Why is it there? What is significant about its location? How is its location related to the location of other people, places, and environments? Using latitude and longitude, where is it located? B . Pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns for various world regions and countries shown on maps, graphs, and charts. C . Compare various world regions and countries using data from maps, graphs, and charts. D . Create and interpret regional sketch maps, thematic maps, graphs, and charts depicting aspects such as population, disease, and economic activities of various world regions and countries.

21. Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to: A . Use social studies terminology correctly. B . Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication based on research. C . Express ideas orally based on research and experiences. D . Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies based on research.

22.  Social studies skills. The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Don’t Miss Anything! Subscribe to our newsletter to get the latest curriculum reviews and homeschool help. PLUS inspiring themes such as holidays, high school, unit studies, and more!

High School / History/Geography / Middle School

Create Your Own Atlas – A High School Geography Project

We are studying a combination of World History and World Geography this year for our high school history studies. Create Your Own Atlas is one of the components we are choosing to include in our study of the world.

Studying maps and geography is an important part of not only history, but of practical knowledge and skills. Knowing where something how to find something on a map as well as knowing where something is can help us place things like climate and culture for specific places based on where they are located. Thus map skills are the stepping stones to geography and history.

One of the goals of studying geography is to gain map skills. Map skills are things like interpreting the a title of a map, how to read a compass, how to identify landmarks and knowing how to calculate distance. You will see terms like compass, key, north, south, east, west, physical, political, scale, symbols and more. Knowing these things will help you in your geography studies.

Resources for Teaching Map Skills

  • Map Skills Worksheets from Education.com
  • Super Teacher Worksheets – Map Skills
  • Map Reading Worksheet
  • Elementary Mapping Skills from National Geographic
  • Middle School Mapping Worksheets

Create Your Own Atlas

We are using North Star Geography for High School this year. One of the great things about this program is that it offers tons of options for you to pick and choose from. (See how we Planned our High School Geography using North Star )

One of the activities we chose was to create our own atlas.

To start off with I created a Create Your Own Atlas Cover Page . You can download this and use it simply by right clicking on the image and selecting “save as”.

North Star Geography includes lists of countries, cities, rivers, lakes, mountains and more for you to use in creating the maps for your atlas. If you are not using North Star Geography you can create your own lists for your student to use by doing a Google search for the region you will be mapping.

Another option for creating your own maps is with WonderMaps by Bright Ideas Press . WonderMaps allows you to customize the maps to your specifications with options to add or take out things like borders, country names, bodies of water, etc. This can be used as a stand alone to create your own atlas, or with North Star Geography as your spine.

Check out how we are creating our atlas, and how you can create one too! This video includes a peek at Wondermaps so you can see how highly versatile it is!

Another fun Geography Activity:

Where in the World?  is a fun game to help your students with their geography. It includes free printable cards for you to use!

More Geography:

  • Total: 1.3K

Related Posts

High School /

Online Art Lessons for Kids with Sparketh

History/Geography /

Online Homeschool American History for High School

Middle School /

Mr. D Math Online Digital Music Production Class

Thank you for linking up to The Geography Hop#2! Reading your post makes me really look forward to putting together our Atlas and working with our littles!

The atlases are definitely fun to see come together!

Geography Hop #3 & Giveaway - Aspired Living February 6, 2015 @ 1:25 am

[…] 30 Incredible Nature Documentaries for Kids from Kid World Citizen 2. Create Your Own Atlas – A Highschool Geography Project from Starts at Eight 3. Free Online Geography Games from Kid World Citizen 4. About Globes ~ A […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Storyboard That

  • My Storyboards
  • Log In / Register

World Geography Projects

World Geography Projects and Activities

Teaching world geography can prove challenging and abstract. One of the best ways for teachers to combat this problem is by bringing their lessons to life with dynamic and customizable projects that combine digital storytelling, geography, and student imagination.

Student Activities for World Geography Projects

Narrative Tour of a Country | World Geography

Essential Questions

  • Who hails from this location and what are some of their important accomplishments?
  • What are the physical features and natural resources in this location?
  • How do resources and physical features affect the people who live in this area?
  • What are some milestones and important events in the history of this location?
  • What are some important famous sites or tourist destinations in this location?
  • What are some important facts about this location such as population, capital, flag, language, economy, etc.?
  • Why is it important to understand and study Geography?

Geography goes beyond physical features of an area, and understanding it gives students the ability to connect with the history and development of a civilization. These activities allow students to utilize a variety of different ways to demonstrate their understanding of the history, geography, and important features of a particular location. Students can pretend to go on a virtual tour of a country and showcase different famous sites by choosing a character to be their guide! Students can create colorful and dazzling postcards and travel posters that highlight notable places. They can work on their mapping skills and label a map digitally or by hand. Students can also focus on the physical features of a location in a geography spider map, create a biography poster of a famous resident, or even make a spectacular infographic to advertise all of the incredible facts and statistics of their particular place. These activities are designed to be used at any grade level with any location, such as a city, state, country, or other famous site.

  • • davidcmiller • License Free for Commercial Use / No Attribution Required (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0)
  • • mayns82 • License Free for Commercial Use / No Attribution Required (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0)
  • • OpenClipart-Vectors • License Free for Commercial Use / No Attribution Required (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0)
  • • johnhain • License Free for Commercial Use / No Attribution Required (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0)
  • • falco • License Free for Commercial Use / No Attribution Required (https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0)
  • 4504060 • Vicafree • License Free for Most Commercial Use / No Attribution Required / See https://pixabay.com/service/license/ for what is not allowed
  • 5860680 • Gustavo Santana • License Free To Use / No Attribution Required / See https://www.pexels.com/license/ for what is not allowed
  • 8279585 • Los Muertos Crew • License Free To Use / No Attribution Required / See https://www.pexels.com/license/ for what is not allowed
  • 9216207 • Red Light Films & Photography • License Free To Use / No Attribution Required / See https://www.pexels.com/license/ for what is not allowed
  • Eiffel Tower from the Bottom • mikeyyuen • License Attribution, Non Commercial (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/)

Try 1 Month For

30 Day Money Back Guarantee New Customers Only Full Price After Introductory Offer

Learn more about our Department, School, and District packages

Walking by the Way

the road to inspired learning

60 Super Geography Fair Project Ideas

August 24, 2015 by ami 6 Comments

world geography projects high school

Do you need some new inspiration for your Geography Fair Project? This list contains sixty (plus a few extra!) geography project ideas to help your student get moving toward an amazing Geography Fair  display!

A huge thanks to all the fantastic kids in our homeschool co-op. All of the photos are of their fabulous efforts in creating great geography fair displays.

