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Strategic Plan

The Maryland Food Bank’s Strategic Plan—which we call MFB 3.0—is our framework for working smarter, more efficiently, and with renewed energy to end hunger for more Marylanders by addressing not just food insecurity, but its systemic, root-level causes that keep up to two million of our neighbors from accessing the food they need.

MFB 3.0 Strategic Plan

MFB 3.0 Strategic Planning graphic v4

Pillar One:

Expanding food access.

Jump to Pillar

By 2024, MFB's food distribution operations and sourcing will be faster, smarter, healthier, and more tailored to the needs of those we serve, through:

  • Optimizing food distribution through operational efficiency
  • Increasing food access to targeted populations and hunger hotspots
  • Increasing the nutritional quality of food distributed
  • Transforming the experience of the communities we serve to preserve dignity and remove stigma
  • Purchasing locally-sourced food to strengthen food systems

Pillar Two:

Creating pathways out of hunger, by 2024, additional resources beyond food will be part of every interaction with those we serve, through:.

  • Expanding the capacities and capabilities of our distribution network
  • Closing resource gaps for food-insecure Marylanders by working with partners to provide job training and wraparound services
  • Changing outcomes for our communities through innovative partnerships
  • Creating opportunities to enable people facing hunger to drive our work
  • Preparing for ending hunger work

Pillar Three:

Organizational sustainability & growth, by 2024, mfb's infrastructure, systems, and outreach will be stronger, increasing our ability to successfully fulfill our mission by:.

  • Moving from theory to practice in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) by applying a DEI lens to all aspects of MFB staff, partner, and community relationships
  • Raising revenues from diverse sources to meet organizational objectives
  • Leveraging technology and automation to continuously improve and inform decisions
  • Engaging staff, inspiring them to learn, and equipping them with knowledge and skills needed to improve organizational outcomes
  • Ensuring that we have the knowledge and systems to support an outcomes-driven strategy
  • Aligning our Board of Directors’ engagement and funding with the direction of MFB

MFB 3.0 Strategic Plan is Built Upon Three Foundational Pillars

We’re experts at getting food to people who need it. And we learned from the pandemic how to do it even better and more efficiently. But COVID also reinforced the need to constantly innovate and adjust to the complex issue of food insecurity—and that we can’t do it alone. We need bold new ideas, approaches, and partners to make sure every hungry Marylander has reliable access to nutritious food.

We sourced, managed, and distributed food that provided more than 40 million meals last year, but the growing numbers—and the stories from our Network Partners on the front lines about rising food prices and costs of living—tell us this isn’t enough. So we’re expanding our partnerships with local farms and vendors to shorten the distance between food producers and consumers, and we’re building a more ecologically sustainable system that provides healthier, fresher, and more nutritious foods to all corners of our state.

Our Farm to Food Bank program is a remarkably successful example of expanding not just access to food, but access to healthier, locally grown produce through our growing number of Pantry on the Go locations.

We’re also using more localized data and scientific research to identify hunger hotspots and determine which food distribution programs work best within different communities. Exciting tools like our Maryland Hunger Map and Link2Feed software allow us to use demographics and technology to more accurately serve our neighbors in need, while new solutions like home delivery and the OrderAhead app will help ease the stigma many feel when reaching out for assistance.

The Strategy Group is a catalyst for change within the food bank and across the state. We’re launching innovative pilot programs and partnerships that go beyond expanding food access to address the deeply rooted causes of hunger with bold new approaches.

Meg Kimmel Chief Operating Officer

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Beyond feeding people, the Maryland Food Bank works with our statewide network of community partners to address the systemic, root-level causes of hunger.

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Greater Cleveland Food Bank Partner 13815 Coit Rd Cleveland, OH 44110

(216) 738-2265

Strategic Plan

For more than forty years, our goal has been to provide the highest quality, most nutritious food we possibly can to anyone who needs it. And we’ve delivered. Last year alone, we supported 1,000 partner programs and nearly 350,000 people in our 6-county service area who don’t always know where their next meal is coming from.

But the fact remains that 1 in 7 people in our community remains food insecure. That is not acceptable. It’s time to address the roots of the problem.

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Strategic Plan

Our 5-year roadmap.

Our plan is divided into four Strategic Outcomes — they represent the core pillars of our investment and focus. Each outcome is designed to best serve our program participants, and our overall success will be achieved by delivering results in close partnership with our key stakeholders.

For details on each of these outcomes, as well as the metrics we’ll use to measure our progress and our timeline of activities, we invite you to view the complete report.

This is our roadmap to the future — a future we can’t reach without you.

We need your support to maintain our time-tested strategies and to pursue new opportunities for growth. We commit to working hard and ensuring your gift makes the most impact possible. How? By leveraging local and national food donor relationships, negotiating significant savings on produce and protein purchases, engaging our volunteer corps, and collaborating with our strong network of community partners.

