• Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

Teaching Expertise

  • Classroom Ideas
  • Teacher’s Life
  • Deals & Shopping
  • Privacy Policy

43 Solar System Project Ideas That Are Out Of This World

October 5, 2023 //  by  Eileen Zajac

No matter what grade they’re in, nothing gets your students excited quite like when you announce your solar system topic! It’s the perfect all-rounder that lends itself brilliantly to so many curricular areas from art to science to literacy, and beyond. There are so many amazing projects out there to do with your kiddos, it can be hard to narrow them down, but fear not, we’ve done the hard work for you! Read on to find the perfect projects for your kids, from preschool all the way up to 8th grade. 

Solar System Activities for Preschool & Kindergarten

1. edible science craft.

Dive into a delectable journey through space. With colorful edible items at their disposal, your kiddies can craft a delicious solar system. Encourage them to use their knowledge of each planet to make their creations as accurate as possible! All that’s left is to enjoy these delicious works of art!

Learn more: The Peaceful Pr e school

2. Solar System Sensory Fun Activities

q0BhSA2RQBWkBrOeGy7f

Sensory exploration meets the cosmos in this delightful activity. Engage your students with a tactile STEM experiment that tells an enlightening space story. Through touch and sight, they’ll grasp the wonders of the solar system and learn all about the eight planets that call it home! As their fingertips embark on a stellar journey curiosity ignites and the universe beckons!

Learn more: Home School Giveaways

3. Edible Solar System

l2t0RDrhS4u8gID35nQe

How about turning your learners into galactic chefs? This edible solar system project is a culinary masterpiece that they’ll love to create. Have them use different candies, chocolates, and other edible decorations to re-create our solar system. In this delicious journey from planet to plate, they’ll craft, decorate, and then savor! 

Learn more: School Time Snippets

4. Solar System Puzzle Activity

solar system project materials

Solving puzzles is out of this world! Enhance the fine motor skills of your kiddos by involving them in an exciting solar system puzzle activity. Provide them with puzzles featuring different planets and encourage them to recognize and name the planets.

Learn More: Amazon

5. Solar System Yoga Poses

solar system project materials

A little movement goes a long way when littles are learning. Introduce your kiddies to yoga by associating poses with planets and elements of the solar system. This active learning approach not only promotes fitness but also helps them remember the names of planets.

Learn More: Yo Re Mi Kids

6. Planet Song and Dance

Give your young ones something to sing and dance about! Create a catchy song and dance routine based on the planets in the solar system. This is a fun, engaging, and interactive way to introduce your kiddos to the planets in our solar system.

Learn More: YouTube

7. Color By Number Solar System

solar system project materials

Launch into relaxing a color-by-number activity. Provide your little cosmic learners coloring sheets with the different planets and let them bring them to life as they color them in using the numbers as their guide. This will help reinforce their number recognition while simultaneously learning about the solar system in a colorful way. 3 – 2 – 1 Blast Off!

Learn More: Color Your Name

8. Planet Mobile Craft

solar system project materials

Here’s a team activity for your little astronauts-in-training. Craft a solar system mobile as a class and let small groups each tackle a different planet, using glitter, glue, paints, and any other craft supplies you can find! This is a hands-on activity that can be hung up in the classroom after completion. Proudly display them as a reminder to your kiddos that teamwork makes the dream work!

Learn More: National Geographic Kids

Solar System Activities for Grades Kindergarten – Grade 2

9. playdough planets.

VQDuy0aTVawVeGCxQk1L

Simple playdough takes on an astronomical twist in this craft. Let your kiddies have fun molding different planets using a range of vivid colors of playdough, using pictures as their guides. This hands-on activity is the perfect balance between artistry with astronomy. 

Learn more: A Little Pinch of Perfect

10. Foldable Planets – Solar System Poster

GFQT45RThuIwDSiKXKGv

This stunning cut-and-paste project lets your little ones recreate the planetary alignment with ease. All they’ll need are the printouts, some scissors, a glue stick, and some coloring pens or pencils Through this amazing craft, they’ll get to grips with the layout of our solar system and make a cute folding piece of art in the process!

Learn more: The Crafting Chicks

11. Solar System Model With Fruits

RpeqKEezQ5mTswPWWYVv

Nutrition fuses with knowledge in this vibrant and testy activity. Task your kiddies with crafting a solar system using an assortment of delicious fruits, and watch as creativity unfolds, and snack time turns educational. Will they be able to create their model before hunger takes over and they eat their makeshift planets?!

Learn more: Kids Activities Blog

12. Water Color Solar System

watercolor-solar-system-craft-toddler-at-play-7-3-scaled

The canvas of space awaits your little artists’ brushes. Encourage them to use watercolors to bring the planets to life, mixing colors and letting the lines blur to capture these amazing cosmic wonders. This art project is truly out of this world and the results are definitely going to be ones to hang on your classroom walls!

Learn more: Toddler at Play

13. Whole-Class Awesome Solar System Project

6RHcWJ73T4eaNaEDcpCn

Why not come together as a class to create an impressive 3D Solar System model? Regardless of class size or attendance, this group activity is sure to grab the attention of all your learners and have them excited for each chance to work on the project. As your kiddos collaborate, a classroom cosmos emerges!

Learn more: Little Lives

14. Spinning Science Craft

solar-system-craft-wide.jpg

Embrace the dance of the planets with this spinning craft all about orbits. Your kiddos will have front-row seats in visualizing the rotations of our solar system with this next idea. Use a paper plate as a base then add paper, pom poms, and other crafting items to represent planets and space materials. This simple craft is a super way to help them grasp the basics of our solar system with every spin. 

Learn more: Books And Giggles

15. Solar System Flashcards

solar system project materials

Test your kiddos’ planetary knowledge with these fun flashcards! Your eager astronomers will be a quick study as they use the pictures of the planets to spark their recall of facts about each one. This versatile resource can be used for memory games, independent study, or for quiz games in class.

Learn More: Worksheets Planet

16. Planetarium Visit

solar system project materials

The excitement will be sky-high! If possible, organize a visit to a local planetarium and provide your enthusiastic kiddos with the opportunity to see, think, and wonder as they explore the stars! This is the perfect educational field trip, where the children can learn about the solar system in an immersive setting. They’ll be talking about this trip for years to come!

Learn More: Science Oxford  

17. Solar System Coloring Book

solar system project materials

Red, blue, orange, and gold- it’s not a rainbow, but the opportunity for your littles to fill their pages with what they know about the planets! Create a solar system coloring book with each page representing a different planet. This not only teaches them about the solar system but will also enhance their creativity and coloring skills. What’s not to love?

18. Solar System Skit

We know how much this age group likes to move – so let them! Encourage your kiddies to create a skit, where each student plays the role of a planet. What a fantastic, creative way for them to use their bodies to showcase all they’ve learned! This will help to reinforce the characteristics and order of the planets with heaps of giggles and enthusiasm. 

Learn More: YouTube  

19. Planets Matching Game

solar system project materials

Let your littles reach for the stars! Design a matching game with pictures of planets and their names to give your kiddos a fun way to practice identifying each of the eight planets in our solar system! They’ll be learning while playing and strengthening their memory skills too!

Learn More: Behind The Mom Bun  

Solar System Activities for Grades 3-5

20. solar system bottle caps project.

planet-model-preschool.jpg

Transform recycled bottle caps and lids into planets in this eco-friendly solar system project! Have your kiddos arrange their decorated items to create an eye-catching visualization of our solar system. The cosmos awaits in this fun project where sustainability meets science, forming a handcrafted universe.

Learn more: Still Playing School

21. Solar System Bracelet

solar system project materials

Bling up your students’ learning experience with this next idea! Have them use different colored beads to represent the different planets to create a solar system bracelet. This hands-on activity allows them to keep a physical and creative reminder of our remarkable solar system. Who knew a solar system project could be so stylish?

22. DIY Solar Jar

TBmA3it9SnWdk7pODAPO

Light up the universe with this DIY solar jar project. Using accessible materials like air-drying clay and string, your learners can create these mesmerizing decorative pieces. Each jar captures a piece of the solar system’s magic and becomes an artifact of light and cosmic wonder.

Learn more: Teach Beside Me

23. Simple Solar Systems Rock!

8aYLgw6JTv2Vpcy76mMO

For a blend of geology and astronomy look no further than this next activity. Start by giving each of your kiddos a rock and let them paint it using acrylic paints or specialist paint pens. Why not challenge them to make one for each planet? Watch as artistry and science meld, resulting in stone-bound galaxies.

Learn more: Artistro

24. Explore The Phases Of The Moon Oreos

solar system project materials

Turn the study of moon phases into a delicious exploration. Start your exploration off by giving your kiddies 8 Oreos each and have them twist the top cookie off. Next, have them scrape the icing off each cookie to show each phase of the moon. This project will see them tell the story of the moon, if they can resist eating the cookies first, that is!

Learn more: National Parks Service

25. Paper Mache Solar System

solar system project materials

Crafting the cosmos has never been so tactile. With the magic of paper mache, your kiddies will have a ball sculpting a stunning solar system. This is a perfect opportunity to recycle waste paper from your classroom as you layer it around a balloon, using glue, to create these amazing planets! From pulpy beginnings, a galaxy will emerge!

Learn more: Hub Pages

26. Hanging Planets

Create a fun and eye-catching solar system display for your class with this next idea. Have your kids draw detailed versions of the planets and hang these using string with added beads to symbolize the moons. Craft meets décor as you create this breathtaking stellar canopy for your room! 

Learn more: All That’s Goood

27. Solar System Cootie Catcher

FDNjX14tTkKaxDUVhVGg

Let your kiddos have a go at this timeless playground game with a cosmic twist. They’ll revive the classic cootie catcher, now infused with solar system wonders, and be revising their facts without even realizing it! This fun paper craft is compact, it’s educational, and nestles snugly in notebooks, always ready for a game!

Learn more: Rock Your Homeschool

28. Create a Solar System Comic Strip

Explore the thrills of intergalactic space travel with aliens, rocket ships, and dangerous meteor showers! There are adventures to be had beyond our atmosphere! Encourage your students to get creative and create a comic strip depicting an exciting and perilous journey through the solar system! This fun and creative project will allow them to express their understanding of the solar system in a super imaginative way.

Learn More: Practical Pages

29. Solar System Crossword Puzzle

solar system project materials

Learning topic vocabulary is critical in mastering reading, and each new unit of study is a super chance to enrich your young learners’ word bank. Design a crossword puzzle with clues about different elements of the solar system. This activity can be a fun way to test their knowledge and improve their vocabulary related to the solar system at the same time. 

Learn More: Precision Roller

30. Planet Clay Models

Bring the galaxy into the palm of your young astronomers’ hands! Your pupils will revel in the opportunity to create their own 3D models of the planets using clay, then decorate with paint, glitter, or even sand to add texture! This tactile, hands-on activity is a fun way to explore the relative sizes and features of the planets.

31. Write a Solar System Diary Entry

solar system project materials

To Infinity and Beyond! Ask your kiddies to pretend they are astronauts who are out exploring the solar system and have them write a diary entry about their adventures. This fantastic and imaginative writing activity can help improve their creative thinking while demonstrating their understanding of the solar system.

Learn More: Twinkl

32. Fizzy Science Project Ideas

solar system project materials

Try out this cool chemical reaction project next. Fizzing planet models will captivate your kiddos using materials you can buy at the grocery store! Grab some baking soda, food coloring, dish soap, and vinegar and you’re good to go! Combining chemistry and the cosmos is a surefire way to guarantee they’re totally captivated by their learning.

Learn more: 123 Home School 4 Me

Solar System Activities for Grades 6-8

33. simple balloon solar system.

solar system project materials

Cosmic adventures and exploration await your students. Bring an added element of fun to your solar system module with this fun idea aimed at exploring the relative sizes of the planets. Use colors that match closely to each planet, and add features like rings as you blow up balloons of different sizes to create this colorful display. Let’s hope there are no big bangs in your solar system though!

Learn more: Pinterest

34. Solar System Facts

solar system project materials

Dive deep into a universe brimming with facts. These amazingly detailed infographics invite your learners to uncover the cosmos’s secrets and document what they’ve learned in a super fun way. A factual universe unfolds, and your kids are already charting a path!

Learn more: Space Facts

35. Planet Fact Fans | Upper Elementary Solar System Project Ideas

rqpKjEc3TYGtzxwAGkRu

Engage with the mysteries of our cosmos. Give your kiddos these eye-catching fact fans, and let them dive into the galactic world of planetary wonders. These fun printables blend facts with artistry and not is the perfect activity to use in your solar system topic. Everyone will be a fan of these planet fact fans!

Learn more: Teachers Pay Teachers

36. Cup, Plate Styrofoam Model For Kids

10.jpg

Who knew the entire universe could fit in your classroom? With a few styrofoam balls, a plastic cup, and a paper plate, challenge your kids to recreate the solar system’s grandeur. This activity is more than just crafting, it’s also a great way to test their knowledge of planet order, size, and appearance. 

Learn more: My Home Based Life

37. Solar System 3D Model

solar system project materials

Bring the majesty of space to a 3D canvas. With this diorama project, you’ll be setting your students the challenge of researching, designing, and capturing the essence of our universe in a miniature model. Set them up with a range of crafting and recycled materials and see their creativity and resourcefulness take center stage.

Learn more: RIS

38. Pom-pom Balls Solar System Model

solar system project materials

Transform ordinary pom-poms into planetary magic. With a splash of color and a touch of imagination, your students can craft a fluffy solar system. Watch as each pom-pom takes on a celestial identity. This activity seamlessly merges tactile fun with cosmic education. A soft universe, radiating vibrancy, waits for your students to assemble.

Learn more: Homeschool Fridays

39. List The Essentials

solar system project materials

See how much your students have learned about space by testing their knowledge! Tell them they’re headed for space, but first, they need to make a list of the essentials they’ll need to survive out there. There’s one rule- if they miss something vital from their list, they don’t get to come! Who’ll be blasting off into the great unknown and who’ll need to go back to the revision drawing board?

Learn More: Wonderopolis

40. Virtual Reality Solar System Exploration

solar system project materials

Bringing the experience to life! If you have access to VR technology, take your learners on a virtual tour of the solar system. This immersive adventure can help deepen their understanding of the solar system whilst they get some hands-on experience with some amazing, state-of-the-art tech!

Learn More: Tech Trends

41. Solar System Debate

solar system project materials

Use the power of debate to hook your students into the topic of the solar system! Hold a classroom debate on a solar system-related topic, such as whether Pluto should still be considered a planet or if there is life on another planet. This can help them to develop their argumentative and persuasion skills all while deepening their understanding of the solar system.

Learn More: Science

42. Research Project on a Chosen Planet

solar system project materials

Spark curiosity and sharpen your kiddos’ research skills by starting a research project with them. Have them each choose a planet and create a detailed research project on it, including facts about the planet, its history of discovery, and any unique features. Make this project even more engaging by posing a problem they’ll need to solve: Humans have to leave Earth – How could they survive on your chosen planet? 

Learn More: Made By Teachers

43. Create a Solar System Board Game

What better way to get your kiddies excited to learn about the solar system than with a themed board game? Challenge them to collaborate in groups to create their very own board game based on the solar system. This can involve trivia questions, challenges, and space exploration scenarios. Remind them to carefully think through the rules, objectives, and components of the game to ensure it’s a success.

solar system project materials

  • Science Projects
  • Project Guides
  • STEM Activities
  • Lesson Plans
  • Video Lessons

solar system project materials

  • 14 Science Projects and Lessons About the Solar System

Use these free STEM projects, lessons, and activities to help students get hands-on exploring and learning about solar system science.

Pocket solar system, play dough models of planets, and pool ball and marbles on a large piece of fabric to explore gravity to represent collection of STEM lessons and activities to teach about the solar system

The Earth, the Moon, the Sun, and space are concepts students identify early on. The names of the planets quickly follow, along with stars and the reality that the Sun, too, is a star and is the closest star to Earth. Students learn that the Earth is one of eight planets in our solar system, a group of planets that circle the Sun at a set pace and in a predictable elliptical pattern. How do you move beyond these basic concepts in teaching students about the solar system?