1. Color a Flag

2. Sew a Flag

3. Display a Large Fabric Flag

4. Create a Flag Mosaic

5. Compile a National Treasure Box

6. Create a Time Line of the History of the Country, State, or Region

7. Cultural Music with Headphones

8. Display Photographs

9. Display Post Cards

10. Create a  Salt Dough Map

11. Bake a  Cookie Dough Map

12. Construct a Map with Strings Connecting to Points of Interest

13. Tri-fold Board Display

14. Create a Cultural Craft

15. Have a Make It-Take It Craft Station

16. Print Recipe Cards make multiple copies so others can take one home and try the recipe!

17. Share Food Samples World Market is a great place to find already prepared food from the country you are studying.

18. Display a Cooking Project and Offer Samples

19. Super Simple File Folder Report Grab the pack from the continent you need and get your student started on a file folder report for his or her country choice.

  • Super Simple File Folder Reports: Asia
  • Super Simple File Folder Reports: Africa
  • Super Simple File Folder Reports: Europe
  • Super Simple File Folder Reports: North America
  • Super Simple File Folder Reports: South America

world geography projects high school

20. Interactive Word Game for foreign languages or even similar languages; the game below was made with pockets

21. Sew Traditional Clothes

22. Wear a Costume or Traditional Clothes

23. Have Clothes for Attendees to Try On

24. Display a Doll in Traditional Dress

25. Make a Scrapbook

26. Collect Money to Display

27. Collect Toys to Display

28. Collect Other Artifacts to Display

29. Create a Country Lapbook

world geography projects high school

30. Complete an Animal Lapbook

31. Display a Lapbook on a Tri-fold Board

32. Make a Poster Board

33. Write a Report

34. Make a Mural

35. Craft a Pop-up Book scroll down until you find it

36. Put Together a Notebook

37. Build a Model

38. Design a Webpage share it on a laptop or tablet

39. Make a Triarama

40. Create a 4D Triorama/Pyramid

41. Construct an Electric Wired Answer Board

42. Craft a Diorama instructions for a Shoebox Diorama

43. Use Graphs to Display Information

44. Use Charts to Display Information

45. Display a Game ​Specific to Your Country’s Culture

46. Make an Interactive Matching Game

47. Trivia Quiz You can do this in the form of a notebook or as a video display

48. Display a Game Invented in the Country You Are Presenting

49.  Host a Coloring Contest at Your Table

​50. Use a Teaser Question at Your Display

51. Wear a Teaser Question Around Your Neck

52. Craft a Clay Sculpture

53. Create Clay Animals

world geography projects high school

54. Make a Paper Mache Sculpture

55. Offer Attendees Coloring Pages Connected to Your Project

56. Create a Travel Brochure

57. Display Actual Travel Brochures

58. Display a Native Plant

59. Design a LEGO Building Project

60. PowerPoint Presentation display with a laptop or tablet at your table

61. Create a Video Presentation display with a laptop or tablet at your table

62. Display Picture Books Set in Your Country, State, or Region

63. Make a Suitcase Scrapbook

Check out my  Geography Fairs Page  for posts on:

  • How to Start a Geography Fair
  • Geography Fair Research and Project Ideas

world geography projects high school

[…] my Geography Fair Project Ideas post has been helpful to my readers, I decided to create this Literature Fair Project Ideas post, […]

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

TheHighSchooler

8 Fun Geography Activities for High School Students

As a teacher, you know how important it is to get students to enjoy a subject so they can engage with it better and grasp its concepts. Geography as a subject can get a little dull if not taught in an appealing way. Hands-on activities are a great way to get students involved in the subject. 

Geography is not just about learning about the locations of places and landforms but also involves the study of how humans and their social life interconnect with their location.

To help students learn these geographical concepts better, you can incorporate periodic hands-on activities to give your students a chance to learn and express their understanding of a topic through these activities. 

Fun and Engaging Geography Activities for High Schoolers

1. let’s locate.

This activity aims to teach students the location of different places around the world. 

  • Lend your students two types of maps – it could be a political map, a regional map, a topographical map, or a world map. 
  • Now ask them to locate a place or a region on the two maps.
  • Ask the students to use their understanding to describe the location of the place in multiple ways. It could be in terms of latitude and longitude, regional cues, or in comparison to other places.
  • You could stop here or continue further by giving students a chance to create maps and mention the location of the place of study and discuss the major points about the location.

2. Terrain Models

Here is an activity giving students a chance to use their creativity as well. Geography involves the study of different landforms on earth. You can help students boost their understanding of landforms using this activity.

  • Let students bring supplies like clay, cardboard, or an aluminum bin. 
  • Ask them to build models of terrains found on our planet, such as forests, mountains, canyons, deserts, oases, etc. 
  • They could also include water bodies if required. But make sure students leave the clay to dry out for a day or two before filing in water to depict water bodies in their models.
  • Once the models are ready, students can give a presentation on their models and explain the various features of the terrain they are showcasing.

3. Venn Diagrams

You can use Venn diagrams to teach students the similarities and differences between two geographical regions.

  • Begin by explaining how a Venn diagram can be used to display, compare and contrast two places or regions of the world. 
  • Next, you can ask them to create their own Venn diagrams by selecting two places from different parts of the world. They can mention the similar features of these places and the features that set them apart. 
  • When they have completed drawing their Venn diagrams, they can take a few minutes to explain their diagram and findings to their classmates.

4. Picture Study

You can conduct a group activity using pictures from different parts of the world.

  • First, divide your class into small groups.
  • Hand over each group a couple of pictures from different regions of the world and let them analyze them.
  • Ask the students to brainstorm answers for the following questions – 
  • What do these pictures depict?
  • What geographical features can you imagine or identify by looking at the pictures?
  • Can you identify the culture by looking at the images?
  • Can you establish a relationship between the culture depicted in the picture with its geographical attributes?
  • When the students are ready with their answers, you can go to each group and discuss their findings.

5. States and Their Capitals

Here is an activity to teach students about 50 states in the US and their capitals.

  • Begin by distributing blank US maps to your students.
  • Now ask your students to mark all states within the country and their capitals.
  • To enhance their knowledge further, students can write an essay on five states and their capitals, mainly focusing on why those cities were selected as the state’s capital.
  • After essay writing, students can read it aloud and share their knowledge with the rest of the students in the class.

6. Wonders of The World Scrapbook

High school students will enjoy this activity as making a scrapbook is a lot of fun.

  • Instruct your students to collect as much information as possible about different wonders of the world and make a scrapbook on the topic.
  • Give students the freedom to decorate their scrapbooks as they want. You can give a week’s time to prepare their scrapbooks and bring them to the class on a particular day.
  • Set up a display table and let each student display the scrapbook. Give students some time to go through each other’s work and discuss their findings.