Because together, we better serve the participants who rely on us. Together, we can achieve our vision of a hunger-free community.

Strategic Outcome 1: Optimize the food distribution network through operational efficiency, collaborative partnerships, and participant-focused distribution projects.

If you prefer a printed copy, please contact [email protected] , and we’ll happily send one to you.

If you have questions about the plan, or you’d like to discuss how you can support it, please contact:

Kim Da Silva, CEO [email protected] (303) 652-3663 ext. 204

Community Food Share 650 S. Taylor Avenue Louisville, CO, 80027 (303) 652-3663

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Strategic Plan

Our 10-year vision, golden harvest is committed to achieving our mission to eliminate hunger by nourishing our communities through healthy food and service. our mission is alive in every person involved, from the people we serve to those who serve alongside us., our 10-year vision is to ensure access to enough nutritious food for people struggling with hunger and make meaningful progress towards ending hunger. our strategic plan is the roadmap we’ve created to reach that vision., together we will work to create meaningful, sustainable impact — and ensure that all neighbors who come to our front door are greeted with words of hope and the nourishment of a meal..

strategic plan food bank

Our Bold Goal

Data from the usda shows an 8.8 million meal gap annually across the 25 counties we serve. our bold goal is to bridge this meal gap by 2030, gradually increasing our annual food distribution to fully meet the need for food assistance in our area., today, 1 in 9 of our neighbors face days without enough food. achieving our bold goal will mean that everyone who experiences food insecurity in our area can receive help and hope., reach every hungry person in every county we serve, end child hunger through improved food access and partnerships, solve senior hunger by removing barriers to food access, bring fresh produce to the table of every family in need, build individual and community health through proper nutrition, implement healthcare partnerships, teach our neighbors to nourish their bodies with nutritious food, build capacity to serve more people, more often, invest in our partner agencies and programs, link arms with schools, businesses, churches, and clubs to feed our neighbors in need, welcome all to serve alongside us through gifts, service, and advocacy, planning model, as we lean into pouring resources into our community, we know this is not a mission we can accomplish alone. we will continue to call on our donors, volunteers, and supporters to join with us as we move our mission forward to better serve those who need us most., thank you for linking arms with us as we work to we achieve this transformative goal together..

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PEOPLE IMPACTED

Share our vision, make the future brighter for our neighbors in need. every $2 donated provides 5 meals., start a virtual drive, host your own virtual drive to celebrate a special occasion, hold a company fundraiser, or just be an everyday hero., partnerships, feed lives in our community through a corporate, food industry or non-profit partnership. we are stronger together, join our community:, get updates and get involved, thanks for subscribing, and welcome to our community you'll be hearing from us shortly..

Strategic Plan: 2022-2027

Feeding America

By 2027, the Food Bank will be a leader of innovative and collaborative efforts to increase food security and equity.

Leading the effort to eliminate hunger in our region, by partnership with others in our community, through education, advocacy, and distribution of nutritious food.

A community where everyone has access to nutritious food and no one is hungry.

  • Strategic Focus Areas

Click below to learn about the specific goals and metrics associated with each strategic focus area.

Strategic Plan Main Segments1

Turning over a new leaf: Using crisis to build back stronger

Food banks have long provided charitable food aid to local food pantries and other frontline organizations serving people without enough to eat. Now, more of them are expanding beyond food to provide access to healthcare, financial coaching, job skills, and other support.

The logic is simple. If people can attain jobs skills, financial resilience, and better economic success, they have a better chance of overcoming the circumstances that cause food insecurity in the first place.

Key to this “food+” strategy is working with community partners that have complementary skills or offerings to help fulfill this mission. Traditionally, food banks store, warehouse, and then distribute millions of pounds of food to a network of partners in a given region. These partners include local food pantries, soup kitchens, faith-based groups, and other community organizations. However, as food banks nationwide seek to maximize the benefit of the food they provide, they are reexamining their networks for partners that can offer more types of services. This includes searching for new partner organizations to help fill service gaps, based on these organizations’ location, resources, existing relationships with the community, and ability to scale.

The Capital Area Food Bank (CAFB) is one such food bank pursuing a food+ approach. Well before the COVID-19 crisis, CAFB had kicked off a five-year strategic plan to partner with providers of basic support services to address the root causes of hunger by improving access to healthy food and resources for better health and financial sustainability. That mission became urgent once the pandemic hit and the number of people without enough to eat in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area jumped 50 percent—from 400,000 to an estimated 600,000 people.

Food security

Food security

This collection of articles and multimedia draws together McKinsey’s thinking on food security.