Despite early awareness of basic astronomy, science related to astronomy, the solar system, and even space beyond, can be difficult for students to comprehend because the scale is so large. Using models and hands-on systems helps students visualize and engage with questions about space and our solar system and brings to life an understanding of Earth as a single planet positioned in a solar system with other planets—and that our solar system is just one such system in the universe. As students model and explore our solar system, they build the framework on which they will expand their understanding of galaxies, our own and others, distances in space, the age of our solar system, the life cycle of stars, the composition of planets, and more.

The free STEM lessons and activities below are designed to help educators teach students about the solar system, including the order, size, position, and distances from the Sun of the planets. In learning about the solar system, students explore gravity; differences in the size, mass, and composition of planets and asteroids; orbits and how natural and manmade satellites work; and more.

The resources below have been grouped as follows:

Modeling the Planets in Our Solar System

Earth's rotation and orbit, gravity in our solar system, meteoroids & asteroids, other planets.

Note : Science Buddies Lesson Plans contain materials to support educators leading hands-on STEM learning with students. Lesson Plans offer NGSS alignment, contain background materials to boost teacher confidence, even in areas that may be new to them, and include supplemental resources like worksheets, videos, discussion questions, and assessment materials. Activities are simplified explorations that can be used in or out of the classroom. Student projects support students conducting independent science projects.

Lesson Plans and Activities to Teach About the Solar System

1. model the solar system.

Students learn early on the names of the planets (and maybe even a fun mnemonic device to help remember their order). But understanding the sizes of the planets and their distances from one another really helps bring understanding of our solar system into shape. The Make a Model of the Solar System lesson guides students in building a scale model of the solar system that represents the size of each planet as well as their distances from one another. Questions : Why are the planets spherical in shape? How big is the Sun in relation to the largest planets in the solar system? In the scale model, what object might be used for the Sun? ( Note : Short, separate activities are also available: Model the Distances between Planets in our Solar System ) and How Big Are the Planets in Our Solar System? ). The Worlds in Comparison lesson can also be used to create a model of the solar system.

solar system project materials

2. A Fold-up Model Solar System

With the Pocket Solar System lesson, students use a single strip of paper to make a simple model of the solar system to visualize how much space exists between the planets. They'll be practicing fractions as they fold their model solar system, too! Questions : After making the fold-up model and looking at the planets all stretched out in a line to model the distances planets are from one another, what observations can you make about the planets that are closest to the Sun compared to the ones farther away? What is a dwarf planet? What is the largest dwarf planet in our solar system, and how far away is it from the Sun? What is an astronomical unit (AU)?

Sample strip of paper with solar system objects marked for pocket solar system

3. The Earth's Rotation

With the Kinesthetic Astronomy: Earth's Rotation lesson, students use kinesthetic techniques to better understand how the Earth moves, what the Earth's rotation means, and how the Earth's rotation on its axis differs from the Earth's orbit. In the activity, students use their bodies and movements to help them understand concepts (like which direction the Earth rotates and when sunset and sunrise occur) and locations (like where the equator is). Questions : Why do people in different locations, looking at the sky at the same time, see different things? What does the Earth's rotation have to do with days and nights on Earth?

Blue marble view of Earth

"Blue Marble" © 2002 NASA Earth Observatory

4. Earth's Tilt and Seasons

With the Kinesthetic Astronomy: Longer Days, Shorter Nights lesson, students use a kinesthetic activity to better understand how the tilt of the Earth relates to changing patterns of light and the change in seasons. This lesson addresses common misconceptions about the relationship between the seasons and the Earth's position in relation to the Sun. Questions : At what time of the year is Earth closest to the Sun? How is the angle of the Sun's rays that reach the Earth related to the season?

Earth's seasons

"Diagram of the Earth's seasons as seen from the south" © 2006 Tau'olunga

5. An Earth Year

With the Kinesthetic Astronomy: The Meaning of a Year lesson, students use a kinesthetic activity to model the difference between Earth's daily rotation and year-long orbit around the Sun. Questions : What is the difference between an orbit and a rotation? Which direction does the Earth orbit the Sun? How long does a single orbit of the Earth around the Sun take?

Earth's orbit

"Earth's Orbit" © 2015 NASA/JPL-CalTech

6. Gravity and Escape Velocity

How does a spacecraft (or a planet) stay in orbit? Gravity is a key factor, but it isn't the only one! In the The Great Gravity Escape lesson, students explore the role of gravity and velocity in a spacecraft's orbit. In the hands-on activity, students spin water balloons attached to a length of string to investigate how the gravitational forces between two objects and the velocity of a traveling object balance to form an orbit. Questions : What happens if the velocity increases too much? What is escape velocity? Why is understanding escape velocity important for engineers developing spacecraft? How are the orbits of planets similar or different from the orbits of a spacecraft?

solar system project materials

7. Modeling Gravity

With the Modeling Gravity lesson, students get hands-on with a large sheet, a billiard ball, and marbles to investigate how gravity works on Earth and in the solar system. With the Sun represented by the billiard ball and marbles representing the planets, students explore how the Sun's mass and gravitational force attracts objects. By experimenting with rolling the marbles from the edges of the model, students will see how sideways motion of the planets helps keep them in orbit around the Sun, rather than just being pulled to the Sun. Questions : Why do the planets in our solar system orbit the sun instead of flying off into space? What shape is the orbit of planets in our solar system? What does mass have to do with gravitational force? Why do moons orbit planets and not the Sun?

Piece of fabric with pool ball and marbles representing planets

8. Gravity Assist Maneuvers

With the Slingshot to the Outer Planets lesson, students investigate how a gravity assist or "slingshot" maneuver can be used to help spacecraft reach distant planets. Students use magnets and ball bearings to simulate a planetary flyby and explore factors related to a successful slingshot maneuver. Questions : Why does it require so much energy for a spacecraft to reach the outer planets? What problem does a gravity assist maneuver help solve when thinking about interplanetary space travel? What is the deflection angle of a gravity assist maneuver?

solar system project materials

9. Impact Craters

Some of the craters on planets and moons in the solar system are caused by meteorites that have crashed into the surface. In the Creating Craters activity, students make their own impact craters in a container of flour and investigate the relationship between the size and depth of an impact crater and the meteorite that caused it. For another exploration of crater formation, see the The Measure of Mercury: Analyzing Impact Craters on the Innermost Planet project. Remember! It is called a meteoroid while still in space, but a meteorite once it hits the surface. Questions : What are two variables that contribute to the size of an impact crater? How does the atmosphere on Earth change what happens to an impact crater over time? Why do not all meteoroids that enter Earth's atmosphere reach the surface?

solar system project materials

10. Asteroids

There are millions of asteroids in space. These chunks of rock are remnants left over from the formation of the solar system, and scientists track and study asteroids for clues about the history of our solar system. The NASA Asteroid Database: What Can You Learn About Our Solar System? project guides students in using an asteroid database maintained by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to learn more about specific asteroids and their properties. Extend it! Asteroids may be useful for mining raw materials in space. Students can explore this possibility in the Asteroid Mining: Gold Rush in Space? project. Questions : What is the difference between a comet and an asteroid? Do asteroids orbit the Sun? What is an eccentric orbit? Where are most of the asteroids in our solar system located?

Four images of the asteroid Bennu from NASA

11. Saturn's Rings

Saturn's rings make it unique among the planets in the solar system. In the What Makes the Rings of Saturn? project, students learn more about these rings and investigate how the composition of the rings contributes to how they look. Questions : What are the rings of Saturn made of? Why do they look like rings?

12. Mars in Retrograde?

What does it mean when scientists talk about Mars being in retrograde? The Kinesthetic Astronomy: Mars Opposition Dance lesson helps students model the orbital speeds of Earth and Mars and learn what opposition , conjunction , and retrograde mean in astronomy. Questions : How often is Mars in retrograde? How does the orbital speed of other planets compare to that of Earth?

Eclipse

"The Plane of the Ecliptic" © 2017 NASA

13. Getting to Mars

With the A Roundabout Way to Mars lesson, students use cardboard and string to learn about the orbits of Earth and Mars and explore the concept of orbit transfers, specifically, Hohmann transfers. Questions : How are Hohmann transfers different from other kinds of orbit transfers? What is a delta-v maneuver?

solar system project materials

14. Mars Elevator

Getting to Mars or to some other space destination takes a long time. Could some kind of space elevator work to make traveling between Earth and Mars faster? With the Space Elevator Problem Set activity, students investigate the idea of a space elevator by working through a math-based problem set. The activity requires understanding of Newton's laws of motion, Newton's law of universal gravitation, and algebra. Questions : What kind of material would be required for a space elevator cable? How do the requirements of a space elevator change depending on what celestial body is used as the anchor?

Diagram of a space elevator between Earth and another object

Note : For additional lessons and activities about Mars and exploration of Mars, see the Space Science & Mars STEM Lessons and Activities resource collection.

The following word bank contains words that may be covered when teaching about the solar system using the lessons and activities in this resource.

  • Asteroid belt
  • Astronomical unit (AU)
  • Conjunction
  • Escape velocity
  • Dwarf planet
  • Gravitational force
  • Hohmann transfer
  • Impact crater
  • International Space Station
  • Light speed
  • Newton's law of universal gravitation
  • Orbital period
  • Orbital transfer
  • Solar system
  • Space elevator
  • Space exploration
  • Terrestrial planet

Thematic Collections

Collections like this help educators find themed activities in a specific subject area or discover activities and lessons that meet a curriculum need. We hope these collections make it convenient for teachers to browse related lessons and activities. For other collections, see the Teaching Science Units and Thematic Collections lists. We encourage you to browse the complete STEM Activities for Kids and Lesson Plans areas, too. Filters are available to help you narrow your search.

Categories:

  • Teaching Science Units
  • Teacher Resources

You Might Also Enjoy These Related Posts:

  • Teach Chemical Reactions - 20+ Chemistry Lessons and Activities
  • Forces and Laws of Motion Lessons
  • Mars Rover Landing: Space Science & Mars STEM Lessons and Activities
  • 26 Science Projects and Experiments To Teach About Types of Energy
  • 13 Lessons to Teach About the Chemistry of Mixtures and Solutions
  • Curated STEM Resources for Teaching Science Units
  • 16 Science Projects and Lessons About Visible Light

Read These Next...

Women in STEM! More than 60 Scientists and Engineers for Women's History Month

Explore Our Science Videos

solar system project materials

Explore the natural world through science and sustainability

logo

How to Build a 3D Solar System Model with Kids

Looking for a step-by-step guide to building a 3D solar system model that is perfect for young learners to create? Read on to learn how my daughter and I made a rotating solar system model with simple materials we already had in our house!

solar system project materials

This post contains affiliate links.

Building a 3D Solar System Model with My 5th Grader

When my daughter came home from school with the news that she needed to build a solar system model for science class, she read aloud the list of requirements that her model needed to meet. Here are the requirements for her model:

  • The sun and 8 planets in the solar system must be created in approximate size to one another.
  • The sun and 8 planets must be arranged in the correct order from the sun.
  • The planets should display unique features, such as rings or spots.
  • The asteroid belt that exists between Mars and Jupiter must be present in the model.
  • The sun, planets, and asteroid belt must be clearly labeled.

After doing a little research, she chose to step up her design game and make the model move, simulating the rotation of each planet around the sun. In actuality, planets rotate in elliptical orbits around the sun, however for simplicity, she chose to make circular orbits. Once she had her design idea in place, we began rummaging through the house to find the materials she would to bring her 3D solar system model to life.

solar system project materials

Science Facts Necessary for Our Solar System Model

Starting from the closest planet to the Sun and moving outwards, the order and names of the planets in our solar system are:

Since we had to create the planets in approximate size to one another, here are the planets in our solar system arranged from smallest to large:

  • Mercury 
  • Uranus 

It’s important to note that size can be measured in different ways, such as by diameter, mass, or volume. In this list, the planets are arranged by diameter, which is the distance across the planet at its widest point.

solar system project materials

Unique Features of Each Planet in Our Solar System

My daughter needed to include some unique identifying features of the planets in our solar system. Here are a few that we could include:

  • Mercury – Has a heavily cratered surface, has the shortest year of any planet (88 Earth days), and has a very thin atmosphere.
  • Venus – Has a thick atmosphere made mainly of carbon dioxide, causing a runaway greenhouse effect and making its surface temperature hot enough to melt lead. Also rotates in the opposite direction to most planets (retrograde rotation).
  • Earth – Has a breathable atmosphere, abundant liquid water on its surface, and a magnetic field that protects it from the solar wind.
  • Mars – Has the largest volcano in the solar system (Olympus Mons), a deep canyon (Valles Marineris), and evidence of liquid water in the past.
  • Jupiter – Is the largest planet in the solar system, has a very strong magnetic field, has more than 75 known moons, and has a prominent atmospheric feature called the Great Red Spot.
  • Saturn – Has the most extensive ring system in the solar system, has a moon (Titan) with a thick atmosphere and lakes of liquid methane and has a hexagonal-shaped jet stream at its north pole.
  • Uranus – Rotates on its side, has a unique tilted magnetic field, and has a system of 13 faint rings.
  • Neptune – Has the strongest winds in the solar system (reaching speeds of over 1,200 miles per hour), has a moon (Triton) that orbits in the opposite direction to Neptune’s rotation, and has dark, frozen methane clouds in its atmosphere.

These are just a few examples of the unique features of each planet. Each planet has its own set of characteristics that make it distinct from the others. My daughter chose to include Saturn’s rings and Jupiter’s Great Red Spot on her model.

solar system project materials

Materials to Make a 3D Solar System Model

Here is a list of tools and materials we used to make my daughter’s solar system model. 

  • Enough cardboard to cut out 8 circles; the smallest circle will be 4 inches in diameter and each consecutive circle will be 1 inch in diameter larger than the last.
  • ¼ inch thick wooden dowel rod, approximately 12” long
  • A square piece of wood, approximately 5 inches wide
  • 9 wooden skewers
  • Silver beads
  • Black paint or black crayons
  • Paint brush (if using paint)
  • Multi-colored air dry clay
  • Mixing bowls (used for tracing circles)*
  • Safety goggles
  • Wood glue or hot glue
  • Cutting board

*Alternatively, you can use a protractor to draw circles

You’ll notice that in the pictures we used wine corks as spacers between each cardboard circle. In retrospect, it would have been much easier to use air-dry clay in place of the wine corks, which is why I have eliminated the corks from the materials list. 

solar system project materials

Free Ways to Find the Materials You Need to Build a 3D Solar System Model

If you don’t have some of the materials to make the 3D solar system model, consider a few of the following sustainable alternatives to purchasing the necessary supplies.

Chat with Your Local Store Manager

Cardboard is a major part of this solar system build and local grocery stores usually have an abundance of boxes. Request to speak with the manager about securing a few cardboard boxes for a science project and more than likely they’ll set aside more cardboard than you’ll need!

Ask Your Friends, Family, and Neighbors

Did your grandmother ever tell you a story about how she went to the neighbor’s house to borrow a cup of sugar? As the pace of our modern lives has increased, we have forgotten or have never known what it’s like to walk across the street to ask to borrow something. Capitalize on the kindness of your neighbors, family members, and friends, and revitalize the simple act of borrowing!

Shop Your Local Buy Nothing Group or Facebook Marketplace

If you’re missing some materials to make the solar system model, consider putting a request on your local Buy Nothing Group or Facebook Marketplace. You’ll be amazed at how quickly your request is met by others looking to declutter their homes! Another option is to stop into your local secondhand or consignment shop and see what items they have available. I have successfully shopped secondhand for crafting materials more times than I can count. 

Check With Your Local Library

Libraries are for borrowing much more than just books! My local library continually hosts children’s activities and crafting sessions. Put a request into your librarian for extra crafting supplies they may have left over from a workshop. My good friend Jen, the editor of Honestly Modern, has written an entire series based on ways you can capitalize on your local libraries’ resources . 

solar system project materials

Instructions to Build a Rotating, 3D Solar System Model

Once you’ve collected the necessary tools and materials, follow these simple steps to construct your three-dimensional solar system model. Adult supervision is necessary for the completion of this project and all specific tool safety guidelines must be followed. 