7. Chart-Making Activity

This is a great team activity wherein the entire class can come together to make a large chart of mountains, rivers, and deserts which can later be displayed on the classroom wall.

  • Ask each student to collect pictures and information like the location, features, and significance of one river, one mountain, and one desert from around the world.
  • Let them bring it in and make the chart in the class. 
  • They can decorate the chart as they like, and once they are done, you can help them put it up on a wall. 

Having all the information in one chart can allow them to go through it whenever they are free.

A diorama is a model consisting of three-dimensional figures depicting a particular scene. It is a fun hands-on learning activity where students use their imagination to create models to showcase their topic. As making a diorama takes time, you will have to give students ample time to do this activity. 

Topics like landmarks of a city, its skyline, or even a biome can be a nice choice for modeling using a diorama. Let students turn in their models on a particular day and have them set up a display. Invite students from other classes to see your students’ dioramas and ask questions they might have. Your students will have to be prepared to give answers to such queries while displaying their talent to others.

In Conclusion

Learning geography creates awareness about the world around us. It informs us about differences in landforms, environments, cultures, etc. Though the role of textbooks in effective learning is crucial, conducting interesting activities related to the subject helps in evoking more interest in students.

The activities mentioned in this article are simple and straightforward. You can select the activities based on the lesson you are teaching in the class. This will allow you to blend textbook and hands-on learning so your students can enjoy learning the subject more than ever.

world geography projects high school

Sananda Bhattacharya, Chief Editor of TheHighSchooler, is dedicated to enhancing operations and growth. With degrees in Literature and Asian Studies from Presidency University, Kolkata, she leverages her educational and innovative background to shape TheHighSchooler into a pivotal resource hub. Providing valuable insights, practical activities, and guidance on school life, graduation, scholarships, and more, Sananda’s leadership enriches the journey of high school students.

Explore a plethora of invaluable resources and insights tailored for high schoolers at TheHighSchooler, under the guidance of Sananda Bhattacharya’s expertise. You can follow her on Linkedin

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Want a daily email of lesson plans that span all subjects and age groups?

Subjects all subjects all subjects the arts all the arts visual arts performing arts value of the arts back business & economics all business & economics global economics macroeconomics microeconomics personal finance business back design, engineering & technology all design, engineering & technology design engineering technology back health all health growth & development medical conditions consumer health public health nutrition physical fitness emotional health sex education back literature & language all literature & language literature linguistics writing/composition speaking back mathematics all mathematics algebra data analysis & probability geometry measurement numbers & operations back philosophy & religion all philosophy & religion philosophy religion back psychology all psychology history, approaches and methods biological bases of behavior consciousness, sensation and perception cognition and learning motivation and emotion developmental psychology personality psychological disorders and treatment social psychology back science & technology all science & technology earth and space science life sciences physical science environmental science nature of science back social studies all social studies anthropology area studies civics geography history media and journalism sociology back teaching & education all teaching & education education leadership education policy structure and function of schools teaching strategies back thinking & learning all thinking & learning attention and engagement memory critical thinking problem solving creativity collaboration information literacy organization and time management back, filter by none.

  • Elementary/Primary
  • Middle School/Lower Secondary
  • High School/Upper Secondary
  • College/University
  • TED-Ed Animations
  • TED Talk Lessons
  • TED-Ed Best of Web
  • Under 3 minutes
  • Under 6 minutes
  • Under 9 minutes
  • Under 12 minutes
  • Under 18 minutes
  • Over 18 minutes
  • Algerian Arabic
  • Azerbaijani
  • Cantonese (Hong Kong)
  • Chinese (Hong Kong)
  • Chinese (Singapore)
  • Chinese (Taiwan)
  • Chinese Simplified
  • Chinese Traditional
  • Chinese Traditional (Taiwan)
  • Dutch (Belgium)
  • Dutch (Netherlands)
  • French (Canada)
  • French (France)
  • French (Switzerland)
  • Kurdish (Central)
  • Luxembourgish
  • Persian (Afghanistan)
  • Persian (Iran)
  • Portuguese (Brazil)
  • Portuguese (Portugal)
  • Spanish (Argentina)
  • Spanish (Latin America)
  • Spanish (Mexico)
  • Spanish (Spain)
  • Spanish (United States)
  • Western Frisian

sort by none

  • Longest video
  • Shortest video
  • Most video views
  • Least video views
  • Most questions answered
  • Least questions answered

world geography projects high school

A day in the life of a teenager in medieval Baghdad

Lesson duration 04:46

372,240 Views

world geography projects high school

The true cost of gold

Lesson duration 04:57

438,201 Views

world geography projects high school

The biggest mistakes in mapmaking history

Lesson duration 04:59

764,741 Views

world geography projects high school

A riddle of ice and fire dragons

Lesson duration 05:34

1,130,034 Views

world geography projects high school

Why are US cities still so segregated?

Lesson duration 06:04

416,529 Views

world geography projects high school

The history of the Ukraine-Russia crisis explained

Lesson duration 09:26

28,131,544 Views

world geography projects high school

The dark history of Mount Rushmore

Lesson duration 05:14

739,147 Views

world geography projects high school

Why is this 2,500 year old shipwreck so well-preserved?

Lesson duration 04:47

439,472 Views

world geography projects high school

The rise and fall of the Lakota Empire

Lesson duration 05:52

567,194 Views

world geography projects high school

The rise and fall of the Kingdom of Man

Lesson duration 05:12

1,020,471 Views

world geography projects high school

Why was India split into two countries?

Lesson duration 05:49

3,280,373 Views

world geography projects high school

A day in the life of the Oracle of Delphi

Lesson duration 05:08

1,105,317 Views

world geography projects high school

A brief history of the Israel-Palestine conflict

Lesson duration 12:53

12,850,255 Views

world geography projects high school

Why every world map is wrong

Lesson duration 04:58

749,947 Views

world geography projects high school

The dark history of bananas

Lesson duration 06:03

2,757,772 Views

world geography projects high school

Who owns the "wilderness"?

Lesson duration 05:13

320,335 Views

world geography projects high school

The last living members of an extinct species

Lesson duration 05:32

1,059,610 Views

world geography projects high school

The race to decode a mysterious language

Lesson duration 04:45

793,267 Views

world geography projects high school

Five oceans song

Lesson duration 02:18

18,934,976 Views

world geography projects high school

The electrifying speeches of Sojourner Truth

Lesson duration 04:40

462,062 Views

world geography projects high school

Seven continents song

Lesson duration 02:03

53,203,011 Views

world geography projects high school

How the world's longest underwater tunnel was built

Lesson duration 05:38

3,577,093 Views

world geography projects high school

The dangerous race for the South Pole

Lesson duration 04:48

355,773 Views

world geography projects high school

How the Normans changed the history of Europe

Lesson duration 05:20

3,084,135 Views

Homeschool with Moxie

Ultimate YouTube Playlist for World Geography

This YouTube playlist is a lifesaver if you have middle or high school kids studying world geography.