During the height of the crisis in March, the vast majority of the local food pantries, soup kitchens, faith-based organizations and other community groups that CAFB had worked with to distribute food to the community closed temporarily. CAFB leaders’ first order of business was coming up with short-term solutions to get food out to people who needed it. As time went on, they recognized the opportunity to accelerate their food+ work. This meant assessing whether existing partners could expand what they offered, finding new collaborators, and when necessary, providing services directly.

“We don’t see ourselves as just acting in the food sector, but eradicating poverty, and we need to reach across sectors to do that,” said Capital Area Food Bank CEO Radha Muthiah.

Using tools other than food to end hunger

Food banks across the country are implementing sweeping changes to help Americans who don’t have enough to eat, a number that has swelled to an estimated 54 million during the pandemic. During the crisis, food banks responded by upgrading warehouse practices to move increased food supplies. They shifted to segmented planning for different food sources and distribution channels to operate more efficiently. And they adopted data analytics to improve forecasting and staffing.

But addressing the underlying drivers of food insecurity requires food banks to go a step further.

Even before the pandemic, food banks started shifting from focusing exclusively on addressing hunger to providing job training and other non-food support. Some organizations turned their kitchens into classrooms to teach culinary skills, and used distribution centers to train people for warehouse work.

Since 2015, Feeding America, a national network of 200 food banks that provides meals to more than 40 million people a year , began running pilots with food banks in multiple states to explore the most effective roles food banks can play in eradicating hunger in the long term. Part of this work is to understand how the needs of populations differ by region, and how they’re the same, “so each food bank doesn’t have to come up with their own model,” said Erica Greeley, Feeding America’s vice president of economic mobility.

When food banks decide to expand their impact (in part, by offering more services), the criteria to determine which organizations to partner with need to take into account a group’s circumstances and goals, according to food bank officials and other experts. For example, because the economic fallout of the pandemic disproportionately affects underrepresented people, many food banks want to strengthen relationships with these hard-hit communities within their service areas. Food banks with that goal should seek out groups that are longtime trusted members of the communities that need help, Greeley said. Or, for food banks that wish to pair food aid with financial coaching, they can look for providers of those services that can boast a proven coaching model and an accompanying track record.

Transforming food banks' warehouse operations to improve critical performance

Transforming food banks’ warehouse operations to improve critical performance

In the nation’s capital, helping the marginalized move to the mainstream.

Leaders at the Capital Area Food Bank decided to expand to a food+ mission to counter the economic disparities in its service area, where the top 20 percent of the population is 29 times wealthier than the bottom 20 percent, and where there’s a 30-year difference in life expectancy within a ten-mile radius.

As part of the development of its strategic plan, the food bank conducted a survey that showed its client base lacked access to transportation and would benefit from receiving multiple services in one place. Additionally, prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the food bank also wanted to help people get workforce training that could make them attractive job candidates at a time when Washington, DC, and surrounding counties were growing economically, with companies opening or moving to the area.

“Our strategy has been to help individuals so they can be part of the growth that’s happening instead of continuing to be sidelined and marginalized,” said Muthiah, the food bank’s CEO.

After months of preparation, CAFB officially kicked off its food+ strategy in summer 2019 by restructuring operations to add related staff and equipment, and kicking off a handful of health, workforce development, and education projects.

But when COVID-19 struck, the vast majority of the food bank’s 450 community partners shut down to comply with local safety guidelines. To meet the substantial increase in demand caused by the pandemic and resulting job losses, the food bank pivoted. In addition to distributing food through a small number of partners that were able to stay open, CAFB filled emergency food boxes itself and distributed them directly, including at parking-lot pickup events. To cover areas where it did not have a strong presence, the food bank brought on temporary partners within its service area, including non-governmental organizations, faith-based groups, and local governments.

Mapping out need

Considerations for food+ partners.

Building off the work of CAFB, food banks seeking to expand their services might consider using the following steps to build their own “food+” network:

Start by creating a service-area map. Such a map should show existing partners in proportion to the population of food-insecure people in the area. According to Muthiah, showing existing partners on a map can make it easier to see how many additional groups a food bank needs to work with, and where.

Research potential partners. Once a food bank chooses new services to offer, it needs to identify the organizations within its coverage area that could provide them. If the food bank serves neighborhoods with a younger population, for example, the group might want to add partners that can provide educational services, whereas “another county with older population might need an entirely different partner set,” Muthiah said.

Tailor collaborations to a partner’s status. Food banks benefit from partnering with non-profits and for-profits alike. Many non-profits have strong existing relationships with community groups, and their name alone could serve as a draw to get people to sign up for services. Compliance requirements may also be easier to satisfy. For-profits, on the other hand, might have an edge with respect to innovative products or services that could benefit a food bank’s distribution system or clientele. Many food banks already have for-profit representatives on their boards, and could build on those relationships.