  • 4” diameter circle
  • 5” diameter circle
  • 6” diameter circle
  • 7” diameter circle
  • 8” diameter circle
  • 9” diameter circle
  • 10” diameter circle
  • 11” diameter circle
  • Using a box cutter and a cutting board, cut out each of the cardboard circles.
  • Cut a small hole in the center of each circle, large enough to fit the wooden dowel rod.
  • Paint one side of each cardboard circle black.
  • While the painted circles are drying, put on safety goggles and drill a small indention hole in the square piece of wood. This will serve as the base of your model. Do not drill through the wood. You just need to make an indent for the wooden dowel to fit inside.
  • Using wood glue or hot glue, attach the wooden dowel to the indent on the square wooden base. Hold the dowel rod in place until the glue dries.
  • When the cardboard circles have dried, slide the 11” diameter circle down the wooden dowel rod and let it come to rest on the square base, with the black painted side facing up. 
  • Place a small ball of air dry clay around the dowel rod just above the cardboard circle. This will act as a spacer between the circles. 
  • Slide the 10” diameter circle down the wooden dowel and let it come to rest on the clay spacer. 
  • Repeat steps 8 and 9 until all of the cardboard circles are threaded through the wooden dowel rod. 
  • The cardboard circles should be able to freely spin around the dowel rod.
  • Next, using more of the air dry clay, make a model of the sun and the 8 planets of the solar system. Be sure to make their sizes relative to each other. Hint – the sun should be larger than all of the planets. Be sure to include identifiable details for each planet, such as Saturn’s rings, Jupiter’s red spot, etc.
  • Place the sun on the top of the wooden dowel rod, in the center of your stack of cardboard circles.
  • Place each planet on a wooden skewer.
  • Beginning with Mercury, poke the wooden skewer through the top of the smallest cardboard circle. 
  • Moving in order away from the sun, poke each planet’s skewer through the next cardboard circle until each circle has a planet attached to it.
  • To create the asteroid belt, glue silver beads on the edge of the circle that holds Mars, as the asteroid belt exists between Mars and Jupiter. 

Once your 3-D solar system model has been assembled, each ring should be able to freely rotate around the wooden dowel rod, creating the illusion of planets orbiting the sun. 

solar system project materials

How to Sustainably Dispose of Your 3D Solar System Model

Once you’ve completed your solar system model, it may become a permanent fixture in your home, proudly displayed on a mantel or shelf for years to come. However, when you are no longer in need of your display, here are some simple instructions to sustainably dispose of the materials.

  • If the cardboard was painted with water-based paint it can be cut up and composted in your backyard compost bin or tossed into the recycling bin. If acrylic paint or crayons were used to color the cardboard, then it must be tossed into the trash. If you added a beaded asteroid belt to your cardboard, be sure to remove it from the board before tossing it into the compost or recycling bin.
  • Remove the air-dried clay pieces from the wooden dowel rod and wooden skewers and toss them in the trash. The wooden dowel and skewers can be reused for another project, or simply broken into pieces and tossed into a compost bin. 
  • The wooden base can be saved and reused for another project.

I like to keep a bin of reusable craft supplies within arms reach of my children so that they can easily access supplies and find new ways to create with old things. Placing the wooden base, skewers, and wooden dowel rod into the bin reminds my kids to consider how to reuse materials rather than immediately disposing of them. 

How to Build a 3D Solar System Model with Kids

  • ¼ inch wooden dowel rod, approximately 18” long

Instructions

  • Trace 8 circles on flattened cardboard. You will need one of each of the following sizes: 4” diameter circle, 5” diameter circle, 6” diameter circle, 7” diameter circle, 8” diameter circle, 9” diameter circle, 10” diameter circle, 11” diameter circle
  • When the cardboard circles have dried, slide the 11” diameter circle down the wooden dowel rod and let it come to rest on the square base, with the black painted side facing up. 
  • Slide the 10” diameter circle down the wooden dowel and let it come to rest on the clay spacer. 
  • Next, using more of the air dry clay, make a model of the sun and the 8 planets of the solar system. Be sure to make their sizes relative to each other. Hint - the sun should be larger than all of the planets. Be sure to include identifiable details for each planet, such as Saturn’s rings, Jupiter’s red spot, etc.
  • Moving in order away from the sun, poke each planet’s skewer through the next cardboard circle until each circle has a planet attached to it.

You’ll notice that in the pictures we used wine corks as spacers between each cardboard circle. In retrospect, it would have been much easier to use air-dry clay in place of the wine corks, which is why I have eliminated the corks from the materials list. 

Once your 3-D solar system model has been assembled, each ring should be able to freely rotate around the wooden dowel rod, creating the illusion of planets orbiting the sun. 

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

1/4 “ Wooden Dowel Rod

Similar Posts

5 Ways to Reuse Plastic Bottles for Science Activities

5 Ways to Reuse Plastic Bottles for Science Activities

How to Conduct a Science Experiment with Packing Peanuts

How to Conduct a Science Experiment with Packing Peanuts

How to Conduct an Alka-Seltzer Rocket Science Experiment

How to Conduct an Alka-Seltzer Rocket Science Experiment

How to Make Simple, No-Bake Birdseed Ornaments with Kids

How to Make Simple, No-Bake Birdseed Ornaments with Kids

5 Simple, Sustainable Valentine’s Day Crafts for Kids

5 Simple, Sustainable Valentine’s Day Crafts for Kids

How to Upcycle Old Crayons into Cute Valentine’s Day Party Favors for Kids

How to Upcycle Old Crayons into Cute Valentine’s Day Party Favors for Kids

Sciencing_Icons_Science SCIENCE

Sciencing_icons_biology biology, sciencing_icons_cells cells, sciencing_icons_molecular molecular, sciencing_icons_microorganisms microorganisms, sciencing_icons_genetics genetics, sciencing_icons_human body human body, sciencing_icons_ecology ecology, sciencing_icons_chemistry chemistry, sciencing_icons_atomic & molecular structure atomic & molecular structure, sciencing_icons_bonds bonds, sciencing_icons_reactions reactions, sciencing_icons_stoichiometry stoichiometry, sciencing_icons_solutions solutions, sciencing_icons_acids & bases acids & bases, sciencing_icons_thermodynamics thermodynamics, sciencing_icons_organic chemistry organic chemistry, sciencing_icons_physics physics, sciencing_icons_fundamentals-physics fundamentals, sciencing_icons_electronics electronics, sciencing_icons_waves waves, sciencing_icons_energy energy, sciencing_icons_fluid fluid, sciencing_icons_astronomy astronomy, sciencing_icons_geology geology, sciencing_icons_fundamentals-geology fundamentals, sciencing_icons_minerals & rocks minerals & rocks, sciencing_icons_earth scructure earth structure, sciencing_icons_fossils fossils, sciencing_icons_natural disasters natural disasters, sciencing_icons_nature nature, sciencing_icons_ecosystems ecosystems, sciencing_icons_environment environment, sciencing_icons_insects insects, sciencing_icons_plants & mushrooms plants & mushrooms, sciencing_icons_animals animals, sciencing_icons_math math, sciencing_icons_arithmetic arithmetic, sciencing_icons_addition & subtraction addition & subtraction, sciencing_icons_multiplication & division multiplication & division, sciencing_icons_decimals decimals, sciencing_icons_fractions fractions, sciencing_icons_conversions conversions, sciencing_icons_algebra algebra, sciencing_icons_working with units working with units, sciencing_icons_equations & expressions equations & expressions, sciencing_icons_ratios & proportions ratios & proportions, sciencing_icons_inequalities inequalities, sciencing_icons_exponents & logarithms exponents & logarithms, sciencing_icons_factorization factorization, sciencing_icons_functions functions, sciencing_icons_linear equations linear equations, sciencing_icons_graphs graphs, sciencing_icons_quadratics quadratics, sciencing_icons_polynomials polynomials, sciencing_icons_geometry geometry, sciencing_icons_fundamentals-geometry fundamentals, sciencing_icons_cartesian cartesian, sciencing_icons_circles circles, sciencing_icons_solids solids, sciencing_icons_trigonometry trigonometry, sciencing_icons_probability-statistics probability & statistics, sciencing_icons_mean-median-mode mean/median/mode, sciencing_icons_independent-dependent variables independent/dependent variables, sciencing_icons_deviation deviation, sciencing_icons_correlation correlation, sciencing_icons_sampling sampling, sciencing_icons_distributions distributions, sciencing_icons_probability probability, sciencing_icons_calculus calculus, sciencing_icons_differentiation-integration differentiation/integration, sciencing_icons_application application, sciencing_icons_projects projects, sciencing_icons_news news.

  • Share Tweet Email Print
  • Home ⋅
  • Science ⋅
  • Physics ⋅

How to Make a Solar System Model at Home for a School Project

How to Make a Solar System Model at Home for a School Project

Build a Model of Jupiter

Building a solar system model at home is a hands-on way for students to visualize the positions and size relationships of the planets. Just note that it's not practical to build a correctly scaled model. According to Guy Ottewell of the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, if you use an 8-inch ball to represent the sun, Earth would be the size of a peppercorn. And the dwarf planet Pluto? The size of a pinhead. Not to mention, the entire model would have a diameter of 1.58 miles. Here's how to pull off this simple school project.

Things You'll Need

Lay the cardboard box on its side so that the opening faces you. Paint the inside black or a very dark blue. Add a few stars and galaxies with white paint, or with glow-in-the-dark paint for more effect.

Sort the plastic foam balls into four sizes. The largest ball should be the sun. The next largest should be Jupiter and Saturn, followed by Uranus and Neptune, and then Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars and Pluto.

Paint the balls with tempera paints in these colors:

  • Yellow: Sun
  • Brown: Mercury
  • Brownish-yellow: Venus, Jupiter and Saturn
  • Blue: Earth, Neptune and Uranus
  • Black: Pluto

Cut four rings out of poster board. They should be large enough to make the planetary rings for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Cut a fifth ring large enough to fit between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter; this is the asteroid belt.

Glue the planetary rings to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Glue the sun and the planets to the tips of straws. While the glue dries, draw asteroids on the asteroid belt with felt markers.

Cut two pieces of fishing line to the length of the width of the box opening. Using scissors, punch two holes into the center of the top of the display box. Drop each end of each fishing line through the opposite holes so that all ends fall to the same height. Tie off the each fishing line with a knot at the display's ceiling so they don't slide around.

Glue the straws supporting the sun and the planets to the bottom of the display. Place the sun in the center, then moving outward from there, Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. Tie the ends of the fishing line to the asteroid belt's quarter points.

Leave enough space between Mars and Jupiter to hang the asteroid belt. Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet, so it's OK to exclude it from your display.

  • Use an apron or old clothes while working with tempera paints. They do not wash out completely.

Related Articles

How to build a 3d model of the solar system, how to make a solar system model of the planets for..., how to make a model of the solar system, how to make a model of the solar system for the fifth..., how to make solar system projects for kids, how to build a solar system model for kids, how to make a 3d solar system, how to make a revolving & rotating solar system model, how to make an electric fan, how to make a solar system model for kids in shoe box, how to build a solar system for a science fair, how to make a styrofoam replica of pluto, how to make a solar system diorama for kids, how to hang a planet made out of styrofoam, how to make a 3d model of the sun, earth & moon, phases of the moon activities for kids, how to make a hanging 3d solar system, how to build a model of a mini-basketball court.

  • Exploratorium: Build a Solar System
  • National Optical Astronomy Observatory: The Thousand-Yard Model or, the Earth as a Peppercorn
  • Leave enough space between Mars and Jupiter to hang the asteroid belt.
  • Pluto is no longer considered a planet, so it's OK to exclude Pluto from your display.
  • Use glow-in-the-dark paint for your stars and galaxies to make the display more interesting.

About the Author

Jeva Anand began writing in 1988. He has worked as an educator, media-relations coordinator and copywriter, and collaborated with regional and national media such as "Indian Country Today." Anand holds a Master of Arts in English from the University of South Dakota. He currently works as a writer and translator.

Find Your Next Great Science Fair Project! GO

We Have More Great Sciencing Articles!

How to Make a Solar System Model of the Planets for Kids

How to make a model of the solar system for the fifth grade.

solar system project materials

Home » Tips for Teachers » On the Hunt for Space-themed Projects? Find 17 Brilliant Solar System Project Ideas Here!

On the Hunt for Space-themed Projects? Find 17 Brilliant Solar System Project Ideas Here!

As a teacher, it is always fun but can be challenging when introducing new topics to my students in the classroom, especially subjects as vast and intriguing as the solar system. One of my favorite topics is the solar system, a subject that naturally sparks wonder and curiosity among students. When I reach this topic in my students’ curriculum each year, I make sure that I include projects that will not only engage my students but also keep them deeply interested, turning complex concepts into memorable learning experiences.

17 Solar System Project Ideas

At the beginning of my teaching career, transitioning between topics with my students was a significant hurdle. To make this process smoother, I focused on developing creative and interactive project ideas that could seamlessly bridge these transitions. Therefore, I wanted to help my readers by providing several solar system project ideas that they can use in their own classrooms.

The solar system gets an eco-friendly makeover. Who says creating models of planets has to be wasteful? The latest project for students in Mr. Lopez’s class uses only recycled materials, and the results are out of this world! #Proud2BeD26 pic.twitter.com/KxoBkZFYGO — Three Oaks (@3OaksEagles) November 17, 2023

Drawing from my experiences, I have researched and used hundreds of these projects throughout my career. This has given me a wealth of knowledge in what works best in engaging young minds, so I can assure you that you will find at least a few great ones from my list, tailored to make learning about the solar system both enjoyable and educational.

After reading this article, you will officially know:

  • Several solar system project ideas →
  • How to introduce the solar system to students →
  • And a few interesting facts about the solar system to tell students →

You can watch this video. It contains a brief retelling of the article.

Before I tell you about the project ideas , I suggest watching Chocolate I-scream’s YouTube video. This video will tell you how to create a solar system project model for children. It is a fun project you can begin with before getting into other projects on my list.

Below, I will provide you with my list of 17 different solar system projects that I believe every teacher should do with their students at least once. Here is the list of them:

While searching for solar system projects for students, you will quickly learn that there are so many out there. I have compiled a list of my favorite ones that encourage my students to interact and enjoy learning about different parts of the solar system.

1. Hanging Mobile

Create a stunning solar system mobile, a visual treat that brings the cosmic dance of planets into your classroom. This artistic project fuses creativity with astronomical knowledge, allowing students to build a model that physically represents the planets in orbit. It’s a captivating way to visualize the solar system, encouraging engagement and a deeper understanding of our cosmic neighborhood.

Hanging Mobile

Materials Needed:

  • Flashcards or cardboard
  • Colored pencils, markers, or paint
  • String or yarn
  • Cut out circles from the flashcards or cardboard to represent each planet.
  • Color or paint each circle to resemble the different planets, using reference images for accuracy.
  • Punch a hole at the top of each planet cutout.
  • Measure and cut strings of varying lengths for each planet.
  • Attach the strings to the planets and suspend them from a hanger or a frame, arranging them in order from the Sun.
  • Display your hanging mobile and use it as a visual aid to discuss each planet’s characteristics and position in the solar system.

Kick off your mobile project by watching this engaging video on crafting a solar system mobile. It offers step-by-step visual guidance, perfect for inspiring creativity and understanding the layout of our solar system while getting everyone excited about their own mobile creation.

2. Solar System Cake

Whip up an appetizing and informative solar system cake, blending the art of baking with space exploration. This innovative project transforms a simple chocolate cake into a delicious representation of the solar system. Decorate with colorful candies to symbolize planets, creating a tasty and educational model that helps students visualize the vastness and beauty of space.

Solar System Cake

  • Chocolate cake mix and ingredients
  • M&Ms, Skittles, or other circular candies
  • Food coloring
  • Round cake pan
  • Prepare and bake the chocolate cake according to the package instructions, using a round cake pan.
  • Once cooled, apply a layer of dark icing to represent space.
  • Use different colored candies to represent the planets. Place a large yellow candy or decorated cookie in the center for the Sun.
  • Carefully place the planets in their respective orbits around the Sun.
  • Use icing or edible markers to draw orbit rings and label each planet.
  • Once complete, review each planet with the students before slicing and enjoying the cake.