I love the minimalist approach (aka, no expensive online or full-curriculum option) and our goal is to raise independent learners. By the time my kids are in middle and high school, the majority of their daily work is on them. For sure, I am here to tutor, coach, and keep on track. But I am not going to do all the work – they are!

So, if this approach sounds good to you, here is how it’s looked in our house.

(This post contains affiliate links, which means at no extra cost to you, I will receive a commission if you purchase from the link.  Thank you.)

Elementary & Middle School:

We worked through the Mystery of History books, from Creation to Modern Times, one book per year. Then, when we finish, we start again at the beginning, and I usually have another child in the rotation by that 4-year cycle mark. However, after going through the MOH books for at least 2 cycles now, we switched it up and went more minimalist this year for my two middle schoolers and one fourth grader.

High School:

My oldest is in ninth grade this year, so he spun off our normal history routine into his own scope and sequence for high school.

Typical high school social studies credits look like this:  World Geography, World History, American History, Government & Economics.

(Disclaimer: You need to check with your state for high school credits & graduation requirements.)

So for ninth grade social studies, I bought a used copy of Bob Jones University Press’ Cultural Geography . I also bought the test packet .  However, you could use any core geography resource as your “spine.”

How it looks daily:

My son is reading a section each day and outlining the text. Reading text, learning how to create multi-level outlines, then being able to study from those outlines is a skill that we need to teach our kids. After he takes a test, he looks back in his notes to check his wrong answers. If that information wasn’t in his notes, then we look back in the text together and he is able to see what good notetaking looks like.

Geography shouldn’t be all about a dry textbook. Ideally, we would all travel the world and experience it first hand! My oldest son is lucky in that he traveled with my husband on our final adoption trip to Ethiopia and got to experience that culture firsthand.

Since it’s not always possible to travel, having great videos on hand is a must!

I went searching for a great video playlist for world geography studies and couldn’t find what I needed. So I created an extensive (although not exhaustive) list of great video for every region of the world explaining the geography, the political situations, the history, and the culture of the place.

11 amazing social studies youtube channels

It is based on the BJUP Cultural Geography table of contents, but it will still be useful for you no matter what curriculum you are using. You just need some type of spine for your studies – an Atlas, a pile of library books, a geography text. Most of it is on the middle school to high school level, as some videos discuss geopolitical issues and current events. I have done my best to screen the videos to make sure they are appropriate for kids, but parents, please check out the videos with your kids to make sure they meet your family standards.

So, if you’d like to download my Ultimate YouTube Playlist for World Geography, then grab it below (or it’s in the members-only resource library! )

You can save it to your computer, then your student can open the document and click the appropriate video links for each chapter’s study.

If you want to extend the learning past the textbook and videos, you can have them write short papers describing the interplay between geography, economics, culture, movement, politics, and history.

I have a Playlist for High School Physical Science as well!

Check out my other resources on my Homeschool Social Studies Pinterest board !

world geography projects high school

Please see our Privacy Tools & Privacy Policy .

Homeschool With Moxie Podcast

10 Truths to Crush Homeschool Burnout {FREE class}

How to Homeschool in Pennsylvania

How to Start Homeschooling

Homeschooling 101: Basics for Parents Before You Start

Work With Me

Join – Access Free Library

Consultation

world geography projects high school

world geography end of year project

All Formats

Resource types, all resource types, world geography end of year project.

  • Rating Count
  • Price (Ascending)
  • Price (Descending)
  • Most Recent

Preview of Around the World Geography End of Year Project

Around the World Geography End of Year Project

world geography projects high school

World Geography End of Year Review - Poster Project

world geography projects high school

The Amazing Race Geography Project { End of the Year }

world geography projects high school

  • Google Apps™

Preview of European Vacation Project - Perfect for end of the Year! + Distance Learning

European Vacation Project - Perfect for end of the Year ! + Distance Learning

world geography projects high school

Geography Travel the World Semester Research Cumulative Project

world geography projects high school

  • Word Document File

Preview of World Geography End of Year Review Activity Geography Test Prep, Back To School

World Geography End of Year Review Activity Geography Test Prep, Back To School

world geography projects high school

End of Year Review for World Geography - Persuasive Writing Activity

world geography projects high school

High School History End of Year PBL Project : Most Important Thing

world geography projects high school

World Geography Food Party Project

world geography projects high school

Zombie Apocalypse: 5 Themes of Geography

world geography projects high school

World Geography Scavenger Hunts

world geography projects high school

END OF YEAR PROJECT - Create Your Own Island Society!

world geography projects high school

End of Year Geography Project

world geography projects high school

  • Google Docs™

Preview of U.S. Geography Project Plan a Road Trip Digital with Google Slides™

U.S. Geography Project Plan a Road Trip Digital with Google Slides™

world geography projects high school

  • Google Drive™ folder

Preview of World History End of the Year or Semester Travel Research Project

World History End of the Year or Semester Travel Research Project

  • Rich Text Format

Preview of World Geography: Country Brochure Project

World Geography : Country Brochure Project

world geography projects high school

Geography - Utopian Society Project

world geography projects high school

AP Human Geography Case Study Final Project

world geography projects high school

Spanish Speaking Countries Project

world geography projects high school

Epcot's World Showcase Countries Virtual Field Trip

world geography projects high school

  • Google Slides™

Preview of Project Based Learning | Life Skills | Travel Planning | Google Slides PBL

Project Based Learning | Life Skills | Travel Planning | Google Slides PBL

world geography projects high school

Virtual End of Year Field Trip to BARCELONA - Viaje virtual de fin de curso

world geography projects high school

FREEBIE Make a World Map

world geography projects high school

  • Internet Activities
  • Easel Activity

Preview of Zoo Project (End-of-the-year)

Zoo Project ( End-of-the-year )

world geography projects high school

  • We're hiring
  • Help & FAQ
  • Privacy policy
  • Student privacy
  • Terms of service
  • Tell us what you think

The Classroom | Empowering Students in Their College Journey

High School Geography Activities

High School Spanish Projects

High School Spanish Projects

The study of geography in high schools is particularly important in understanding the world we live in. It offers a wealth of knowledge on the relationship of people and their environment. Geography activities can help high school students gain an appreciation and deeper understanding of the world around them.

Understanding the Geography of the U.S.

Distribute a blank map of the United States and ask the students to write in the names of the states and their capitals. Have them research 20 of the capitals and write an essay describing why each particular city was chosen as the capital. Remind them to consider how waterways or lack of them influenced the selection.