Decide which services to keep in-house. If part of a food bank’s service area includes a food desert—an area with few or no grocery stores—or contains areas without high-quality benefits providers or job training centers, it could be cheaper and more efficient for the food bank to simply offer its services there directly, rather than to partner with a third party.

Consider a potential partner’s ability to grow. Food banks may start a “food+” initiative by launching pilots. But if pilots are successful, they will grow. Any partner that a food bank teams up with has to be able to grow along with them, including both their physical plant and personnel.

Once its day-to-day operations settled into a new normal, the food bank was able to return to rolling out its food+ mission. As part of that deployment, CAFB partnered with McKinsey to understand how to maximize its resources and existing partnerships, and how to find new partners for its expanded mission. (See sidebar, “Considerations for ‘food+’ partners.”)

For that, CAFB and McKinsey conducted a geospatial analysis to look for redundancies and gaps in the existing distribution system, plotting the proximity of food pantry partners to major food distribution hubs (Exhibit 1).

They found that about 57 of the food bank’s direct distribution sites, roughly 7 percent of the total, were in neighborhoods that were already sufficiently served by existing distribution partners. This was an indication that the food bank would be better off redirecting duplicative resources to neighborhoods with unmet demand, either by bringing on new partners, or directly distributing themselves.

The analysis also revealed that 70 percent of CAFB’s direct distributions were happening in a portion of its service area that was home to about 500 existing groups that could be potential food or food+ partners. As a next step, CAFB developed a set of criteria that it could use to identify the most promising food+ partner prospects in that group.

For the last piece of the puzzle, McKinsey helped CAFB calculate how many partners the food bank would need to bring on, by area and services provided, in order to reach its goal of providing full food+ coverage by 2025 (Exhibit 2).

With data in hand, the food bank determined that some groups it had brought on temporarily during the COVID19 crisis could make good long-term partners. In addition, as the food bank reactivates former partners that shut down at the beginning of the pandemic, it is using the analysis to determine which to prioritize adding back, based on where the need is greatest.

As CAFB implements its food+ strategy, it is possible that some previous partners may not be interested or able to expand in ways that serve the community.

If such situations arise, it’s important to ground conversations about partnership changes in the data and put the needs of the food bank’s clients first, Muthiah said.

While Capital Area Food Bank’s initiative is too new to draw conclusions about outcomes, it was important for the organization to “think holistically about its clients’ needs, and tackle the economic disparities that exist in the region now rather than wait for the pandemic to end,” she said. “If we aren’t careful about how we rebuild, the opportunity gap in our region will widen.”

Looking ahead

As more food banks seek to expand their service offering, four steps are needed to help food banks across the country scale food+ services.

First, more research is needed on the models that are the most effective, which can be done by testing hypotheses and deploying pilots. For example, in one Feeding America-sponsored pilot, Greely noted food that pantry patrons can sign up for federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, as well as receive financial and other coaching. The pilot is testing the hypothesis that financial counseling is more successful “when paired with public benefits and food donations,” said Greeley. Moreover, food+ service offerings should be narrowly tailored to local community needs, which may vary by geography and region.

Second, best practices should be codified and shared across food banks. Feeding America took a step in formalizing a process to help food banks learn food+ practices from each other when it launched the Ending Hunger Community of Practice initiative several years ago. Today, the initiative includes 80 food banks that have committed to learning and testing various approaches meant to decrease the portion of the population dependent on charitable food donations. Continuing to expand this initiative, while sharing best practices and learnings from existing work like that of CAFB, can help accelerate the rate of food+ deployment.

Third, as models evolve and coalesce, nationwide partnerships can drive scale and consistency. Identifying at-scale partners that can assist food banks or their partners in providing complementary services like education and job training will be key. And fourth, food banks will have to continue to develop their own capacities to drive this organizationally. Expanding core services from storing, warehousing, and distributing food is not easy—but as Capital Area Food Bank is demonstrating, it can be done.

Kyle Hutzler and Galo Tocagni are consultants in McKinsey’s Washington, DC, office, where Pradeep Prabhala is a partner. Byron Ruby is a consultant in the San Francisco office.

The authors wish to thank Michelle Rafter of Ergo Editorial and Andrew Shearer, head of external relations in New York, for their editorial support. Lulu Chang and Milana Kuzmanovic, consultants in McKinsey’s Washington, DC, office, contributed to this work.

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Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano

Making change together: A one-year update on our Food Bank Strategic Plan

  • Andrea Klassen
  • July 27, 2023

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A year ago, we introduced you to our new strategic plan – a three-year roadmap to greatly reduce the hunger gap in Contra Costa and Solano Counties and create lasting, positive change in our community. 