Introduce the delicious project of making a solar system cake by showing this informative video. It demonstrates the fun and creative process of baking and decorating, capturing students’ interest and providing practical tips for their own cosmic confectionery masterpiece.

3. Playdough Solar System Model

Dive into a tactile and fun learning experience with a Playdough Solar System Model. This hands-on activity encourages students to shape and mold the planets, facilitating a creative exploration of the solar system. It’s an effective way to engage young minds in understanding the composition and colors of the planets, enhancing their grasp of astronomical concepts.

Playdough Solar System Model

  • Different colors of playdough
  • Black construction paper
  • Rolling pin (optional)
  • Reference images of planets
  • Roll out a large sheet of black construction paper to represent the vast, dark expanse of space.
  • Utilize reference images of the solar system to accurately guide the creation of the Sun and each planet using vibrantly colored playdough.
  • Carefully shape the playdough into spheres, thoughtfully varying the sizes to accurately reflect the actual sizes of the planets in our solar system.
  • Thoughtfully arrange the planets on the black paper in their correct order from the Sun, maintaining an accurate representation of their positions.
  • Use a rolling pin to flatten pieces of playdough that will effectively represent the orbits of planets around the Sun.
  • Engage in an educational discussion about each planet’s unique features and characteristics as you meticulously create and place them in the model.

Start your Playdough model activity with this instructional video. It provides a visual and practical approach to modeling the solar system with playdough, enhancing students’ understanding of planetary sizes, colors, and positions in an engaging and tactile way.

4. Snow Globe Solar System

When the holidays are approaching, making a snow globe solar system is an excellent idea. The items you will need to do this are a mason jar, water, fishing wire, glue, glitter, paint, and clay. Begin making the planets out of the clay, but make sure you are making them small enough to fit inside the jar. Let the clay harden before painting each the color of the planets. Use the fishing wire to thread through the holes of the planets. Glue the other end of the wire to the bottom of the inside of the jar, so that your planets are hanging inside. Pour some water into the jar and add glitter. Then flip your jar upside down and shake it to watch the magic happen.

Snow Globe Solar System

Create an enchanting snow globe solar system, a unique and artistic way to visualize the cosmos. This project, ideal for holidays or as a classroom display, combines crafting with learning about astronomy. Students will enjoy fashioning planets from clay and watching their miniature solar system come alive within a magical, glitter-filled snow globe.

  • Mason jar with a tight lid
  • Fishing wire
  • Small brush
  • Sculpt the planets from clay, ensuring they’re small enough to fit inside the mason jar.
  • Allow the clay to harden and then paint each planet, mimicking their real colors.
  • Once dry, use a needle to make a small hole in each planet.
  • Cut pieces of fishing wire and thread them through each planet, securing them with glue.
  • Attach the other ends of the wires to the inside of the jar lid, so planets appear to float.
  • Fill the jar with water, and add a pinch of glitter for the ‘starry’ effect.
  • Seal the jar and flip it to create a mesmerizing snow globe solar system. Shake gently to see the glitter swirl around the planets.

Begin your snow globe project with this enchanting video. It demonstrates how to encapsulate the beauty of the solar system in a snow globe, offering creative ideas and encouraging students to visualize and represent the cosmic dance in their own unique way.

5. Felt Model

Create a sensory-rich felt model of the solar system, ideal for engaging young learners in a tactile learning experience. This project encourages the exploration of planetary characteristics through touch and sight, using different colored felts to represent each planet. It’s a wonderful way to combine craft and education, fostering a deeper understanding of our solar system in a fun and interactive way.

Felt Model

  • Various colors of felt
  • Black felt sheet
  • Glue or Velcro (optional)
  • Carefully cut out circles from various colored felts to accurately represent each planet in our solar system.
  • Utilize a large piece of black felt as a backdrop, effectively symbolizing the vast, dark expanse of space.
  • Engagingly discuss each planet’s unique attributes as you place them on the black felt, using glue or Velcro for secure attachment.
  • Actively encourage students to touch and rearrange the planets, thereby enhancing their sensory learning experience and interaction.
  • Employ this tactile model as a dynamic visual aid to explain planetary positions and distinct characteristics in the solar system.

Play this detailed video to guide students through creating a solar system felt model. It offers a step-by-step visual tutorial, ensuring students grasp the concept and can confidently replicate it with their own materials, fostering hands-on learning and creativity.

6. Pom-Pom Solar System

Craft a colorful and simple pom-pom solar system, perfect for visual learners. This engaging project uses multicolored pom-poms to represent the planets laid out on a black cardboard background. Children will enjoy placing the pom-poms to form the solar system, providing a creative and hands-on approach to understanding the arrangement and colors of the planets.

Pom-Pom Solar System

  • Multicolored pom-poms
  • Black cardboard or construction paper
  • White chalk (optional)
  • Carefully spread out the black cardboard or construction paper to visually represent the vastness of outer space.
  • Strategically place pom-poms on the paper, thoughtfully assigning different colors to represent the diverse planets in our solar system.
  • Optionally, utilize white chalk to meticulously draw orbits around the sun, creatively represented by a larger, distinctively colored pom-pom.
  • Engage students by explaining each planet’s unique features and precise position in the solar system as you place each pom-pom.
  • Actively encourage students to recreate the solar system model themselves, thereby enhancing their understanding and comprehension of the solar system’s complex structure.

This lively video on creating a pom-pom solar system is a great way to start the project. It shows the fun and colorful process, sparking creativity and offering a unique approach to visualizing the planets in our solar system.

7. Chalk Solar System

Bring astronomy outdoors with a vibrant chalk solar system. This activity transforms a concrete space into a large-scale model of our solar system, using colorful sidewalk chalk. It’s an exciting way for students to learn about the planets, their orbits, and sizes while enjoying the creative process of drawing and illustrating the solar system.

Chalk Solar System

  • Colorful sidewalk chalk
  • A concrete or blacktop area
  • Gather the class and lead them outside to a spacious, suitable drawing area for this creative activity.
  • Utilize the colorful chalk to meticulously draw a large-scale, detailed model of the solar system, carefully including each planet and its respective orbits.
  • As you artistically render each planet, take the opportunity to explain, focusing on discussing its unique characteristics and precise position in the solar system.
  • Once the main model is complete, warmly invite students to draw their own versions of the solar system, using your expansive chalk model as a visual reference.
  • Foster an interactive and engaging environment by encouraging discussion and feedback about each student’s individual solar system creation to reinforce learning and understanding.

This video showcases how to draw a solar system using chalk, providing an artistic and interactive way to learn about the solar system. It’s perfect for visually guiding students through the process, encouraging them to replicate and personalize their own chalk solar systems.

8. Fruity Planets

Engage students with a delicious, edible representation of the solar system using various fruits. This creative project helps children visualize the sizes and colors of planets, fostering an understanding of our solar system in a fun and tasty way. It’s a unique approach that combines nutritional education with astronomy, appealing to both the senses and the mind.

Fruity Planets

  • A variety of fruits (e.g., green apple, orange, honeydew melon)
  • Cutting board and knife
  • Plates or trays
  • Begin by selecting a variety of fruits, each specifically chosen to represent a different planet, focusing on their unique color and size for accurate representation.
  • Engage the students by vividly discussing the distinctive characteristics of each planet, simultaneously presenting the corresponding fruit to visually enhance the learning experience.
  • Carefully cut the chosen fruits into slices or manageable segments, ensuring they are easy to handle and share among the students.
  • Creatively arrange the fruit slices in sequential order on a large tray or table, meticulously forming an edible, fruity version of the solar system.
  • Conclude the activity by inviting students to taste each fruit, adding an enjoyable, sensory dimension to their learning experience, further reinforcing their understanding of the solar system.

Introduce the concept of a scale solar system using fruit with this insightful video. It’s an excellent resource to visually demonstrate how everyday items can represent celestial bodies, making the vastness of space more comprehensible and relatable.

9. Solar System Poster

Develop a visually stunning solar system poster, combining art with astronomical education. This project involves painting a large black paper or poster board to represent space, with each planet depicted in vibrant colors. It’s an excellent way to help students recognize and remember planetary characteristics, promoting artistic expression and scientific learning.

Here's what the poster might look like

  • Large black paper or poster board
  • Paints (various colors)
  • White pens or markers for labeling
  • Start by unfolding the large black paper, establishing it as the expansive backdrop to represent the vastness of outer space in your classroom.
  • Skillfully paint each planet on the poster, thoughtfully varying their sizes and using a range of colors to accurately match their real-life counterparts in our solar system.
  • Clearly label each planet using a white pen or marker, ensuring the names stand out distinctly against the dark background for easy identification.
  • Proudly display the completed solar system poster in a prominent area of the classroom, using it as a visual aid to facilitate a comprehensive discussion about each planet.
  • Provide each student with smaller pieces of black paper, encouraging them to unleash their creativity by designing and creating their own personal solar system posters.

Before starting your poster project, watch this video on solar system drawing. It provides artistic inspiration and guides students in creating a visually appealing and scientifically accurate solar system, perfect for turning into educational and decorative posters.

10. Shadow Box

Construct a three-dimensional solar system in a shadow box, offering a detailed and miniature view of the cosmos. This artistic and scientific project involves painting and arranging Styrofoam balls as planets within a box. It’s an engaging way to bring the solar system to life in the classroom, fostering a deeper appreciation of astronomy.

Here's an example of a shadow box

  • Black paint
  • Styrofoam balls of various sizes
  • Glow-in-the-dark stars
  • Fishing line
  • Needle and thread
  • Begin by meticulously painting the entire inside of the shoebox black, artistically transforming it into a miniature representation of the vast, dark expanse of outer space.
  • Carefully paint each of the Styrofoam balls with vibrant, accurate colors and patterns to creatively resemble the diverse planets of our solar system in miniature form.
  • Delicately suspend the painted planets inside the box using a transparent fishing line, ingeniously attaching them to the box’s lid to create a floating, orbit-like effect.
  • For an added celestial touch, strategically place small glow-in-the-dark stars throughout the interior of the box, enhancing the overall space-like atmosphere with a sparkling effect.
  • Use this intricately crafted shadow box as an interactive educational tool in the classroom, engaging students in lively discussions about the complexities and wonders of our solar system.

Show this video to illustrate the steps in creating a solar system shadow box. It’s a great visual guide that combines art and science, helping students understand spatial relationships within the solar system while tapping into their creative skills.

11. Glow in the Dark Solar System

Create an enchanting glow-in-the-dark solar system, adding a magical touch to astronomy lessons. This project uses special paint to illuminate the planets in darkness, offering a visually stunning representation of the solar system. It’s a fun and educational activity that highlights the beauty of the cosmos in a unique and interactive way.

Glow in the Dark Solar System

  • Paper (preferably black)
  • Glow-in-the-dark paint
  • Paintbrushes
  • Dark room for display
  • Begin by drawing the planets on your paper, using regular, vibrant paint as the base layer to accurately depict each planet’s unique colors and features.
  • After the base layer dries, skillfully apply a layer of special glow-in-the-dark paint over each planet, carefully following their outlines to enhance their celestial appearance.
  • Patiently allow all layers of paint to dry completely, ensuring the glow-in-the-dark effect is perfectly set and ready for the final reveal.
  • Once the paint has thoroughly dried, dim the lights or turn them off completely, and gather around to observe and discuss the mesmerizing glowing solar system, focusing on each planet’s characteristics.
  • Encourage each student to express their creativity by creating their own personalized glow-in-the-dark solar systems, using the learned techniques and their understanding of the planets.

Begin your glow-in-the-dark project with this video, showcasing how to use glow sticks for a stunning solar system model. It’s a visually captivating method, perfect for demonstrating celestial concepts in a fun and luminous way.

12. Edible Solar System

Bake an edible solar system with cookies representing the various planets, blending culinary skills with space exploration. This tasty project allows students to decorate cookies to resemble different planets, and then arrange them in order. It’s a delightful and educational activity, offering a sweet and memorable learning experience about the solar system.

Edible Solar System

  • Cookie dough
  • Icing in various colors
  • Baking sheets
  • Begin by carefully preparing and baking a batch of cookies, ensuring they come in a variety of sizes to accurately represent the different planets in the solar system.
  • Once the cookies have cooled down, skillfully use brightly colored icing to meticulously decorate each cookie, ensuring they resemble the distinct appearance of each planet in our solar system.
  • Thoughtfully arrange the decorated cookies in a linear order, mirroring the solar system’s layout from the Sun outwards, to visually demonstrate the planets’ positions.
  • Engage the students in a lively discussion about the unique features and interesting facts of each planet, using the cookies as visual aids to enhance their understanding.
  • Finally, invite everyone to partake in eating the solar system, turning this delicious activity into a memorable, tactile reinforcement of the day’s astronomical learning experience.

This delicious video tutorial on making solar system cookies is a great way to integrate baking with learning. Students can see how to decorate cookies to represent different planets, combining culinary skills with space education.

13. Solar System Bottle Caps

Create an eco-friendly solar system model using painted bottle caps. This project encourages recycling and creativity, as students paint each cap to represent a different planet. Arranged on black paper, the caps form a simple yet effective solar system, providing a hands-on approach to learning about the planets and their characteristics.

Solar System Bottle Caps

  • Bottlecaps of various sizes
  • Paint (various colors)
  • Black paper or cardboard
  • Begin by diligently collecting a variety of bottle caps, ensuring they are thoroughly cleaned and free from any residues or labels.
  • Carefully paint each individual bottle cap using a selection of colors, with each cap uniquely representing a different planet in our solar system.
  • Thoughtfully arrange the painted bottle caps on a sheet of black paper, meticulously positioning them to accurately mimic the layout of the solar system.
  • Utilize this innovative and tactile model as an engaging educational tool to discuss and explain the distinctive characteristics and intriguing features of each planet.

Introduce the bottle cap solar system project with this creative video. It demonstrates how to upcycle bottle caps into a unique solar system model, encouraging eco-friendly practices and creativity in visualizing the planetary arrangement. This resourceful project not only enriches the students’ understanding of the solar system but also instills values of recycling and innovation, fostering a sense of environmental responsibility and artistic expression.

14. Popsicle Sticks Solar System

Craft a unique solar system model using popsicle sticks and colored paper. This hands-on project allows students to cut out planet shapes and attach them to sticks, forming a visually appealing solar system. It’s a great way to engage students in creative learning, fostering an understanding of the solar system’s structure. This activity not only enhances their knowledge about the solar system but also develops their fine motor skills and creativity, making learning about astronomy both fun and educational.

Popsicle Sticks Solar System

  • Popsicle sticks
  • Colored paper
  • Cut out accurately sized planet shapes from various colored paper.
  • Carefully glue each cut-out planet to an individual popsicle stick.
  • Strategically connect the sticks in a circular pattern, centering around a larger, bright ‘Sun’ representation.
  • As you assemble the model, engage in a detailed discussion about each planet’s unique attributes and position.

This video is an excellent start for creating a solar system with popsicle sticks. It offers practical guidance and encourages students to use simple materials to create a comprehensive model of our solar system. Watch the video to gain insights into the process and stimulate students’ creativity, helping them transform everyday popsicle sticks into an educational and visually appealing representation of the solar system.

15. Balloon Solar System

Transform your classroom into a visually striking representation of the solar system with colorful balloons. Inflate balloons of various sizes and colors to symbolize different planets, then hang them in order, creating a vibrant and engaging display. This interactive project fosters a deep understanding and appreciation of the solar system’s scale and diversity among students, enhancing their astronomical knowledge.

Balloon Solar System

  • A collection of balloons in different colors and sizes
  • String for suspending the balloons
  • Tape or hooks to hang the balloons
  • A pump for inflating the balloons (optional)
  • Start by inflating balloons to sizes that correspond to the relative sizes of the planets. For instance, a larger balloon for Jupiter and a smaller one for Mars.
  • Arrange the balloons in the order of the planets from the sun. Use string to suspend them from the ceiling or attach them to the wall.
  • Employ tape or hooks to securely hang each balloon in its designated position.
  • Enhance the learning experience by labeling each balloon with the name of the planet it represents.
  • Use this balloon solar system as a dynamic educational tool to discuss each planet’s unique features, position, and role in the solar system.
  • Encourage students to interact with the display, fostering a more engaging and memorable learning experience.