Traveling Across America

Have students pretend that they are driving across America from New York to California. Assign them to plan a trip that will take about eight days by car. Ask them to do research to determine how far they might travel in a given day, where they might stop and what landmarks or places of geographical importance they may pass. Suggest they keep a diary of the trip and record worthwhile sights and exciting adventures. Instruct the students to be aware of how people live in the various parts of the country. Share these materials with the class.

Highlights of the World

Have the students make a scrapbook describing major geographical points of the world. Tell them to find pictures to illustrate and if possible plan a visual or PowerPoint presentation. Examples of appropriate places could be the Taj Mahal, the Great Wall of China, Temples of Egypt, and the St. Basil's Cathedral of Moscow. Research the Seven Wonders of the World to determine why they became well known. Ask the students to describe their findings to the class. Place the scrapbooks on a special table for display.

Rivers, Mountains and Deserts

Instruct the students to make a chart listing the important rivers, mountains and deserts of the world. On the chart, note location, important features and historical significance. Describe these items to the class. Consider the Nile, Amazon, Yangtze and Congo rivers. Bring in visual materials if available. Post these items around the room.

Lewis and Clark Expedition

Have the students research the Lewis and Clark expedition. Check what routes they followed, what unusual problems they encountered on the way, and what plants and animals they may have seen. Write an imaginary journal of the trip. Share with the class. Compare this to the findings on the travels across the U.S. today. Consider the similarities and differences.

World Populations

Make a graph showing major world populations. Discuss the relative population sizes of the various countries. Which have the largest population? Which have the smallest? Are there any particular geographical features that help determine the population? Post the graph on the bulletin board.

Related Articles

How to Write a Country Report

How to Write a Country Report

Sixth Grade Social Studies Projects

Sixth Grade Social Studies Projects

How to Teach Students the Seven Continents

How to Teach Students the Seven Continents

Architecture Projects for Middle School Students

Architecture Projects for Middle School Students

How to Teach Diagrams to Kids

How to Teach Diagrams to Kids

How to Give Ideas for English 10th Class Project Work

How to Give Ideas for English 10th Class Project Work

world geography projects high school

"City Mouse & Country Mouse" Activities for Kindergarten

Activities to Help Kids Identify the Regions of the United States

Activities to Help Kids Identify the Regions of the United States

  • Nations Online: Blank Map Outline of the US
  • Atlas: Rivers and Mountains
  • Travel Channel: Seven Wonders of the World

Based in Bellmore, N.Y., Shula Hirsch has been writing since 1960 on travel, education, raising children and senior problems. Her articles have appeared in "Newsday," "Mature Living," "Teaching Today," and "Travel News." She holds a Master of Arts degree from Columbia University and is a retired professor of English.

  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Black History Month for Kids: Google Slides, Resources, and More!

15 Geography Games and Activities Your Students Will Love

Pass a globe, toss a bean bag, build with LEGO bricks and more!

Geography Games for Kids

Learning about the big wide world can be a lot of fun for students, and geography is the perfect subject for hands-on learning. These geography games and activities will introduce new concepts, broaden perspectives, and allow your students to practice valuable skills.

1. Geography Snap

Geography Snap

This fun game is a one minute speed test for kids to identify as many states as they can. To play, pull a labeled stick and mark the state off your map. If you pull a SNAP stick, though, you’ll have to erase your map and start again.

Learn more: 123Homeschool4ME

2. 20 Questions

The classic game of 20 questions can be a perfect fit in your geography study. First, have one student come up with a state, country, or continent. Then, allow students to ask a yes or no question, one at a time. For example: “Is this state in the north?”, “Is this state on the coast?”, “Was this state one of the original colonies?”, etc. The goal, of course, is to guess the correct answer in 20 questions or less.

3. Battle of the States

Battle of the States game with cards and categories

Kids will recognize this fun game as a version of the card game War. Download these free trading cards with colored illustrations of each state, along with interesting facts. To play, deal all of the cards out to two players, face down. Each player pulls the top card, keeping it to themself, and calls out a category (population, electoral votes, etc.). Each player reads off the appropriate number, and the player with the higher number keeps the cards. 

Learn more: Deceptively Educational

4. Bean Bag Maps

This is a simple but fun way to review geography. Have a supply of small bean bags handy and a large map of the world and/or the U.S. posted on the wall. One at a time, ask a student to toss a bean bag at a site on the map, for instance, the Pacific Ocean, Mexico, or Colorado. If they make an accurate throw they get a point, and if they miss, they must tell you what they hit instead. Kids could play this in a small group or with a partner, taking turns calling out locations and tossing the bean bag. Or, you could use this activity for whole-class review.

5. LEGO Landmarks

LEGO landmarks for different locations

How fun is this? Students look at pictures of international landmarks and try to recreate them with LEGO bricks. Landmark flashcards can be found through Amazon, Etsy, Walmart and more. Or better yet, have students do research on the computer and make their own.

Learn more: HomeGrownLearners

6. Fun with Flags

Flags strung across a wall as a geography activity

Flags are an important part of a nation’s identity, and learning about flags helps kids identify and remember places around the world. For this activity, ask each student to choose a country they are interested in. Have them do a bit of research and create a copy of that country’s flag on an 11×14 piece of construction paper. String all of the students’ flags to create a banner across your classroom to give it an international flair.

Learn more: ArtBar

7. Geography Bingo

United States BINGO!

Have a little geography fun Bingo style and help your students recognize and remember the 50 states. Click on the link below for instructions, free downloadable Bingo cards and calling pieces.

8. Alphabet Game

This is a fun circle game that can help students memorize all fifty states. It’s perfect as a warm-up or as a geography review. (It also builds literacy skills.) The first student in the circle will say the name of a state. The next must name a state that begins with the last letter of the previous student’s state. For example: Student 1: California, Student 2: Arkansas, Student 3: South Carolina, etc. You can also play this game with countries. For example: Ireland/Denmark/Kazakhstan, etc. 

9. World Atlas Scavenger Hunt

World Atlas Scavenger Hunt for Middle School showing a printed globe

Discover interesting facts about places around the world while learning how to navigate an atlas. This scavenger hunt for middle schoolers has 26 fun clues from (A – Z), all related to world geography.

10. Memory Game

Download these free state and state capital flashcards and make multiple copies. Create decks of twenty cards: 10 states plus 10 coordinating capitals. To play, students shuffle the deck, then lay each of the cards face-down. The goal is to flip over two cards, looking for a match. If the cards don’t match, they flip them back over. Play continues until all cards have been matched up.

11. Stack cups

Stackable Cups with different locations where students sort

These stacking cups are a great visual to help kids comprehend exactly where they live in the world. Each cup fits into the next, from home to city to state, all the way to the galaxy they live in. Download the free labels or make up your own.