As hunger continues to rise in our community, the bold, innovative solutions in this plan are more critical than ever. And with the support of dedicated hunger fighters like you we’ve adapted, stayed resourceful and made progress on our three goals:  Empowering our community partners, supporting better health outcomes for our neighbors and improving our ability to serve through data and technology upgrades. 

Here’s a look at what you’ve made possible so far – and some of the next steps we’ll take together in years two and three!

Improving health outcomes and nutrition

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Fresh protein, produce and dairy now account for 60% of all food we provide our neighbors . 

In 2022 we opened a massive new fridge and freezer space in Fairfield, dramatically increasing our ability to store and distribute fresh and frozen foods. We’ve also upped the variety of fruits and veggies on offer, so our neighbors can enjoy the nutritional benefits of everything from cauliflower to clementines. 

These menu additions have already made a big impact on our neighbors – particularly those aged 55+ who take part in our Senior Food Program and may already have complex health needs. We’ve also looked for other ways to support seniors’ particular health needs, like offering reduced-salt seasonings. 

Our young neighbors got a health boost in 2022-23 too! The Kids Nutrition on Weekends (K-NOW) program provides easy-to-prepare food that school-aged kids can eat on days they don’t get a nutrition boost from school meals – which makes a huge difference for students’ mental and physical health, as well as academic performance. 

Going forward, our new Nutrition Task Force is looking at how we can provide more nutrition information to our neighbors to help support healthy choices. And we continue to work with local BIPOC- and women-led farms, so we can provide food that’s fresh, nourishing, and culturally relevant to the communities we serve.

Empowering our community partners

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The soup kitchens, food pantries and other local non-profit agencies we work with also want to get more – and better – food to our neighbors. And your support is connecting them to the tools they need to do it!  

Over the past two years we’ve awarded more than $1.3 million in enhancement grants to our partners to help them purchase refrigeration units, vehicles and other equipment so they can provide more fresh foods and support underserved communities. And once they’re ready, we’re making it easier for our partners to access donated food and take part in our grocery recovery program . 

We also know that our partners have plenty to teach us – especially when it comes to the unique needs of the neighborhood or community they serve. That’s why we’re relaunching our Agency Advisory Council, which will weigh in on strategic decisions, food sourcing and our ongoing diversity, equity and inclusion work. We’re also hosting an Agency Summit this fall that will bring many of our 260 partners together to learn with and from each other.

Improving service through data and technology

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With better data and tech, we can get food to the people who need it most as quickly as possible.

This year, we’re rolling out NeighborConnect –  a new data collection platform that will help us learn more about our neighbors and their needs. The information we gather will give us a clearer picture of the communities we serve and help us identify gaps and opportunities for growth.

We’ve also got big changes coming to our Concord and Fairfield warehouses that will modernize our processes and make it easier to track and use all the food we have on site as efficiently as possible. That means less food spoilage, smarter food purchasing and overall using your support even more efficiently than before. 

You make innovation happen

Since we announced our strategic plan in spring of 2022, a lot has changed – including the need in our community. In just a year we’ve gone from serving about 270,000 people each month to more than 400,000. But through it all, we’ve been able to stay committed to our strategic goals because of hunger fighters like you.

Your generous support allows us to respond to this incredible increase and continue to build a Food Bank that can respond to our community’s needs and help create systemic change for years to come. Thank you! Here’s to the next two years of innovation, partnerships, and the progress we’ll make together. 

More Food Bank News

The Amador St. Hope Center shows Vallejo neighbors you care February 9, 2024

You make a great “pear” – Food Bank volunteers share their stories of connection February 2, 2024

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Fairfield: 707-421-9777 2370 N Watney Way Fairfield, CA 94533

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Public Reports

2021 strategic plan.

In 2017, when the Foodbank unveiled its three-year Strategic Plan, the organization presented a shift in focus from simply providing food for a person to eat for a day to engaging in actions that would build awareness about factors that cause individuals to routinely seek food assistance. Now, leading with a greater understanding about the causes and consequences of food insecurity, we’ve taken the time to refresh our Strategic Plan and include updated organizational values, goals and priorities. The refreshed Strategic Plan “connects the dots” based on what we have learned within the last five years. Further, it builds upon our 40 years of service to ensure we, together, can make a transformational impact in our community for years to come.

Public reports

Ending Hunger Today, Nourishing Hope for Tomorrow

On our 40 th anniversary  we shared our second public report, “Ending Hunger Today, Nourishing Hope for Tomorrow.” This report was designed to help our organization, partners, and community of supporters engage in a process of looking back and forward.

hunger today nourishing hope tomorrow

Hunger and Food Insecurity: The Root Causes and Consequences

In this report, “Hunger and Food Insecurity: The Root Causes and Consequences,” we offer a glimpse of the complex factors guiding the evolution of our work.