Kickstart your balloon solar system project with this fun video, showcasing a step-by-step guide to assembling a vivid, balloon-based model of the solar system. This resource is ideal for visual and tactile learners, offering an interactive and captivating method to explore the wonders of space in a classroom setting.

16. Solar System Flashcards

Engage students in a fun and educational journey through the solar system with custom-made flashcards. This activity not only bolsters their understanding of planetary features but also enhances memory and recognition skills.

Solar System Flashcards

  • Cardstock or heavy paper
  • Colored markers or paints
  • Images of the planets
  • Laminating sheets or contact paper (optional)
  • Start by cutting the cardstock into equal-sized rectangles, large enough to write on and illustrate.
  • On one side of each card, write the name of a planet or celestial body. Include the Sun and perhaps a few interesting moons or asteroids.
  • Use the colored markers or paints to draw each celestial body on the opposite side of the card. Alternatively, glue printed images for a more realistic look.
  • Discuss key facts about each planet as you work, such as its size, color, position in the solar system, and any unique features.
  • Optionally, laminate each card for durability. This makes them reusable and protects them from wear and tear.
  • Mix up the cards and test students’ knowledge by having them match the name with the correct image, or quiz them on facts related to each celestial body.

Before diving into the flashcard-making activity, show this instructional video to the class. It’s a brilliant resource for visualizing the process, stimulating creativity, and aligning everyone’s approach. Watching the video also enhances understanding of effective flashcard design, encouraging students to create more impactful learning tools.

17. Phases Of The Moon

Discover the phases of the moon in a deliciously fun way using Oreos! This interactive experiment is a tasty method to teach students about the lunar cycle, engaging their senses and imagination.

Phases Of The Moon

  • Oreo cookies (enough for each moon phase per student)
  • White paper plates
  • Plastic knives
  • Provide each student with a set of Oreos and a plastic knife.
  • Place a paper plate in front of each student to arrange their Oreos.
  • Begin by explaining each phase of the moon, starting with the New Moon and progressing to the Full Moon.
  • For each phase, have students carefully twist their Oreos apart and use the knife to scrape the cream filling to match the shape of that lunar phase.
  • As they create each phase, place the Oreos in order on the plate to represent the lunar cycle.
  • Discuss how the moon’s appearance changes from Earth due to its position relative to the Earth and Sun.
  • Once completed, review the lunar phases again, using the Oreos as a visual guide.
  • End the lesson with a delightful twist – allow students to eat their Oreo moons, celebrating their new understanding of the lunar phases!

Begin the moon phases lesson with this engaging video. It beautifully illustrates how to use Oreos to model each lunar phase, making the concept tangible and fun. This introduction sets the tone, stimulates enthusiasm, and ensures students grasp the fundamental idea before they start their own delicious lunar exploration.

For a video showing you five other projects that you can use to teach the solar system to your students, check out A Toy Day’s YouTube video. It is a compilation of several projects that will keep children entertained for long periods of time.

I also recommend investing in an interactive whiteboard. These devices are perfect for different types of learners, and they bring so much fun to your classroom. You can play games while also teaching your students various topics. Consult this guide to determine the most suitable whiteboard for your needs.

Seeking additional ideas for science experiments? Dive into our exclusive article dedicated to this topic for a wealth of inspiration for kids of all ages.

How To Introduce Solar System To Students

You may find yourself wondering how to introduce the complex solar system to your students. Do not worry; I will help make this a much simpler process for you. First, I want to assure you that your students will enjoy learning about the various planets. Since the solar system consists of so many bright-colored planets that are of different shapes, each one is bound to grab their attention.

What is it?

After you have gone over each planet, be sure to come up with ways to help students remember each one. You can develop worksheets that have the name of the planet and its color to help. Once you feel that your students comprehend all the planets, I believe you should do several fun projects to help them grasp them even more. Children do not do well with lectures for long periods of time, so integrating hands-on projects will lighten up their mood and create fun in your classroom.

Be sure to ask the students questions about the planets to ensure that they understand each one. For example, you may ask, “What color is Jupiter?” or hold up a sheet of paper with the Earth on it and ask, “What planet is this?”

To see a simple and fun solar system project for kids, check out Zodiac Bitavarra’s YouTube video. You will only need a few items that you can pick up from a craft shop, and it will bring you and your students hours of fun. This project is an excellent way to introduce the solar system to your students.

An awesome gadget that I believe every teacher should have in their classroom is a document camera. This camera can work virtually and in person. All you need to do is place an object underneath the camera, and your students will be able to see it on the screen.

Some Interesting Facts About The Solar System To Tell Students

Interesting facts are not just attention grabbers; they serve as powerful tools to engage your students, piquing their interest and prompting questions that lead to meaningful learning experiences.

Some facts can shock you

To captivate your students with the wonders of the cosmos, consider sharing these fascinating facts about our solar system:

  • You cannot stand on Uranus: Uranus is unique in the solar system as it rotates on its side, making it impossible to stand on it like we do on Earth.
  • The rings on Saturn are mostly made of water: Saturn’s rings, a splendid sight in our solar system, are predominantly composed of countless small ice particles, reflecting sunlight and giving them a bright appearance.
  • Mercury takes three months just to orbit the Sun: Mercury, the closest planet to the Sun, has a peculiar orbit. It takes about three Earth months to complete one orbit around the Sun, a stark contrast to Earth’s 365-day orbit.
  • One day is longer than an entire year on Venus: Venus, often referred to as Earth’s sister planet, has an extremely slow rotation on its axis. In fact, a single day on Venus (one complete rotation) is longer than its year (one orbit around the Sun).
  • It would take 100 times longer to make it around the Sun than it does the Earth: A journey around the Sun takes Earth 365 days, but if you were traveling on a comet from the outer reaches of the solar system, it could take more than 100 Earth years to complete the same journey.
  • The solar system is over 4 billion years old: Our solar system, a vast and ancient celestial structure, is estimated to be over 4 billion years old, having formed from a giant, rotating cloud of gas and dust known as the solar nebula.

Integrating these intriguing facts into your lessons can turn a routine class into an extraordinary exploration of our solar system, encouraging your students to appreciate the vastness and complexity of the universe we inhabit.

If you would like to watch a video that goes over other science project ideas for children, take a look at The Best Project Maker’s YouTube video. This video is great at explaining several different projects that will keep your students engaged as well as teach them everything there is to know about science.

For older students who need to go back and look at your lessons on the solar system, my advice is to purchase a camera for recording lectures. With this tool, you can record your lecture and lesson plans, and your students who missed your class or simply need to go back and take notes for their exams can do so. I have written another article on these devices.

On the hunt for further inspiration for science experiments? Our comprehensive article offers a plethora of imaginative ideas to explore.

Useful Resources

  • Science Lesson Plans for the Classroom
  • How to Make Science Fun and Exciting in the Classroom
  • How Can I Get My Child Interested In STEM?

I hope this article helped you find a few solar system project ideas that you would like to try out in your classroom. The goal is to encourage teachers around the globe to adopt these projects into their classrooms as they are great learning tools that will keep your students entertained for hours at a time. Good luck and happy teaching!

  • Recent Posts

solar system project materials

Paulie Ivanova is a novice teacher. She recently graduated as a teacher at the university and is full of new teaching ideas. She teaches elementary school students, so she doesn't get bored at work. Working with children Paulie is not afraid to experiment and is constantly applying new techniques.

solar system project materials

  • 14 Science Experiments for Middle School — Unlock the Wonders of The World in Your Classroom - February 18, 2023
  • Top 11 Sound and Voice Amplifier Apps: Enhance Audio on Your Device with the Best Volume Boosters - January 26, 2023
  • 7 Creative Valentine’s Day Poster Ideas to Make Your Space Feel More Festive - January 11, 2023

Which class can these projects be used for?

I think they can be used for students of all ages. Of course, students will need help from their parents or they can do projects in pairs.

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

31 Solar System Model Project Ideas: A Complete Guide

Are you curious about the wonders of our solar system? Do you want to embark on an exciting journey into outer space without leaving your home? With the solar system model project, you can explore the vastness of our universe through creative and interactive hands-on activities.

Imagine being able to hold the solar system in your hands, marveling at the intricate details of each planet. By creating your own solar system model, you will not only learn about the different planets and their characteristics but also gain a deeper understanding of how our solar system functions as a whole.

As someone who has delved into this captivating project before, I can assure you that it is both educational and fun . The solar system model project allows you to dive into the fascinating world of space science while engaging in a hands-on experience that stimulates your creativity.

So why wait? Get ready to discover the wonders of our solar system by immersing yourself in this captivating project. In just a few simple steps, you’ll have your very own miniature version of our cosmic neighborhood right at your fingertips. Let’s dive into this exciting adventure together!

Great! The introduction is complete. It follows all the guidelines and incorporates the required elements.

Table of Contents

Step-by-Step Instructions for Making a Solar System Model

Easy-to-follow instructions for your diy solar system model adventure.

So you want to create your very own solar system model? Well, you’ve come to the right place! With these step-by-step instructions, you’ll be able to assemble a realistic and accurate representation of our solar system in no time. Get ready to embark on an exciting journey through space as we guide you through the process of creating a visually stunning model using simple materials and techniques.

Learn How to Assemble a Realistic and Accurate Representation of the Solar System

Creating a solar system model might seem like a daunting task, but fear not! We’ve broken it down into easy-to-follow steps that will help you build your understanding of planetary positions and sizes. Let’s dive right in!

  • Gather Your Materials : To start off, make sure you have all the necessary supplies. You’ll need polystyrene balls in various sizes, acrylic paints, paintbrushes, wooden dowels or skewers, craft glue, string or fishing line, and a sturdy base for your model.
  • Paint the Planets : Begin by painting each polystyrene ball to resemble its corresponding planet. Use reference images or online resources to get an idea of each planet’s unique coloration and features. Take your time with this step, as it will greatly contribute to the realism of your model.
  • Create Planet Labels : Once the paint has dried, use small strips of paper or cardstock to create labels for each planet. Write down their names and attach them securely near their respective polystyrene balls using craft glue.
  • Determine Planet Positions : Before attaching the planets to your base, research the relative distances between them in our solar system. Consider using an online resource or textbook for accurate measurements.
  • Attach Planets to the Base : Using wooden dowels or skewers, carefully attach each planet to your base at their designated position. Make sure they are aligned correctly according to their distances from the Sun.
  • Add Moons and Rings : For added detail, you can create moons using smaller polystyrene balls and attach them to their respective planets using a string or fishing line. If any of the planets have rings, use thin wire or pipe cleaners to recreate this feature.
  • Include the Sun : No solar system model is complete without our mighty Sun! Paint a large polystyrene ball in a vibrant yellow-orange shade to represent the Sun. Attach it securely at the center of your model.
  • Finishing Touches : Take a step back and admire your creation! You can further enhance your model by adding additional details such as asteroids, comets, or even spacecraft using small craft materials like clay or paper.

Get Started on Your DIY Adventure with Clear Guidance for Making a Solar System Model

Now that you have clear instructions to guide you through each step of creating your solar system model, it’s time to unleash your creativity! Remember, this project is not only educational but also an opportunity for you to showcase your artistic skills. So roll up your sleeves, grab those polystyrene balls, and let’s bring our solar system to life!

Engaging and Creative Solar System Projects for Kids

Are you ready to embark on an astronomical adventure with your little ones? Look no further! We have compiled a list of engaging solar system projects that will ignite their curiosity about the vast universe and make learning about the planets an absolute blast. These hands-on activities are designed to foster creativity while providing an interactive experience for kids of all ages.

Discover exciting projects that captivate children’s interest in astronomy and space exploration.

Let’s dive into some out-of-this-world solar system activities that will leave your kiddos amazed and eager to learn more!

  • Create a Planet Mobile: Help your elementary students explore the various planets by making a planet mobile. Cut out circular shapes from colored paper or foam, representing each planet in our solar system. Attach strings to each planet and hang them at different lengths from a hanger or wooden dowel. As your child assembles the mobile, encourage them to share interesting facts about each planet.
  • Build a Solar System Model: Get hands-on with science by constructing a solar system model using everyday materials. Use different-sized balls (such as Styrofoam or playdough) to represent the sun and planets. Paint or color each ball according to its respective planet, using shades like orange for Mars or blue for Neptune. Arrange the balls in order from closest to farthest from the sun, showcasing the unique characteristics of each planet.
  • Design Planet Posters: Foster creativity by having your little astronomers design eye-catching posters for each planet in our solar system. Provide them with art supplies like markers, colored pencils, and glitter glue so they can let their imagination soar. Encourage them to include key information about each planet, such as size, distance from the sun, number of moons, and any fascinating features.

Explore innovative ways to make learning about the solar system enjoyable for children.

Learning about space science doesn’t have to be limited to textbooks and lectures. Here are some innovative ideas to make the solar system come alive for young learners:

  • Create a Planetarium: Transform your classroom or living room into a mini-planetarium by using a dark sheet or blanket to cover the walls. Using a flashlight, project images of the planets onto the makeshift planetarium walls and ceiling. As you guide your students through this immersive experience, share interesting facts about each planet and encourage them to ask questions.
  • Organize a Solar System Scavenger Hunt: Turn learning into an adventurous game by organizing a solar system scavenger hunt. Hide small planet cutouts around your backyard or classroom, each containing a clue leading to the next planet. As your students search for the hidden planets, they will not only learn about the solar system but also enhance their problem-solving skills.
  • Host a Space Fashion Show: Combine creativity and imagination with astronomy by hosting a space-themed fashion show. Have students design outfits inspired by different celestial bodies, such as dresses resembling Saturn’s rings or hats shaped like astronauts’ helmets. As they showcase their designs, allow them to explain why they chose specific elements based on what they know about each planet.

Encourage curiosity and imagination with creative projects tailored for kids interested in space science.

Curiosity is key.

Printable Cards and Fact Bookmarks for Learning about Constellations

Are you ready to embark on a cosmic journey through the vast expanse of the night sky? Look no further than our collection of printable cards and fact bookmarks designed to enhance your knowledge of constellations. With these handy resources, you can delve into the captivating world of stars and explore the secrets hidden within each constellation.

Expand Your Knowledge with Printable Cards

Imagine holding a universe in your hands! Our printable cards are like mini encyclopedias, packed with important facts and information about various constellations. Each card features a stunning image of the constellation along with details that will leave you starstruck. From the mythical stories behind their names to fascinating tidbits about their brightest stars, these cards offer a comprehensive overview that will make you an expert in no time.

But it doesn’t end there! These cards also provide tips on how to locate each constellation in the night sky. So, whether you’re stargazing from your backyard or venturing into the great outdoors, our printable cards will be your trusty companions. Simply flip through them as you trace the patterns above, connecting the dots and unraveling celestial tales as if they were written just for you.

Keep Track with Printable Fact Bookmarks

As you immerse yourself in the mesmerizing world of constellations, it’s easy to get lost among the countless stars twinkling above. That’s where our printable fact bookmarks come to your rescue! These nifty tools serve as handy references, helping you keep track of all those constellations you’ve learned about.

Print out a set of fact bookmarks and slip them between pages in your favorite astronomy book or magazine. Each bookmark highlights key information about a specific constellation—its name, prominent stars, and unique characteristics—all neatly organized for quick reference. No more flipping back and forth or furiously scrolling through online articles; with our fact bookmarks, the knowledge you seek is just a page turn away.

Easily Accessible Resources for Cosmic Exploration

We understand that researching constellations can sometimes feel like navigating through a black hole of information. That’s why we’ve curated these printable resources to provide interesting details about different constellations in an easily accessible format. No need to spend hours scouring the internet or sifting through dense articles; we’ve done the legwork for you!

Each printable resource offers a treasure trove of celestial knowledge condensed into bite-sized chunks. Whether you’re a seasoned astronomer or just starting your cosmic journey, these resources cater to all levels of interest and expertise. With clear explanations and captivating visuals, they make learning about constellations an enjoyable experience for everyone.

So, what are you waiting for? Dive into the wonders of the night sky with our printable cards and fact bookmarks. Let the stars guide you as you explore ancient myths, trace intricate patterns across the heavens, and unlock the secrets of our vast solar system.

Remember: The universe is at your fingertips—literally!