Learn more: Undercover Classroom

12. Pass the Globe

Most kids love studying the globe. This circle activity is a geography version of hot potato. Have students sit in a circle, then turn on some music. Students will pass a globe around the circle until the music stops. When it does, the student holding the globe must identify the spot under their right thumb. Start the music again and play until everyone has had a turn. More than likely, students will learn the names of places they’ve never heard of before.

13. Create treasure hunts

Creating their own treasure hunt is a great way for kids to learn about important map skills. This blog explains the activity with a home map. Adapt it to fit in the classroom by having kids draw a map of their classroom or their school. Then, once everyone has finished their maps, have students partner up to find each other’s treasure.

Learn more: Beth Gorden

14. Coordinates Game

Coordinate geography games with two students using a ruler

Learning about latitude and longitude is an important map skill. This game gives students practice finding locations on a map using coordinates. Make a list of world locations (or U.S. locations) using just coordinates. Pair students up and give them the list and a sheet of gold star stickers. Working together, they must find the location on the map and mark it with a gold star. When they have finished, give them an answer sheet to check their answers.

15. 50 States Song

What better way to learn the names of the states, in alphabetical order no less, than with a song? This catchy tune has been around for years and years, and once you learn it, you won’t forget it.

Learn more: YouTube

What are your favorite geography games and activities for kids? Come and share in our WeAreTeachers HELPLINE group  on Facebook.

Also, check out 20 hands-on ways for kids to learn map skills ..

Clean Up Songs Feature

You Might Also Like

world geography projects high school

13 Unexpected and Fun Geography Lessons To Enhance Your Curriculum

Students can travel across the globe without leaving the classroom! Continue Reading

Copyright © 2023. All rights reserved. 5335 Gate Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256

world geography projects high school

A resource for homeschooling families

Best Homeschool High School Geography Curriculum

This post contains affiliate links and we may earn a commission when you click on the links at no additional cost to you. As an Amazon Affiliate, we earn from qualifying purchases.

If you are looking for a geography curriculum for your homeschooled high school student, there are a number of great options to choose from. You will want to consider both your student’s learning style and your own homeschooling philosophy as you explore the geography programs available out there. If you have younger kids, be sure to check out our other articles, Best Homeschool Geography Curriculum for Elementary and Best Homeschool Middle School Geography Curriculum .

world geography projects high school

Here are our top picks for the best homeschool high school geography curriculum:

  • Best Traditional: Geography III (Second Edition) , Memoria Press
  • Best Charlotte-Mason Style: Trail Guide to World Geography , Cindy Wiggers
  • Best for Struggling and Visual Learners: Trick Geography , Patty Blackmer
  • Best Christian: North Star Geography , Tyler H. Hogan/Bright Ideas Press

Best Traditional Geography Curriculum

Geography III (Second Edition) , Memoria Press

If your homeschooled high schooler enjoys traditional curriculums and appreciates opportunities for self-led projects, we recommend Memoria Press’s Geography III . The program consists of nine units (including an introduction), each based on a world region (e.g. “Eastern Europe” or “South & East Asia”). Students will be introduced to the climate, history, and culture of each region and gain a solid grounding in mapwork, even learning to freehand-draw the continents.

The materials consist of the Textbook , which includes maps and illustrations of famous architecture and landmarks; a consumable Student Workbook , containing short-answer questions about the accompanying unit and map-labeling assignments (for physical as well as political geographic delineations), as well as ideas for further projects in the appendix (great for self-motivated students); and a Teacher Guide , which gives answers to the accompanying Student Workbook assignments along with reproducible maps for practice, brief unit tests, and a final exam.

The schedule incorporates two lessons per week for 30 weeks; for most students, this will allow time for supplemental activities, projects, and field trips throughout the school year. The required materials consist of the Textbook , Student Workbook , and Teacher Guide . Students should also have the Rand McNally Classroom Atlas and Geography I- III Flashcards .

Geography III will provide a solid geography curriculum for high school students, but it is also suitable for middle schoolers. It is therefore an excellent option for younger teens or families with middle school and high school students working alongside one another. If you like Geography III and are teaching younger children, particularly through a classical education approach, you may be interested in Memoria Press’s other curriculums, Geography I and Geography II .

Best Charlotte-Mason Style Geography Curriculum

Trail Guide to World Geography , Cindy Wiggers

For the family that loves incorporating great literature and art into every facet of their homeschool, we can’t recommend Trail Guide to World Geography enough. Using this curriculum, students will see that geography doesn’t mean looking at a bunch of maps in a vacuum. Rather, Charlotte Mason-style learners will be able to incorporate literature and culture more broadly into their geography studies. The program follows a 36-week schedule, with each week offering opportunities for students to approach the material in different ways and allowing self-led learners to do further research on the topics that interest them.

Required materials for this program are the Trail Guide to World Geography: A Teacher’s Guide and Jules Verne’s classic Around the World in 80 Days . Your student will also frequently need to use The Ultimate Geography and Timeline Guide , Geography Through Art by Sharon Jeffus and Jamie Aramini, and a solid set of outline maps such as those included in Uncle Josh’s Outline Map Book . As an alternative to the Uncle Josh maps , you could purchase the Trail Guide to World Geography Student Notebook CD-Rom , which provides similar printables. Also recommended are a good student atlas and almanac. For an atlas, we recommend either the Rand McNally Atlas of World Geography or the Rand McNally Know Geography World Atlas Grades 9-12 . For an almanac, we like The World Almanac Book of Facts 2021 .

Trail Guide to World Geography is suitable for pre-K through high school and includes different questions for students in various grade levels. It is therefore an excellent choice for families with children of multiple ages who wish to work side-by-side. If you are using Trail Guide to World Geography for younger kids, you should purchase an age- appropriate atlas, as well (we like Rand McNally’s Classroom Atlas for grades 7-9 and Jr. Classroom Atlas for grades 4-6 ; or, the Know Geography World Atlas Grades 4-9 . For those interested in a similar program focused just only on U.S. geography, we recommend Trail Guide to U.S. Geography .

Best Geography Curriculum for Struggling and Visual Learners

Trick Geography , Patty Blackmer

As its name implies, this program uses language and visual “tricks” to help students learn geography in a clever way. Teaching states, countries, capitals, and physical geography features, Trick Geography uses simple shapes and imagery along with mnemonics to help students learn in a unique way. A sentence about a “Hairy bird”, for example, helps students to remember the city “Harrisburg”, while the shape of Morocco is interposed with an image of a maraca –“Maraca=Morocco”. These elements make Trick Geography a great choice for visual learners as well as those who struggle with traditional memorization techniques.