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North Texas Food Bank's Strategic Plan

Due to an influx of resources during the Covid-19 response, the North Texas Food Bank was able to distribute a record-level 136.9 million meals last fiscal year, meeting our strategic goal of 92 million meals, five years ahead of schedule.

Not only did the COVID-19 pandemic expose unprecedented hunger in our community, it challenged the NTFB to think in new, innovative ways to address the elevated need. With these lessons, learnings and gained efficiencies, the food bank board of directors and staff created a new operational strategy to address our region’s immediate and ongoing needs. Our new strategic plan is named Nourish North Texas.

A  nourished  community is a thriving community, and we are committed to serve as many of our neighbors in need as possible with the resources that the community makes available.

Grounded in eight key pillars, this strategic plan allows us to optimize both our food distribution and our impact across the North Texas charity ecosystem. Our approach is simple – leverage the NTFB’s resources (nutritious food, funds and capabilities) to respond to emergent food insecurity wherever it exists in a way that simultaneously works to eliminate the underlying barriers to food security. Of course, all of this is directly fueled by our ability to rally the generous North Texas community in the fight against hunger.

NTFB's Nourish North Texas Strategic Plan Food for Today, Hope for Tomorrow

Food sourcing.

Identify new ways to increase food donations and help lower purchased food costs.

Leverage operational strengths in support of Partner Agency growth.

Food Distribution Network

Meet immediate food need in the community with a focus on equity.

Increase awareness of NTFB's work and our Partner Agencies, as well as amplify the voices and stories of those we serve.

Orange Only 04

Nutrition Education

Provide more healthy foods and increase nutrition awareness that leads to lasting benefits.

Social Services

Help our hungry neighbors access vital assistance programs.

Adjacent Services

Make a lasting change in the fight against hunger by addressing its root causes.

Engage community to help make a difference through philanthropic giving, volunteering and advocacy.

Providing Food for Today and Hope for Tomorrow

The NTFB will continue to do what we do best, which is to aggregate, procure and distribute nutritious food via our Feeding Network of partner agencies and direct programs across the 13 counties we serve.

We remain committed to agile, efficient operations as well as to stewarding community resources with integrity. As a critical resource to the community, especially during times of disaster, we will work to advocate for community awareness and on behalf of those seeking food assistance.  

As we move forward with a vision to provide Food for Today and Hope for Tomorrow, we also seek to enhance the equitable distribution of food, to broaden our partnerships and to measure our impact beyond simple meal output.

To help make lasting change in the fight against hunger — for our neighbors and our community — we are investing in proven programs and new approaches. 

Learn more about the North Texas Food Bank's many feeding programs  and our Hope for Tomorrow strategy below.

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Get Involved

Get involved at the North Texas Food Bank by volunteering your time, funds, canned goods, attending events, and advocating for making North Texas a hunger-free community!

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Founded in 1982, the North Texas Food Bank (NTFB) is a nonprofit hunger relief organization that distributes donated and purchased foods through a network of nearly 500 Partner Agencies and Organizations in 13 counties.

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Learn more about our impact and how we help our hungry neighbors and join our fight!

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strategic plan food bank

Strategic Plan

The Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York and the Food Bank of Hudson Valley have launched a five-year Strategic Plan to ensure equitable food distribution across our 23-county service area. In developing this plan, we revised our mission and vision statements to better align with the goals and objectives we set out to accomplish.

OUR MISSION: To lead a network of partners to alleviate hunger, prevent food waste, and nourish the communities we serve.

OUR VISION: All people have the nutritious food they need to thrive.

OUR VALUES: We model our values in our everyday actions – Integrity, Teamwork, Respect, Patience, Compassion, Kindness, Hard Work and Excellence, Responsible Stewardship, Communication, and Trust.

Our Strategic Plan focuses on five strategic areas:

  • SERVE – Working with our partners, we will provide equitable access to the nutritious food required to meet the needs of the individuals and communities we serve.
  • STRENGTHEN – We will build and sustain the Food Bank and partner capabilities required to meet our community service objectives.
  • ENGAGE – We will develop relationships, facilitate conversations, and provide experiences that unify and mobilize communities and the public around the issues of hunger and food waste.
  • STEWARD – We will utilize the resources entrusted to us in a manner that reflects our values and respects our employees, donors, and stakeholders.
  • INNOVATE – We will continuously explore new business models, partnerships, and services in pursuit of advancing our community impact and realizing our vision.