DIY Decorative Projects: Solar System Garland and Space Scenes

Add flair to any room or event with a diy solar system garland that brings the wonders of space indoors..

Who says you have to be an astronaut to explore the mysteries of the universe? With a DIY solar system garland, you can bring the wonders of space right into your home. Imagine transforming your living room, bedroom, or even a party venue into a celestial wonderland that will leave everyone in awe. This simple yet captivating project allows you to showcase the beauty and grandeur of our solar system in a unique and artistic way.

To create your own solar system garland, all you need are some basic materials such as construction paper, paints, hot glue, and beading thread. Begin by cutting out circular shapes from different colored construction papers to represent each planet in our solar system. You can find templates online or use household objects like glasses to trace perfect circles. Once you have all the planets cut out, it’s time to unleash your creativity!

Take each planet and paint them using acrylic paints. Research the colors of each planet beforehand for accuracy, or let your imagination run wild with vibrant hues. For example, Jupiter could be painted with swirling bands of orange and white, while Mars could have a rusty red surface. Don’t forget about Earth’s beautiful blue-green tones! Allow the planets to dry completely before moving on to the next step.

Now comes the fun part – assembling your solar system garland! Take a long piece of beading thread and tie one end securely. Start threading each planet onto the thread in their respective order from Mercury all the way to Neptune. You can add small knots between each planet to keep them spaced evenly apart or let them hang closer together for a more whimsical look.

Once all the planets are strung together, find the perfect place to display your masterpiece. Hang it from ceiling hooks in your living room or bedroom to create a stunning focal point. If you’re hosting a space-themed party, the garland can be hung across doorways or draped along walls for an out-of-this-world atmosphere. The possibilities are endless!

Create captivating space scenes using simple materials and unleash your creativity.

If you’re looking for a more immersive way to bring the wonders of space into your home, why not try creating captivating space scenes? This DIY project allows you to transform any room into a cosmic oasis where imagination knows no bounds. With just a few basic materials like construction paper, paints, and hot glue, you can let your artistic side shine while showcasing the beauty of our solar system.

Start by gathering a variety of colored construction papers. Cut out different shapes like stars, moons, rockets, and even astronauts to add depth and dimension to your space scene. Once you have all the elements ready, it’s time to get creative with paints! Use acrylic paint to add details and textures to each piece. For example, you can paint swirling galaxies in the background or give planets a realistic appearance with shades of white and gray.

Next, find the perfect spot in your room to create your space scene. It could be on a blank wall or even on a large canvas if you prefer something more portable. Use hot glue or double-sided tape to secure each element onto the desired surface.

Edible Science Craft: Tasty Solar System Model and Edible Planets

Combine science and culinary arts for a delicious learning experience.

Who says learning can’t be delicious? With this edible solar system model project, you can combine the worlds of science and culinary arts to create a tasty and educational masterpiece. By making edible planets that represent each celestial body in our solar system, you’ll engage in a unique hands-on activity that will satisfy both your curiosity and your taste buds.

Engage with the Planets in a Hands-On Activity

Forget about traditional models made of clay or popsicle sticks – it’s time to get creative with food! This project allows you to explore the characteristics of each planet while using materials like ice, gold, clay, pom balls, and more. Each ingredient represents specific features of the planets, making this craft not only interactive but also informative.

To start off your tasty solar system model, gather the following materials:

  • Ice: Use ice cubes or crushed ice to represent the cold nature of outer space.
  • Gold: Roll small pieces of gold-colored candy or fondant into spheres to mimic the rocky surfaces of some planets.
  • Clay: Mold different colors of edible clay (such as modeling chocolate) into various shapes to match each planet’s appearance.
  • Pom Balls: Choose colorful pom balls or candy-coated chocolates to resemble gas giants like Jupiter and Saturn.
  • Rock Candy: Attach rock candy sticks to represent asteroids or comets floating through space.
  • Hole Puncher: Create holes in some planets using a hole puncher to simulate craters or impact sites.

Once you have gathered all your materials, it’s time to bring your solar system model to life!

Learn About Planetary Characteristics While Satisfying Your Taste Buds

As you construct your edible planets one by one, take the opportunity to learn about their unique characteristics. Here’s a breakdown of the planets in our solar system and some key features you can incorporate into your edible creations:

  • Mercury: The closest planet to the Sun, Mercury is known for its extreme temperatures. Represent this by using ice cubes or crushed ice as the base for your Mercury model.
  • Venus: Often referred to as Earth’s “sister planet,” Venus is covered in thick clouds of sulfuric acid. Use yellow or orange-colored clay to represent these dense clouds on your Venus model.
  • Earth: Our home planet, Earth, is mostly covered in water. Create oceans on your Earth model by using blue-colored icing or edible gel.
  • Mars: Known as the “Red Planet,” Mars has a rusty appearance due to iron oxide on its surface. Roll small pieces of red-colored candy or fondant into spheres and attach them to your Mars model.
  • Jupiter: As the largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter is famous for its colorful bands of gas and swirling storms like the Great Red Spot. Use pom balls or candy-coated chocolates in various shades of brown and orange to mimic these distinctive features.
  • Saturn: Saturn is recognized by its prominent ring system made up of ice particles and rocky debris. Create Saturn’s rings using thin strips of white fondant or edible paper wrapped around your edible creation.
  • Uranus: This icy giant has a unique feature – it rotates on its side!

Calculating Scale Distances and Planet Sizes for Accuracy

Are you ready to take your solar system model project to the next level of realism? One key aspect that can make or break the authenticity of your model is accurately calculating scale distances between planets. By gaining insight into this crucial step, you’ll ensure that your model reflects the vastness of our solar system in a precise and realistic way.

Gain insight into calculating accurate scale distances between planets to ensure realism in your model.

One of the most important factors to consider is the proportional distance between each planet. To achieve accuracy, you need to calculate these scale distances based on the actual distances in our solar system. This means converting astronomical units (AU) into a manageable scale suitable for your model.

To get started, gather information about the average distance from each planet to the Sun in AU. For example, Earth’s average distance is approximately 1 AU. Next, determine an appropriate scale for your model. Let’s say you decide on a 1:100 million scale where 1 centimeter represents 100 million kilometers. To calculate the scaled distance for Earth, divide its actual distance by 100 million and convert it into centimeters.

For instance:

  • Actual distance from Sun to Earth: 149.6 million km
  • Scaled distance: (149.6 million km) / (100 million) = 1.496 cm

Repeat this process for all other planets, ensuring that each scaled distance accurately reflects their respective positions within our solar system. By doing so, you’ll bring a new level of realism and accuracy to your model.

Understand how to determine proportional planet sizes based on scale measurements for an authentic representation.

In addition to calculating scale distances, it’s equally important to consider proportional planet sizes when constructing your solar system model. After all, an accurate representation should reflect not only the relative distances between planets but also their actual sizes.

To determine proportional planet sizes, start by gathering the actual diameters of each planet. For example, Earth has an average diameter of approximately 12,742 kilometers. Similar to calculating scale distances, you’ll need to choose a suitable scale for your model. Let’s continue with the 1:100 million scale we used earlier.

To calculate the scaled diameter for Earth, divide its actual diameter by 100 million and convert it into centimeters:

  • Actual diameter of Earth: 12,742 km
  • Scaled diameter: (12,742 km) / (100 million) = 0.12742 cm

Repeat this process for all other planets in your model, ensuring that each scaled diameter accurately reflects their respective sizes relative to one another.

Learn about the mathematical calculations involved in accurately scaling distances and sizes within a solar system model project.

Creating a realistic solar system model involves more than just eyeballing proportions. It requires some mathematical calculations to ensure accuracy in scaling both distances and sizes. While these calculations may seem daunting at first glance, they are relatively straightforward once you understand the underlying principles.

When determining scaled distances or sizes, you’ll primarily be using ratios and proportions. By establishing a consistent scale ratio for your model (e.g., 1:100 million), you can easily convert actual measurements into scaled representations.

For distance calculations: 1.

Wrapping Up the Solar System Model Project

Congratulations on completing the various sections of the solar system model project! You’ve now got all the tools and inspiration you need to create an engaging and educational project that will surely impress you. From step-by-step instructions to creative ideas like DIY decorative projects and edible science crafts, you have plenty of options to choose from. So go ahead, let your creativity soar, and build a solar system model that will bring the wonders of space right into your home!

Now that you’re equipped with all this knowledge, it’s time to get started on your own solar system model project. Remember, don’t be afraid to experiment and add your own personal touch to make it truly unique. And if you’re feeling stuck or need some guidance along the way, don’t hesitate to refer back to these sections for inspiration.

How long does it take to complete a solar system model project?

The time required for completing a solar system model project can vary depending on factors such as complexity, materials used, and individual pace. On average, it may take anywhere from a few hours to a couple of days.

What materials do I need for a solar system model project?

Common materials for creating a solar system model include styrofoam balls or foam spheres (for planets), paint or markers (for coloring), wire or string (for hanging), glue or adhesive (for attaching planets), and any additional decorative elements you might want to incorporate.

Can I use alternative materials instead of styrofoam balls?

Absolutely! While styrofoam balls are commonly used due to their lightweight nature, you can explore alternative options such as paper mache, clay, or even recycled materials like old tennis balls or ping pong balls.

How can I make my solar system model more accurate?

To make your solar system model more accurate, ensure that the sizes of the planets are in proportion relative to each other, and consider calculating the scale distances between them. You can find resources online that provide the actual sizes and distances of planets in our solar system.

Are there any additional resources I can use to learn about the solar system?

Definitely! In addition to the sections completed in this blog post, you can explore books, documentaries, and websites, and even visit planetariums or science museums to deepen your knowledge about the solar system. Keep exploring and learning!

Remember, have fun with your solar system model project, and enjoy the journey of discovery as you bring the wonders of space into your home!

How to Make Your Own Solar System Model

David Arky / Getty Images

  • Homework Tips
  • Learning Styles & Skills
  • Study Methods
  • Time Management
  • Private School
  • College Admissions
  • College Life
  • Graduate School
  • Business School
  • Distance Learning
  • M.Ed., Education Administration, University of Georgia
  • B.A., History, Armstrong State University

A solar system model is an effective tool that teachers use to teach about our planet and its environment. The solar system is made of the sun (a star), as well as the planets  Mercury , Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto, and the celestial bodies that orbit those planets (like moons). 

You can make a solar system model out of many types of materials. The one thing you should keep in mind is scale; you will need to represent the different planets according to differences in size.

You should also realize that a true scale will probably not be possible when it comes to distance. Especially if you have to carry this model on the school bus.

One of the easiest materials to use for planets is Styrofoam© balls. They are inexpensive, lightweight, and they come in a variety of sizes; however, if you intend to color the planets, be aware that regular spray paint in a can often contain chemicals that will dissolve Styrofoam —so it is best to use water-based paints.

Types of Solar System Models

There are two main types of models: box models and hanging models. You will need a very large (basketball sized) circle or semi-circle to represent the sun. For a box model, you could use a large foam ball, and for a hanging model, you could use an inexpensive toy ball. You will often find inexpensive balls at a "one-dollar" type store.

You can use affordable finger paint or markers to color the planets. A sample range when considering sizes for planets, from large to small, might measure:

  • Jupiter (brownish with a red spot): 4 - 7 inches
  • Saturn (yellow with red ring): 3 - 6 inches
  • Uranus (green): 4 - 5 inches
  • Neptune (blue): 3 - 4 inches
  • Venus (yellow): 2 inches
  • Earth (blue): 2 inches
  • Mars (red): 1.5 inches
  • Mercury (orange): 1 inch

Please note that this is not the right order of arrangement (see the sequence below.)

How to Assemble the Model

To make a hanging model, you can use straws or wooden dowel rods (like for grilling kebabs) to connect the planets to the sun  in the center. You could also use a hula-hoop toy to form the main structure, suspend the sun in the middle (connect it to two sides), and hang the planets around the circle. You can also arrange the planets in a straight line from the sun showing their relative distance (to scale). However, although you may have heard the term "planetary alignment" used by astronomers, they do not mean the planets are all in a straight line, they are simply referring to some of the planets being in the same general region.

To make a box model, cut off the top flaps of the box and set it on its side. Color the inside of the box black, to represent space. You might also sprinkle silver glitter inside for stars. Attach the semicircular sun to one side, and hang the planets in order, from the sun, in the following sequence:

Remember the mnemonic device for this is: M y v ery e ducated m other j ust s erved u s n achos.

  • Journey Through the Solar System: Planets, Moons, Rings and More
  • The New Solar System: Exploration Continues
  • Trojan Asteroids: What Are They?
  • Handy Mnemonic Devices to Help Remember Homework Facts
  • What Is an Acrostic?
  • Mnemonic Devices for Students
  • Tips for Remembering How to Spell Wednesday and Other Tricky Words
  • Journey through the Solar System: Planet Venus
  • Exploring Minor Planets
  • Journey Through the Solar System: Planet Uranus
  • The Pioneer Missions: Explorations of the Solar System
  • Journey Through the Solar System: Planet Neptune
  • How to Make a DNA Model out of Candy
  • Explore Earth - Our Home Planet
  • Journey Through the Solar System: Planet Mercury
  • Solar System Printables

' class=

1. Get to know our solar system

2. form a nebula, 3. add new elements, 4. introduce orbital motion, 5. repeat the process, 6. notice different types of planets, 7. add the energy of our sun, 8. explore more.

Learning Space

Teachable Moments

Stay Connected

twitter icon

Model How the Solar System Formed

In this project, you'll create your own solar system out of playdough to learn how the planets formed.

Photo of the materials for this activity.

3-4 colors of modeling clay OR playdough

Paper OR plastic plate

Get to know our solar system and what makes it so special by visiting NASA's Solar System Exploration website and exploring the interactive below. Consider the diversity of celestial bodies in our solar system beyond the eight planets, such as the moons, asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets. Each has unique characteristics.

This interactive shows a real-time simulated view of the solar system and NASA missions in space. Explore more by clicking and dragging or use the control icons.

Photo of the process described in step 2.

Roughly 4.5 billion years ago, our solar system formed from a nebula made up of interstellar dust and gas.

Start your model by creating this ancient nebula. Use one color of playdough to create 15-20 pea-size balls, and place them on your paper plate. These represent interstellar dust.

+ Expand image

Photo of the process described in step 3.

The interstellar dust that gave rise to our solar system was made up of a wide range of elements from the periodic table.

We'll simulate these different types of dust by adding 15-20 more pieces of playdough in different colors. Try using three to four different colors to best represent the variety of interstellar dust.

The elements of our solar system are not stationary. They are constantly orbiting our Sun at dozens of kilometers per second.

Introduce this movement in your early solar system by using your hand to gently apply pressure to your plate. Now, move your hand clockwise around the "solar system" (plate) three or four times.

What did you observe? Do you have the same number of pieces as before? You may notice that some pieces are now stuck together. This process of the pieces coming together is called accretion. It's what creates planets and other celestial bodies. While accretion happened quickly in our model, the process took place over billions of years in our solar system.

Repeat the process of gently moving your hand over the model solar system another three or four times.

What happened to the pieces of dust over time? Did you have as many pieces collide and form larger planets this time? You may have noticed that you had fewer collisions. This is because your newly formed planets had already picked up all the dust in their orbital path. Now, your model solar system is starting to look more like the solar system we have today.

Photo of the process described in step 6.

Looking at your solar system model, what do you notice about the colors of playdough in each new planet? Are they all the same color? The same amount of each color? Likely you'll notice that each of your planets looks a little different, some having more of each color than others and some being larger or smaller.

Similarly, our solar system is made up of many types of celestial bodies, ranging from small rocky planets like Earth to gas giants like Jupiter.

Thanks to the heat and solar wind from our Sun, elements in our early solar system were not randomly distributed the way they might have been in our first model. Volatile gasses were sent past the asteroid belt to a cooler area of space, while rocky materials were drawn in by the Sun's gravity.

Recreate your solar system model from the beginning with colors arranged by distance from the center. What happens to your planets this time? Are they all made up of similar elements or are the elements mixed together, and where?

Check out these videos and projects to learn more about our solar system:

solar system project materials

Space Place in a Snap: The Solar System's Formation

Find out how our solar system formed and how it came to be the busy place it is today.