Trick Geography offers both a world course and individual unit courses based on region. The world course is designed to take a year to complete, making it an excellent choice for students wishing to undertake a comprehensive geography study that will last throughout the school year. The individual courses take five to nine weeks and can be supplemented with other materials. Depending on your student’s interests and your homeschool style, you may want to use the region-based unit courses (such as the U.S. geography course) rather than the world course. Trick Geography is for third grade and up, so this is another great program option for families with children of multiple ages working side by side.

The Trick Geography world course requires the Trick Geography: World—Student Book , the Trick Geography: World—Teacher Guide , and the Trick Geography: World—Test Book . These are also sold as a set . The following unit courses are also available:

USA: You will need Trick Geography: USA—Student Book and Trick Geography: USA Teacher Guide . Alternatively, you can purchase both as a set . AFRICA: You will need Trick Geography: Africa—Student Book and Trick Geography: Africa—Teacher Guide . Alternatively, you can purchase both as a set . AMERICAS AND OCEANIA: You will need Trick Geography: Americas and Oceania—Student Book and Trick Geography: Americas and Oceania—Teacher Guide . Alternatively, you can purchase both as a set . ASIA: You will need Trick Geography: Asia—Student Book and Trick Geography: Asia—Teacher Guide . Alternatively, you can purchase both as a set . EUROPE: You will need Trick Geography: Europe—Student Book and Trick Geography: Europe—Teacher Guide . Alternatively, you can purchase both as a set .

Best Christian Geography Curriculum

North Star Geography , Tyler H. Hogan/Bright Ideas Press

For Christian homeschoolers who want to see their faith incorporated deeply into a geography curriculum, we recommend North Star Geography. Considering geography from a Christian perspective, the program includes geography skills (understanding maps and navigation), physical geography (earth structure, biosphere, etc.), and human geography (human culture and heritage, etc.). The scripture used in this textbook is from the NKJV and ESV.

The program is geared toward junior high and high schoolers but can also be modified for younger students, making this another good pick for families who want to use the same program for children in multiple grades. It is designed as a one-year course but can be modified for 16, 32, or 64 weeks. The course materials consist of one textbook, which includes a download access code to the digital companion guide. This companion guide download includes projects and activities for hands-on learning; mapwork and research questions; quizzes and a final exam, a grading rubric, and answer key; and reproducible maps. Parents love the simplicity of only needing one textbook and being able to print everything else with the digital companion!

High school is a great time to study geography! Students in high school are naturally curious about the world around them, and many are excited to begin traveling on their own after high school. Finding a geography curriculum that suits your student’s learning style and your own homeschool philosophy is very important. There are many great curriculum options to explore. You can also find creative ways to incorporate geography into your students’ other subjects– history, science, and language arts especially. If you have younger kids, be sure to check out our other articles, Best Homeschool Geography Curriculum for Elementary and Best Homeschool Middle School Geography Curriculum .

UT High School home

World Geography A

Course description.

World Geography A is the first semester in a two-semester series. One-half credit is awarded for successful completion of each semester. In World Geography you will examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography. You will learn the influence of geography on events of the past and present with emphasis on contemporary issues. A significant portion of the course centers around the physical processes that shape patterns in the physical environment; the characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems and their interrelationships; the political, economic, and social processes that shape cultural patterns of regions; types and patterns of settlement; the distribution and movement of the world population; relationships among people, places, and environments; and the concept of region. You will analyze how location affects economic activities in different economic systems. You will identify the processes that influence political divisions on the planet and analyze how different points of view affect the development of public policies. You will compare how cultures shape the characteristics of regions and analyze the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. You will use problem-solving and decision-making skills to ask and answer geographic questions.

Course Objectives

Upon completing this course you will be able to:

  • understand how geography and processes of spatial exchange (diffusion) influenced events in the past and helped to shape the present.
  • understand how people, places, and environments have changed over time and the effects of these changes.
  • understand how physical processes shape patterns in the physical environment.
  • understand the patterns and characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems of Earth and the interrelated processes that produce them.
  • understand how political, economic, and social processes shape cultural patterns and characteristics in various places and regions.
  • analyze how the character of a place is related to its political, economic, social, and cultural elements.
  • understand the types, patterns, and processes of settlement.
  • understand the growth, distribution, movement, and characteristics of world population.
  • understand how people, places, and environments are connected and interdependent.
  • understand the concept of region as an area of Earth’s surface with related geographic characteristics.
  • understand the distribution, characteristics, and interactions of the economic systems in the world.
  • understand how geography influences economic activities.
  • understand the economic importance of, and issues related to, the location and management of resources.
  • understand the spatial characteristics of a variety of global political units.
  • understand the processes that influence political divisions, relationships, and policies.
  • understand how different points of view influence the development of public policies and decision-making processes on local, state, national, and international levels.
  • understand how the components of culture affect the way people live and shape the characteristics of regions.
  • understand the distribution, patterns, and characteristics of different cultures.
  • understand the ways in which cultures change and maintain continuity.
  • understand the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment.
  • understand how current technology affects human interaction.

Required Course Materials

  • Geography Notebook – In the form of a small composition notebook, a spiral notebook, or loose-leaf paper kept in a binder.
  • Pencil or Pen – In order to do well in the course, you must take notes, sketch diagrams and graphs, and solve problems when instructed to do so.
  • Internet Access
  • Adobe Reader

Note:  This course does not require a textbook.

Course Organization

Each semester contains 8 units and one final exam.

Each Unit contains:

  • 4–4 lessons. Each lesson includes some or all of the following components: Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, and Evaluate.
  • Self-assessments to help you check your own understanding of the material covered in each lesson. You must complete these assessments in order to advance in the course.
  • 2–3 graded assignments

Final Examination

The final examination is comprehensive; it covers the material from all 8 units. To pass the course, you must receive a grade of 70 percent or better. You can apply to take the Final Exam after 100 percent of your graded assignments have been submitted, and at least 70 percent have been graded and returned to you.

Format: Multiple-choice, online Time Allowed: 3 hours Materials Allowed: #2 pencils

Semester Topics

Topic 1: Introduction to Physical Geography Topic 2: Introduction to Human Geography Topic 3: Physical and Human Geography of the United States and Canada Topic 4: Physical and Human Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean Topic 5: Physical Geography of Europe Topic 6: Human Geography of Europe Topic 7: Physical and Human Geography of Africa Topic 8: Special Topics of Africa

IMAGES

  1. 1st Year Geography Projects

    world geography projects high school

  2. Creative continents!

    world geography projects high school

  3. High School World Geography

    world geography projects high school

  4. Five Projects to Juice Up Geography

    world geography projects high school

  5. 60 Super Geography Fair Project Ideas

    world geography projects high school

  6. Best 25+ Geography classroom ideas on Pinterest

    world geography projects high school

VIDEO

  1. World Geography classes in telugu

  2. RAS Prelims 2023

  3. #geography

  4. geography 5

  5. Our world (geography for kids)

  6. geography 7

COMMENTS

  1. World Geography Project Ideas for High School

    World geography is the study of the Earth's features, and these three projects will help your high school students learn intriguing aspects of both physical and cultural geography. The...