We have also committed to:

  • Invest in the acquisition of additional quantities of food for our neighbors in need
  • Continue to obtain nutritious and culturally relevant food items
  • Make strategic investments with our partners to close the meal gap
  • Launch direct distribution services to distribute food more equitably in places where there are no pantries
  • Enhance our service to the six Hudson Valley counties we serve while greatly reducing transportation costs with the construction of a new distribution center in Orange County
  • Improve internal efficiencies with technological enhancements to our operation

By 2027, the Regional Food Bank, in collaboration with our network partners, will ensure equitable access to the nutritious food required to fully meet the needs of people struggling with hunger in all parts of our service area. This plan will require an investment of time, skills, and resources to fully meet the needs of the food insecure in our area. We cannot achieve this amazing feat without the hard work of our staff, the help of thousands of volunteers, partnerships with local farms and producers, and YOU!

The Trussell Trust runs the largest network of food banks in the UK, giving emergency food and support to people in crisis. Fourteen million people live below the poverty line and in the last year close to 3 million emergency food parcels were distributed to people in crisis.

North Bristol & South Glos Foodbank Logo

We’re launching a new 3 year Strategic Plan!

20th February 2024

Share this:

strategic plan food bank

We’re excited to announce that at North Bristol & South Glos Foodbank, we’re launching a new 3 year strategic plan, working towards our vision to see an end for the need for food banks in our area!

We’re transforming NBSG Foodbank into a compassionate Advice First model, guiding individuals toward lasting solutions, fostering community hubs that extend beyond emergency food, and changing perceptions to create empathy about poverty. Our commitment to efficiency, financial stability, and strategic planning ensures that every action brings us closer to a future without the need for food banks.

Visit our Strategy page to find out more.

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Home & House Stagers in Elektrostal'

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IMAGES

  1. Strategic Plan

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  2. Strategic Plan

    strategic plan food bank

  3. Strategic Plan

    strategic plan food bank

  4. Strategic Plan

    strategic plan food bank

  5. Nonprofit Food Bank Business Plan

    strategic plan food bank

  6. Strategic Plan

    strategic plan food bank

COMMENTS

  1. Strategic Plan

    Fiscal Year 2021-2024 Strategic Plan We've known for some time that the Food Bank's next strategic plan would need to be informed by an in-depth look at what's next in fighting hunger and building a path to food security. But we could not have anticipated the incredible impact the COVID-19 pandemic has had

  2. Strategic Plan

    The Maryland Food Bank's Strategic Plan—which we call MFB 3.0—is our framework for working smarter, more efficiently, and with renewed energy to end hunger for more Marylanders by addressing not just food insecurity, but its systemic, root-level causes that keep up to two million of our neighbors from accessing the food they need.

  3. Strategic Plan

    Strategic Plan For more than forty years, our goal has been to provide the highest quality, most nutritious food we possibly can to anyone who needs it. And we've delivered. Last year alone, we supported 1,000 partner programs and nearly 350,000 people in our 6-county service area who don't always know where their next meal is coming from.

  4. PDF Strategic Plan

    10, 11 12, 13, 14 Executive Summary This FY 2021/2022 plan is the second year of our long-range strategic vision out to 2030. The first year was taken by surprise by COVID. We revised our plan and continue to respond to COVID relief efforts.

  5. Strategic Plan

    Our 5-Year Roadmap Our plan is divided into four Strategic Outcomes — they represent the core pillars of our investment and focus. Each outcome is designed to best serve our program participants, and our overall success will be achieved by delivering results in close partnership with our key stakeholders.

  6. Strategic Plan

    Our 10-Year Vision is to ensure access to enough nutritious food for people struggling with hunger and make meaningful progress towards ending hunger. Our Strategic Plan is the roadmap we've created to reach that vision. Together we will work to create meaningful, sustainable impact — and ensure that all neighbors who come to our front door ...

  7. Food Bank Unveils Three-Year Strategic Plan

    The strategic plan will serve as our North Star for guiding both day-to-day priorities and long-term decisions. The strategic plan is our proactive, multi-pronged roadmap to closing the hunger gap in Contra Costa and Solano significantly over the next three years. Our objective is to distribute not just more food, but even more nutritious food ...

  8. PDF Strategic Plan July 2021 June 2024

    Rhode Island Community Food Bank Strategic Plan: July 2021 - June 2024 Introduction: We are pleased to present our new, three-year strategic plan. It is the product of a comprehensive planning process that was profoundly influenced by events of the past year. COVID-19 affected every aspect of the Food Bank's work.

  9. Strategic Plan: 2022-2027 » Food Bank of Central New York

    Strategic Plan: 2022-2027 Goal. By 2027, the Food Bank will be a leader of innovative and collaborative efforts to increase food security and equity. Mission. Leading the effort to eliminate hunger in our region, by partnership with others in our community, through education, advocacy, and distribution of nutritious food. Vision

  10. PDF Strategic Plan

    The food bank's strategic direction is built upon two main pillars, both of which have food at the core: Provide food to those who need it today, in ways that are smarter, faster, healthier, and more tailored to the needs of those we serve.