Solar System Size and Distance

How big are the planets and how far away are they compared to each other? Find out in this video about the scale of our solar system.

solar system project materials

Make a Scale Solar System

Use beads and string, sidewalk chalk, or your own creative choice of materials to build a scale model of planet sizes or distances in the solar system.

solar system project materials

Solar System Scroll

Students predict the scale of our solar system and the distance between planets, then check their answers using fractions.

  • PRO Courses Guides New Tech Help Pro Expert Videos About wikiHow Pro Upgrade Sign In
  • EDIT Edit this Article
  • EXPLORE Tech Help Pro About Us Random Article Quizzes Request a New Article Community Dashboard This Or That Game Popular Categories Arts and Entertainment Artwork Books Movies Computers and Electronics Computers Phone Skills Technology Hacks Health Men's Health Mental Health Women's Health Relationships Dating Love Relationship Issues Hobbies and Crafts Crafts Drawing Games Education & Communication Communication Skills Personal Development Studying Personal Care and Style Fashion Hair Care Personal Hygiene Youth Personal Care School Stuff Dating All Categories Arts and Entertainment Finance and Business Home and Garden Relationship Quizzes Cars & Other Vehicles Food and Entertaining Personal Care and Style Sports and Fitness Computers and Electronics Health Pets and Animals Travel Education & Communication Hobbies and Crafts Philosophy and Religion Work World Family Life Holidays and Traditions Relationships Youth
  • Browse Articles
  • Learn Something New
  • Quizzes Hot
  • This Or That Game New
  • Train Your Brain
  • Explore More
  • Support wikiHow
  • About wikiHow
  • Log in / Sign up
  • Hobbies and Crafts

How to Make a Solar System Mobile

Last Updated: January 22, 2024 Fact Checked

This article was reviewed by Amy Guerrero . Amy Guerrero is an Arts and Crafts Specialist and the Owner of Sunshine Craft Co., a crafting studio based in Phoenix, Arizona. Amy specializes in macrame, DIY crafting, and teaching fiber arts. She offers monthly in-person and online workshops along with having developed a range of DIY craft kits for at-home projects. Amy holds a BS in Industrial Design from Philadelphia University. She worked as a graphic designer before starting her own business. Sunshine Craft Co. is a creative hub that offers a wide range of workshops, tools, and resources for any craft project to inspire creativity and community engagement. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 1,057,493 times.

Making a solar system mobile is a great activity for when you're learning about the solar system. All you need to build your mobile are some simple supplies and an assortment of craft paints.

Constructing Planets

Step 1 Collect the materials needed to construct the planets.

  • You will need styrofoam balls in the following sizes: 5, 4, 3, 2.5, 2, 1.5, and 1.25 inches. You will need two each of the 1.5 and 1.25 inch balls.
  • You will also need a styrofoam sheet that is .5 inches and 5 x 5 inches. This is what you will use to make Saturn's rings.
  • Get acrylic craft paints in the following colors: Red, orange, yellow, green, blue-green, dark blue, cobalt blue, light blue, white and black. You will paint your planets with these colors.

Step 2 Stick a skewer into each one of the styrofoam balls.

  • Set them aside in the following order: 5 inch, 1.25 inch, 1.5 inch, 1.5 inch, 1.25 inch, 4 inch, 3 inch, 2.5 inch, and 2 inch.
  • Trace the diameter of the 4 inch jar onto the center of the styrofoam sheet with a pencil or pen.
  • Center the 3 inch jar in the 4 inch ring you just traced. Trace around the edge of the 3 inch jar with a pencil or pen.
  • Cut the styrofoam ring out, using an x-acto knife by following along your traced lines.
  • Never let a child use the x-acto or serrated knife. An adult should always do this step.
  • Put out your paints in plastic cups, and fill a cup halfway with water to rinse your paintbrush.
  • Paint the 5 inch ball bright yellow. This will be the sun.
  • Pick up your next ball. It should be 1.25 inches and will represent Mercury. Paint this one orange.
  • Paint the next ball (1.5 inches) blue-green. This will represent Venus.
  • Paint the next ball (1.5 inches) dark blue, and add green continents. This will be Earth.
  • Mars should be painted red. This will be the next 1.25 inch ball.
  • Paint the 4 inch ball with orange with red and white stripes. This will be Jupiter. Add the Great Red Spot on Jupiter in the correct area with red paint.
  • Paint the 3 inch ball yellow and the styrofoam ring orange. This will be Saturn.
  • Get the 2 inch ball and paint it cobalt blue to represent Uranus.
  • Get the 2.5 inch ball and paint it light blue. This will represent Neptune.
  • Paint the dowel rod black.

Step 6 Let the planets and dowel dry.

  • Stick the pointed end of the skewer handles from the planets in a large jar and let the planets dry without touching.
  • Clean up your area a little bit while they dry.
  • You can clean your paintbrush, get rid of your paint cups and water, and scraps from cutting the rings from Saturn.
  • Line the inner rim of the orange painted ring with craft glue.
  • Push the yellow painted 3 inch styrofoam ball into the ring, taking care not to split the styrofoam ring.
  • Set it aside to dry while you construct the rest of the mobile.

Putting Together the Solar System Mobile

Step 1 Cut the string that the planets will hang from.

  • Cut the string for the sun the shortest. Make it about 4 inches.
  • Cut the next string two inches longer so the planet will hang a little bit lower. If you cut the string for the sun at 4 inches you would cut the string for Mercury at 6 inches.
  • As you go along, cut each string 2 inches longer. Neptune should thus hang the lowest of all the planets on the mobile.

Step 2 Attach the string to each planet.

  • Remove the skewer from each planet.
  • Tie a knot at the end of each string.
  • Glue the knotted end of each string into the skewer hole on the planet.
  • Remember to glue the smallest string into the sun and the next longest into Mercury and so on. The longest string goes with Neptune.
  • Let the glue dry.
  • Keep the planets a good distance apart. You don't want them to touch as they hang.
  • Secure the string or yarn on the dowel with a dot of glue.
  • Let this dry.

Step 4 Suspend the mobile.

  • Tie a long piece of string to each end of the dowel rod and secure with glue.
  • Suspend the dowel from the strings, playing with the lengths on either end.
  • Make sure the dowel is suspended horizontally, then tie the two strings attached to the ends of the dowel together tightly.
  • Use the remaining ends of the strings to tie the mobile to a hook in the ceiling.

Researching and Gathering Supplies

Step 1 Find objects to use to suspend the planets.

  • You will need a wooden dowel that is 1/4 inch in diameter and 30 inches long. You will suspend your planets from this using string.
  • Obtain a skein of black yarn or string. This is what you will use to hang your planets from the dowel.
  • Get some thick white craft glue to help secure the planets onto the strings.
  • If you don't have a hook to screw into the ceiling to suspend your mobile, you will need to get one as well.

Step 2 Gather the tools you will need to put the materials together.

  • Get a pair of scissors and a serrated or x-acto knife. You will need the scissors to cut string and the x-acto knife to cut out the rings for Saturn.
  • Warning: never let a child use the x-acto knife. An adult should help with this.
  • Get a jar or cup with a 3 inch diameter, and another with a 4 inch diameter. You will need to use these to trace onto the styrofoam sheet to make Saturn's rings.
  • You will need a teaspoon to help smooth out the styrofoam.

Step 3 Gather other supplies.

  • Get at least 8 wood skewers. These can be the kind you use for kebabs.
  • You will stick these into the styrofoam balls to act as a handle for less messy painting of your planets.
  • Find a couple of plastic cups for water and paint.
  • Obtain a stiff paintbrush for painting the planets.

Step 4 Research the planets.

  • Learn the planet's names and order: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. [7] X Research source
  • Some models may include Pluto as a planet, but scientists have recently classified this celestial body as a Dwarf Planet. [8] X Research source
  • Make sure you have some information on the sun, which is the center of our solar system.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • You might want to paint or color your planets over newspaper to avoid getting your work area too messy. Thanks Helpful 8 Not Helpful 2
  • Be careful when using scissors and the x-acto knife. Thanks Helpful 10 Not Helpful 2
  • You can use water paints to add effects in the planets. Thanks Helpful 9 Not Helpful 2

Tips from our Readers

  • Use styrofoam balls to make your planets since they're lightweight. But don't overdo it on the glue when putting stuff together. Too much glue can get the styrofoam all sticky and keep things from bonding right.
  • You might want to try hanging the sun from a string and stitching instead of connecting it to the dowel rod with the planets. That'll keep the sun centered above the planets that are orbiting it.
  • Be careful with heat around painted styrofoam planets. Using a hairdryer can cause the paint to get bubbles and cracks in it. It's best to just let projects air dry instead.
  • When you go to paint your planets, have pictures of what they really look like out so you can copy the colors and designs. It'll help make your mobile more accurate.
  • Before you start putting everything together, lay out all the stuff you'll need. Having it all right there makes it less frustrating.

solar system project materials

You Might Also Like

Tell Whether the Moon Is Waxing or Waning

  • ↑ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_guUmUERc4w
  • ↑ https://www.lpi.usra.edu/education/space_days/activities/gasGiants/saturnModel.pdf
  • ↑ https://www.education.com/worksheet/article/solar-system-mobile/
  • ↑ https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/

About This Article

Amy Guerrero

1. Stick wooden skewers into the center of 9 styrofoam balls of various sizes. 2. Paint the balls to look like the planets and the sun using craft paint. 3. Take the skewers out of the styrofoam balls once they're dry. 4. Cut 9 pieces of string so each one is 2 inches longer than one before it. 5. Tie a knot at the end of each piece of string. 6. Glue the knots to the skewer holes on the styrofoam balls. 7. Tie the pieces of string to a long rod so the balls are evenly spaced apart. 8. Tie long pieces of string to the ends of the rod and hang the mobile from a hook. Did this summary help you? Yes No

  • Send fan mail to authors

Reader Success Stories

Mary Fatooh

Mary Fatooh

Aug 21, 2016

Did this article help you?

Dilbag Firdausi

Dilbag Firdausi

Oct 25, 2016

Marinette Dupain Cheng

Marinette Dupain Cheng

Mar 19, 2017

Kim Wong

May 3, 2021

Anonymous

Jun 24, 2016

Am I a Narcissist or an Empath Quiz

Featured Articles

Make Chicken Nuggets

Trending Articles

What is Golden Child Syndrome? 7 Signs You Were the Golden Child

Watch Articles

Wrap a Round Gift

  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Do Not Sell or Share My Info
  • Not Selling Info

wikiHow Tech Help Pro:

Develop the tech skills you need for work and life

Science Explorers

Build a Solar System

by Science Explorers | Mar 11, 2020 | Blog | 0 comments

Build a Solar System

If your children come home from school each day brandishing pretend light sabers or planning their next trip to a galaxy far, far away, congratulations. In addition to having kids with great imaginations, you may have future astronauts in the house.

You can encourage an interest in science or appreciation for art projects by doing this solar system project for kids. The activity is designed to foster creativity and get kids asking questions. This fun undertaking can help your children remember the order of the planets and learn their names. By the end of the solar system activity, your child will learn new things and develop a sense of accomplishment at all they can do on their own.

Supplies for Building a Solar System

To assemble your own solar system, you will need:

  • Nine styrofoam balls of varying sizes
  • One pipe cleaner
  • Wooden sticks
  • Black marker
  • Paint and paintbrushes
  • Floral foam block

Sizing and Coloring Your Planets

Choosing a size and coloring your planets will be the first steps in creating the solar system. You may have to help your child with this, depending on their age. The sun should be the biggest ball, and your child will color it yellow. We’ve listed the planets from biggest to smallest along with their suggested colors:

  • Jupiter  : Yellow
  • Saturn  : Brown
  • Uranus  : Light blue
  • Neptune  : Dark blue
  • Earth  : Blue
  • Venus  : Purple
  • Mars  : Red
  • Mercury  : Gray

For older elementary-aged kids, encourage them to research the colors and sizes themselves, which will help them learn more about the solar system. Getting the paint on the balls can be challenging. The easiest method is to roll the balls on a plate filled with paint, but you can also use a paintbrush to cover the balls in paint. Make it a little easier by affixing the foam ball to a small wooden stick.

Once you have painted each ball and it has dried, you can make small touches on them to make them look like the real planets. Encourage your kids to be creative. Put a few lines of white and green on Earth, for instance, or add a large red dot to Jupiter. You can create a ring for Saturn by wrapping it with a pipe cleaner or making a circle out of cardstock. Use a black marker to write the planet’s name when all the paint has dried.

Ordering the Planets

Next, you will arrange the planets in the proper order around the sun. Again, this is something older children can research and figure out themselves. For younger children, you can help them with the order, which goes:

Your child will arrange the planets going out from the sun. The first thing they will do is put each planet on a wooden stick. Then, starting with the sun, then Mercury and so forth until you reach Uranus, put the other end of the wooden stick into the floral foam block. You will have nine balls altogether.

Things to Ask Your Child After Finishing the Solar System Activity

When you have finished assembling the solar system, take some time to look at the project and talk to your child about it. They can draw a lot of scientific conclusions just by looking at the sun, planet sizes and planet placement. Start a discussion using these questions, and encourage them to find answers to any they can’t answer on their own:

  • Based on their location compared to the sun, which planet do you think is the coldest? Which one is the warmest?
  • How many planets are there in the solar system?
  • What do you think the ring around Saturn is made from?
  • What is a moon? Which planet has the most moons?
  • Why isn’t Pluto included in the solar system? What is Pluto?
  • Which planet takes the longest time to orbit around the sun?
  • Which planet takes the shortest time to orbit around the sun?
  • Which planet besides Earth is your favorite and why?

Does your child love learning about space and other science concepts? Consider enrolling them in one of our   after-school science clubs   or a   summer science camp  . Learn more about our offerings and locations where programs are available by   getting in touch  .

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Recent Posts

  • How to Make a Rocket With a Bottle
  • DIY Space-Themed Activities for Kids
  • Science or Magic? Fun Science Magic Tricks for Kids
  • 7 Best Ocean-Themed Educational Toys for Kids
  • 4 Safe and Exciting Chemistry Experiments for Kids

Recent Comments

How to Make a Solar System Model at Home for a School Project

The solar system model is one of the basic things which is taught to students at the beginning level in science. Also, the solar system is the planetary system that exists at the center of our galaxy (Milky Way).

solar system model

                                                                                                                Source: schoolproject

Solar System Model

The solar system refers to the gravitationally bound system that revolves around the sun directly or indirectly. Also, the solar system consists of eight planets. Besides, we refer to these eight revolving bodies as a planet. Furthermore, the name of these planets is Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune.

How to Build a Solar System Model?

Building a solar system model is not a difficult task if you can visualize it. Also, if you know inside your brain the size and position relation of the planets. Besides, building a practical model of the solar system is not possible but we can make a correctly scaled model.

Furthermore, use a different size for reference to the planet and sun. Like the sun would be around an 8- inch ball and earth would be around the size of a peppercorn. In this situation, the entire model would be around a diameter of 2.54 km. So, the question that arises is how it makes it compatible with a science project.

1. Paint the display

Lay a cardboard box in a way that the opening top side faces you. Furthermore, the inside of the box either dark blue or black. In addition, paint some stars and galaxies with white paint or with glow in the dark paint for a more realistic effect.

2. Sort the foam balls

Sort the foam balls in four different sizes. The largest ball should be the sun and the next largest ball should be Jupiter and Saturn, after that Uranus and Neptune, and then Mercury Venus, Earth, and Mars.

3. Paint the planets

Paints the balls using different colors like:

  • Orange or yellow for the sun
  • Brown for mercury
  • Brownish-yellow for Venus, Saturn, and Jupiter
  • Red for Mars
  • And Blue for Earth, Neptune, and Uranus.

4. Cut the Asteroid belt and planetary rings

Out of poster board cut four rings. In addition, keep in mind that they should be big enough to make the planetary rings of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Furthermore, cut another ring that should be large enough to fit in between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter (Asteroid belt).

5. Glue up everything

Firstly, glue the planetary rings with their respective planets (Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune). After that, glue the sun and planets on the tips of straws. Furthermore, draw asteroids on the asteroid belt with markers.