  2. Geography-Rich Classroom

    Class Collage Have students create a class collage on top of a wall-sized world map. Ask them to collect postcards, and arrange the postcards according to continent and country. Have students add illustrations and photos of political leaders, historical events, and native wildlife from postage stamps.

  3. Powerful Geography Lesson Plans and Units

    Lesson Plan: My Career Journey. Powerful Geography Project My Career Journey Developed by Ben Lewis and Josh Williams My Career Journey Student Worksheet - Processing Sheet INFORMATION Subject Area: Geography …. # 5-day lesson # building path # business path # career # career exploration # creative path # environment and society # geography ...

  4. Lesson Plans & Activities 9-12

    A series of lessons teaching high school students about soils and linking them to climate, vegetation, and geology. Exploring Maps - Lesson Exploring Maps is an interdisciplinary set of materials on mapping for grades 7-12. Students will learn basic mapmaking and map-reading skills and will see how maps can answer fundamental geographic questions.

  5. 8 Awesome Geography Lesson Plans

    Beyond the Globe: 8 Awesome Geography Classroom Projects The Editorial Team April 27, 2020 Article continues here Geography lessons today are more important than ever. As our world becomes more globalized, it's crucial for kids to understand the places on Earth and their relationship with each other.

  6. Fun with Geography

    2 - 12+ Subjects Geography Photograph by Harry Wenkert, MyShot Geography doesn't mean studying maps and memorizing state capitals! From making a treasure hunt to keeping a sensory journal, get ideas for how to have fun with geography in your daily life. Draw a Map of an Imaginary Island

  7. Unit: Create a World

    Create a World is a multi-day project where students will create their own nations which share a common world. They will make a detailed map, a Google Slides presentation, and a blog to be presented to the class. This project is designed for easy inclusion of multiple subjects.

  8. Create Your Own Atlas

    Create Your Own Atlas - A High School Geography Project Heidi 3 Comments October 28, 2014 We are studying a combination of World History and World Geography this year for our high school history studies. Create Your Own Atlas is one of the components we are choosing to include in our study of the world.

  9. Students Create Their Own Countries With this Geography Design Project

    3rd Grade 4th Grade 5th Grade Students Create Their Own Countries With this Geography Design Project Your students will transform into world explorers in search of new land. By Erin Bittman Mar 28, 2017 For this geography design project, your students have set out on a trip around the world.

  10. World Geography Activities

    World Geography Projects By Liane Hicks Create a Storyboard On This Page Student Activities for World Geography Projects Essential Questions World Geography Projects START YOUR 14 DAY FREE TRIAL NOW! Start My Free Trial × Teaching world geography can prove challenging and abstract.

  11. 11 Exciting Geography Project Ideas for Students

    As a geography student, selecting the right project topic is essential for success. To help you, here's a list of Geography Project Topics for Class 9 ICSE: 1. Erosion - Study types and effects. 2. Climate - Analyze patterns and their regional impact. 4. Landforms - Explore mountains, plateaus, and plains. 4.

  12. 60 Super Geography Fair Project Ideas

    A huge thanks to all the fantastic kids in our homeschool co-op. All of the photos are of their fabulous efforts in creating great geography fair displays. 1. Color a Flag. 2. Sew a Flag. 3. Display a Large Fabric Flag. 4.

  13. 8 Fun Geography Activities for High School Students

    Fun and Engaging Geography Activities for High Schoolers 1. Let's Locate This activity aims to teach students the location of different places around the world. Lend your students two types of maps - it could be a political map, a regional map, a topographical map, or a world map. Now ask them to locate a place or a region on the two maps.

  14. Geography Lessons

    How the Normans changed the history of Europe. 3,079,567 Views. 1. TED-Ed lessons on the subject Geography. TED-Ed celebrates the ideas of teachers and students around the world. Discover hundreds of animated lessons, create customized lessons, and share your big ideas.

  15. Ultimate YouTube Playlist for World Geography

    Typical high school social studies credits look like this: World Geography, World History, American History, Government & Economics. (Disclaimer: You need to check with your state for high school credits & graduation requirements.) So for ninth grade social studies, I bought a used copy of Bob Jones University Press' Cultural Geography.

  16. World geography end of year project

    A BESTSELLER! This end of year Geography project is based on the show Amazing Race & your students are bound to love it! This project is perfect for your Middle School Geography or World Cultures class! This project offers research, creativity, and drawing upon information learned throughout the year.This is a wonderful cumulative project.This project is fully editable so you can make it ...

  17. High School Geography Activities

    Geography activities can help high school students gain an appreciation and deeper understanding of the world around them. Understanding the Geography of the U.S. Distribute a blank map of the United States and ask the students to write in the names of the states and their capitals.

  18. World Geography

    Geography is the science of space and place on Earth's surface. It is. an integrative discipline that brings together the physical and human dimensions of our world. Geography's subject matter is the spatial arrangement of the physical and human phenomena that make up the world's environments and gives character to places, large and small.

  19. Geography Activities And Lessons

    Discover geography activities and lessons for all grades. Find hundreds of free videos, games, and interactive resources aligned to state and national standards.

  20. 15 Geography Games and Activities Your Students Will Love

    These geography games and activities will introduce new concepts, broaden perspectives, and allow your students to practice valuable skills. 1. Geography Snap. This fun game is a one minute speed test for kids to identify as many states as they can. To play, pull a labeled stick and mark the state off your map.

  21. Europe

    It is safe to say that Europe has had the most influence upon America culture than any other region on earth throughout modern history. Students will explore Europe by region and will hopefully gain a deeper understanding of the cultural contrasts across this continent. The Europe Unit is 5 week experience that contains 2 maps of the region ...

  22. Best Homeschool High School Geography Curriculum

    Best Traditional Geography Curriculum. Geography III (Second Edition), Memoria Press. If your homeschooled high schooler enjoys traditional curriculums and appreciates opportunities for self-led projects, we recommend Memoria Press's Geography III. The program consists of nine units (including an introduction), each based on a world region (e ...

  23. World Geography A

    Course Description. World Geography A is the first semester in a two-semester series. One-half credit is awarded for successful completion of each semester. In World Geography you will examine people, places, and environments at local, regional, national, and international scales from the spatial and ecological perspectives of geography.