  11. A New Strategic Plan Directs Our Path Toward Food Security for All

    Earlier this year, after months of comprehensive pro bono consultation from McKinsey & Company and hundreds of conversations with and surveys of donors, board members, and community partners, Food Bank of the Rockies launched a new strategic plan that will guide our work through the lens of five key pillars. Two of the pillars — Strengthening ...

  12. Expanding the impact of food banks: Using crisis to build back stronger

    As part of the development of its strategic plan, the food bank conducted a survey that showed its client base lacked access to transportation and would benefit from receiving multiple services in one place. Additionally, prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the food bank also wanted to help people get workforce training that could make them ...

  13. Making change together: A one-year update on our Food Bank Strategic Plan

    A year ago, we introduced you to our new strategic plan - a three-year roadmap to greatly reduce the hunger gap in Contra Costa and Solano Counties and create lasting, positive change in our community. As hunger continues to rise in our community, the bold, innovative solutions in this plan are more critical than ever. And with the support of dedicated hunger fighters like you we've ...

  14. Strategic Plan

    Food Bank of the Albemarle's Strategic Plan represents FY2023 to FY2027, and will include the following areas of focus: Read the full strategic plan here: FY23 - FY27 Strategic Plan Service Area Demographics 2020-2030 Meeting the Need in the Food Bank's Service Area National alignment with Feeding America's goals: Read the full Strategic Plan Su...

  15. Public Reports

    Ending Hunger Today, Nourishing Hope for Tomorrow On our 40th anniversary we shared our second public report, "Ending Hunger Today, Nourishing Hope for Tomorrow." This report was designed to help our organization, partners, and community of supporters engage in a process of looking back and forward. Download Report

  16. PDF Sample Ballard Food Bank Strategic Plan

    The four strategic priorities are: Increase Access to Nutritious Food Improve access to community programs that enable self-sufficiency Grow Neighbors' capacity to advocate for ending hunger Strengthen organizational capacity Increase Neighbors Access to Nutritious Food

  17. NTFB's Strategic Plan

    North Texas Food Bank's Strategic Plan Give Now Due to an influx of resources during the Covid-19 response, the North Texas Food Bank was able to distribute a record-level 136.9 million meals last fiscal year, meeting our strategic goal of 92 million meals, five years ahead of schedule.

  18. Strategic Plan

    The Regional Food Bank of Northeastern New York and the Food Bank of Hudson Valley have launched a five-year Strategic Plan to ensure equitable food distribution across our 23-county service area. In developing this plan, we revised our mission and vision statements to better align with the goals and objectives we set out to accomplish. ...

  19. Strategic Plan

    Build a high-performing food bank that brings our values to life through a focus on investment in our staff and partnerships, sustainable operations, and a data-driven culture for continual improvement. READ MORE Get community news and stay connected. Subscribe for Updates

  20. Strategic Plan

    Strategic Plan. Why We Exist; Our Organization. History; Strategic Plan. Stakeholder Engagement Initiative; Equity, Diversity and Inclusion. Our Commitment to Equity; Programs and Initiatives; ... Subscribe to get the latest news from Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. Name. First Last. Email *

  21. PDF in support of the 2021-24 Strategic Plan

    2021-24 Strategic Plan January 2024 Following is a list of the activities SNA proposed to take on during the 2023-2024 fiscal year in support of the Strategic Plan. This list is not intended as an exhaustive listing of all work SNA undertakes in a given year. Instead, it draws attention to the specific, measurable activities which drive toward

  22. We're launching a new 3 year Strategic Plan!

    The Trussell Trust runs the largest network of food banks in the UK, giving emergency food and support to people in crisis. ... We're excited to announce that at North Bristol & South Glos Foodbank, we're launching a new 3 year strategic plan, working towards our vision to see an end for the need for food banks in our area!

  23. Irina Kurmakayeva

    Partnership with the Strategy Director on all aspects of the communication plan development and recommendations. ... Chi Minh City, Vietnam Creating communication strategy Researching and gathering data to develop well-informed strategic plans Generating insights Writing creative briefs ... Student at Moscow State University of Food Production ...

  24. Best 15 Home & House Stagers in Elektrostal', Moscow Oblast, Russia

    Showcasing best features: Strategic arrangement highlights positives and minimizes flaws. Stand out online: Staged homes capture attention in online listings. Emotional connection: Staging creates a positive impression that resonates with buyers. Easy visualization: Buyers can easily picture themselves living in a staged home.

  25. Building Expansion 2023 » Food Bank of Central New York

    Food Bank CNY West End Expansion Progress. Watch on. For more information about how we are building a hunger-free tomorrow or to make a contribution, please contact Lynn Hy , Chief Development Officer, at (315) 437-1899 ext. 247 or Karen Belcher , Executive Director, at (315) 437-1899 ext. 228. Food Bank of Central New York.