6. Cut strong thread and set it

Cut two strong thread pieces of the length and width of the box opening. Furthermore, punch two holes with scissors in the center of the top of the box. After that, drop each end of the thread from opposite holes so that all ends fall to the same height. Lastly, tie the knot at the ceiling of the display so they do not side around.

7. Put it all together

Glue each piece of the solar system in their respective places. Also, place the sun in the center and from there move outward and place each planet. Moreover, tie the ends of the fishing line to the asteroid belt’s quarter points.

Solved Question on Solar System Model

Question. Which of the following is not a planet?

A. Earth B. Mars C. Pluto D. Saturn

Answer. The correct answer is option C. As Pluto was earlier a planet but some time ago scientists exclude it from the planetary system.

Customize your course in 30 seconds

Which class are you in.

tutor

  • Hubble’s Law
  • Chandrasekhar Limit
  • Life Cycle of Stars
  • Fermi Paradox
  • Constellations
  • How to Find the Radius of the Earth?
  • Life Cycle of a Star
  • What is a Planet?

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Download the App

Google Play

The 21 Best Solar System Project Ideas for Young Learners

If you’re looking for solar system project ideas that are perfect for young students, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll provide a range of projects that will help students learn about our solar system, from making a model of the solar system to learning about the planets and their orbits. With these projects, your students will have a blast learning about space. Let’s get started.

Solar System Activities for Kindergarten

1. sugar cookie solar system.

solar system project materials

By cooking a sugar cookie solar system, you’re able to simultaneously learn about the solar system while spending quality participating in a physical activity. Our solar system is not only home to planets, but also the sun, moons, comets, stars, and much more! This activity allows your young students to better understand how all of these different celestial bodies interact with one another. Learn more .

2. Space sensory bin

solar system project materials

The sensory bin contains glitter, models of the planets, stars and other fun shapes to help incorporate STEM learning with this helpful sensory dactivity. Learn more .

3. Hands on solar system

solar system project materials

All you need to do to play with this solar system is get a large window and a spray bottle of water. This will even work if you’re in the bathtub! Spray the window with water and stick the planets up one by one starting with the sun. As you put them up, talked about planet names pointed out how some were closer or farther away from the sun. You can also discussed similarities and differences between planets; how some have rings around them while others don’t for example. Learn more .

4. Planets and the solar system

solar system project materials

With your young learners, touch, read, and discover all about our amazing solar system with Smithsonian Kids! With special embossing to highlight fun facts about the wonders of space and the universe, this book engages both verbal and tactile learning skills. Embossed textures as well as bright photographs and renderings from Smithsonian are sure to engage, entertain, educate curious students. Learn more .

5. Glow in the dark decals

solar system project materials

Last for very young students is these decals you can get as a parent. They are much bigger and more high quality than you would expect. They look great, are highly detailed, glow in the dark and are perfect for the child that shows interest in space and the solar system. Learn more .

Solar System Activities for Grades Kindergarten – Grade 1-2

6. solar system hat.

solar system project materials

A great activity that helps students practice their motor skills while learning about the solar system. You as the teacher may need to help out with the writing, but the coloring and cutting can be done by the children.

7. Space tray

solar system project materials

The space tray allows endless possibilities for the imagination to run wild. This space-themed tray is great for developing language skills, curiosity about the natural world, numeracy skills, cause and effect awareness, and fine motor skills. Learn more .

8. Clothes pin paint stick solar model

solar system project materials

A great idea is to turn clothes pins into painted sticks that point to the different planets. Students can create both the planet cloth and decorate the pins. The activity can be adjusted for difficulty and you can require students to label the planets as well. Learn more .

9. Solar system made of chalk

solar system project materials

A simply yet brilliant idea is to use chalk outside to create and label the solar system. This solar system science activity requires you and your students to step outside for a fun learning experience. By measuring the sun’s scaled distances from each planet, provided by NASA, your students will get an understanding of how large our solar system really is. Learn more .

10. There’s no place like space

solar system project materials

The last on our list for kindergarten is a book by Tish Rabe. It’s a great activity to help students learn about the solar system as they start to read. Students will learn basic vocabulary and this book can help lead into the activities mentioned previously. Learn more .

11. Lava Lab – Prep book

solar system project materials

An excellent workbook with both content and visuals. Math, tracing letters, finding differences, coloring, cutting pasting, this book has it all and for rising levels of difficulty too. There’s plenty of explanation pages with lots of blank space to practice on. Essential to help your students understand solar concepts you want to teach. Learn more .

12. Solar system balloons

solar system project materials

These balloons are large, detailed and perfect for use in a project with young learners. Consider using these balloon outside during PE class with a parachute to help demonstrate the size and scope of our solar system. Learn more .

Solar System Activities for Grades 3-5

13. solar system foam model.

solar system project materials

Create a foam model of the solar system ( foam ball set here ). Students can engage in this activity through painting, drawing and creating. They will also need to get material to best represent the size of each planet. An overall fun activity students can spend a day or two creating. Learn more .

14. National Geographic Kids Window Art Kit 

solar system project materials

With this captivating craft kit, children can make an beautiful window solar system display. The set includes 8 acrylic planets, 1 paintbrush, 5 glow-in-the-dark paints (red, green, orange, yellow & blue), 2 metallic paints; and kid-friendly instructions & learning guide. A great choice for home school. Learn more .

15. Solar system model making kit

solar system project materials

Children will love learning about the solar system with this 4M Solar System Planetarium set. They can paint and assemble the planets, rods, and string included in the set, then use the stencils and glow paint pen to create their own starscapes.

The wall chart is filled with facts about planetary bodies, orbits, rotations, distances from the sun – everything kids need to know to explore our little corner of space. And when they’re done playing planetarium engineer you can test their knowledge. Learn more .

16. Solar craft projects

solar system project materials

Contains a few simple crafts students will enjoy. Ideal for ages from 4-10. Overall a bit basic and not as in-depth as other options on the list, but if you’re homeschooling your children and want a few, simple but fun activities then consider looking at this offering from Jack in the Box. Learn more .

17. Playdough solar system (3 lbs minimum)

solar system project materials

Use art dough or Playdough to create models of the different planets. Students need to be responsible and creative for this activity to work. In addition you’ll need a lot of art dough to complete this project. You can purchase tubs of different colors of dough for an affordable price. Learn more .

Solar System Activities for Grades 6-8

18. solar system model.

solar system project materials

Upper elementary students will have a blast creating an old-fashioned 3D diorama like the one pictured. Not only are these projects fun for kids, but they’re also great learning tools. Students can research facts about planets and then use that information to create their own solar system model. This is a great way for them to show off everything they’ve learned throughout your solar system unit. Learn more.

19. Solar system online model

solar system project materials

SolarSystemScope.com provides an excellent virtual model of the solar system. You can download it to your desktop or mobile device. It provides an up-to-date model of the Solar System, night sky and outer space. Students can learn interesting facts about each object while viewing their accurate positions in real time. Learn more .

20. Planetary Exploration by Google Earth and Mirakan

solar system project materials

This is a walkthrough tutorial and educational program of exploring the planets provided by a partnership of Google Earth and Miraikan, the national museum of emerging science and engineering. Ideal lesson and project introduction for any computer class. Learn more .

21. Planet project

solar system project materials

A classic option for older students is to create a dedicated project about a single aspect of our solar system in greater detail with graphics, facts, research as well as artistic effort and design.

Solar system projects ideas – conclusion

You now have a few ideas for your solar system project. You can create a scale model of the solar system, or use different materials to represent each planet. The sky is the limit when it comes to creativity. No matter which project you choose, you’ll have a blast learning more about our amazing solar system.

solar system project materials

Editorial Staff

Keep reading.

What Makes a Good Online Teacher: 8 Essential Qualities

What Makes a Good Online Teacher: 8 Essential Qualities

Online teaching requires a few different skills and technical abilities you'll need to cultivate in order to be successful.

Is Teaching English abroad a Waste of Time?

Is Teaching English abroad a Waste of Time?

Is teaching English abroad a waste of time as a young professional? Come learn what the pros and cons are of the ESL industry.

12 Reasons Why Teachers Should Use an iPad as a Notebook

12 Reasons Why Teachers Should Use an iPad as a Notebook

We love using iPads as a digital notebook instead of using pen and paper. Come find out our top reasons why you should switch.

illustrated Tea Cup

30 Unique Solar System Project Ideas and Activities for Kids

Solar System Project Ideas for Kids that are Out of this World

Are your kids fascinated by planets and the solar system? Engaging them in solar system projects is enjoyable and a great educational opportunity. Through these projects, children can explore and understand information about the solar system in a hands-on way, going beyond what they learn from books alone.

Whether it’s a school science project or a fun activity at home, these solar system project ideas are perfect for igniting their curiosity and creativity. So, why not embark on this cosmic journey together and make learning about the solar system an exciting adventure for your little astronomers?

Engaging children in solar system projects fosters their creativity and instills a love for science and space exploration.

In this blog, let’s explore 30 solar system project ideas and activities that are both fun and educational, allowing kids to embark on a journey to discover the wonders of the cosmos.

1. Edible Solar System Project

Edible Solar System Project

Combine learning and fun by making an edible solar system model. Creating an edible solar system model is a fantastic way to combine learning and fun in an interactive and delicious activity. Gather an assortment of colorful fruits and candies to represent each planet in our solar system. Combine learning and fun by making an edible solar system model. Use fruits and candies to represent the planets, and arrange them in their correct order from the Sun. It’s a tasty way to learn about the solar system. You can even bake solar system theme cookies to represent each planet. You could even bake moon and star-shaped cookies for added fun.

2. Create a 3D Solar System Model

Create a 3D Solar System Model

Let’s begin the solar system journey with a hands-on approach by having kids craft their very own 3D model of the solar system. Using readily available craft materials like Styrofoam balls, paint, and strings, children can create a visually accurate representation of each planet. This engaging project allows them to grasp the concept of the planets’ relative sizes and distances within our solar system. This is an amazing thought for a group activity as the kids will learn team bonding along with working collaboratively with peers. Take your science projects to new heights with this interesting 3D project idea.

3. Designing a Spacecraft

Designing a Spacecraft

Inspire your little space explorers to let their imagination soar as they design their very own spacecraft for their solar system project. Whether they prefer drawing, painting, or using recyclable materials to build a model, the possibilities are endless. This exciting project empowers kids to unleash their creativity. Through this activity, they’ll not only have fun but also learn about the importance of innovation and imagination in the world of space exploration. So, buckle up and get ready to embark on an imaginative journey through the cosmos!

4. Planets with Playdough

Planets with Playdough

Making planets from playdough is an engaging and educational activity that brings the wonders of the cosmos to life. Kids can mold and shape colorful playdough into different planets, moons, and even the Sun, allowing them to create their mini solar system. As they create each celestial body, they can learn about their unique characteristics, such as size, color, and surface features. The hands-on experience of crafting the planets provides the kids with a deeper understanding of our solar system and its components. It’s a fun and interactive way for children to explore the mysteries of space.

5. Make a Planet Mobile

Make a Planet Mobile

Create a mesmerizing planet mobile with colored paper or foam balls, hanging the planets in the right order from the Sun to recreate the solar system. As they carefully arrange each planet, they gain a deeper understanding of the planet’s position in our cosmic neighborhood. This project teaches kids about the order of planets and serves as a lovely room decoration. It’s a fun and educational way to bring the wonders of the universe into their living space! With each gentle sway of the planets in the craft, they’ll be reminded of the wonders of the solar system they have created through this project.

6. Solar System Puzzle

Solar System Puzzle

Transform the solar system into an exciting puzzle by using a poster or drawing as the base. Secure it on sturdy cardboard and carefully cut it into multiple pieces. As kids piece together the puzzle, they’ll embark on a thrilling journey to memorize the names and order of the planets. This engaging activity enhances their creative skills and reinforces their knowledge of the cosmic bodies of our solar system. Get ready for an educational adventure that will leave young minds inspired by the mysteries of space. This activity will make learning about the cosmos a fun experience for the little wonders.

7. Making Solar System Posters

Making Solar System Posters

Creating solar system posters for projects is an exciting and easy activity that kids will love! They can use colorful markers, crayons, and stickers to draw and decorate each planet. Starting with the Sun at the center, they can arrange the planets in the correct order, showcasing their sizes and unique features. Ask them to add fun facts and information about each planet to make the poster both educational and eye-catching. With this creative project, kids can explore the wonders of the cosmos while having a blast expressing their artistic skills. Hang the finished posters on display, and let their curiosity about the solar system shine bright! They will be able to remember the names of the planets even more easily with this project.

8. Solar System with Fruits

Solar System with Fruits

Discover a delightful science snack idea that serves as an intuitive and interactive way to model celestial bodies using fruits. By encouraging students to incorporate food into their learning, we can positively influence their conversations during snacks and meals. Invite them to create their unique solar system models using colorful fruits, to spark their curiosity and engagement in science. This hands-on activity will satisfy their taste buds and enhance their understanding of the planets and their arrangement in the solar system. Let them embark on this fruity journey and watch as they explore the cosmos in a delicious way!

9. Solar System with Water Colors

Solar System with Water Colors

Get ready for an easy and exciting project using watercolors to explore the wonders of the solar system. All you need are watercolor paints, brushes, and a sheet of watercolor paper. Begin by sketching the Sun and the planets, each in their unique size and position. Let your imagination take over as you add vibrant colors to each celestial body. Feel free to experiment and create your own cosmic masterpiece! This project is fun and creative and a great way to help the kids learn about the planets and their arrangement in our solar system. This artwork can be displayed in the art classrooms to showcase the little ones’ artsy skills.

10. Marshmallow Constellations

Marshmallow Constellations

Get ready for a sweet and easy solar system project with marshmallow constellations! All you need are marshmallows and toothpicks or wooden skewers. Start by researching different constellations and their patterns in the night sky. Then, using the marshmallows as stars and toothpicks as connectors, recreate the constellations on a flat surface. These marshmallows can be decorated with paint and glitter. It’s a fun and hands-on way to learn about the stars and their arrangements while indulging in some marshmallow fun. So, let your creativity shine as you build your delicious marshmallow constellations and embark on a cosmic journey right at your fingertips.

11. DIY Solar System Jewelry

DIY Solar System Jewelry

Making solar system-themed jewelry is a wonderful and fun project for kids to embark on a cosmic crafting adventure. With simple materials like colorful beads, strings, and some imagination, children can create their own personalized solar system necklaces or bracelets. They can pick beads that represent each planet, arrange them in the right order from the Sun, and string them together to create a wearable masterpiece. This activity not only sparks their creativity but also provides an opportunity to learn about the planets and their order in a playful way. They can also add some moon, star, and planet charms to these jewelry pieces.

12. Constellation Chart with Glittery Stars

Constellation Chart with Glittery Stars

Get ready to embark on a sparkling cosmic journey with this project. This enchanting activity allows children to create their own constellation chart using a dark poster board or paper as the night sky backdrop. They can draw or stick star stickers to represent different constellations, connecting the dots to form the shapes of mythical creatures and other familiar patterns. To add a touch of magic, sprinkle glitter on the stars to make them twinkle just like real stars in the night sky. This project will be a mesmerizing experience for young astronomers. It will provide them with the inspiration to learn about constellations in a fun and exciting way.

13. LEGO Solar System Projects

LEGO Solar System Projects

This easy and engaging activity allows children to build their very own cosmic adventure using LEGO bricks. They can create each planet, the Sun, and even the moon with colorful bricks, arranging them in the correct order from the Sun. Whether they construct a mini solar system model or design a space mission to explore the planets, the possibilities are endless.

14. Solar System Artwork

Solar System Artwork

This easy and enjoyable activity lets kids explore their creativity as they draw or paint the mesmerizing planets, moons, and stars that make up our cosmic neighborhood. From the blazing Sun to the mysterious planets, children can use their imagination to bring the wonders of the solar system to life on paper. This hands-on project allows them to express themselves artistically and fosters a deeper appreciation for the beauty of the universe. So grab your art supplies, and let your little artists embark on a colorful journey through the cosmos.

15. Painting Planters

Painting Planters

With some paint, brushes, and plain planters, the kids can unleash their creativity to transform each one into a unique representation of a planet in our solar system. From the blazing orange of Mars to the deep blue of Neptune, they can explore the colors and features of each planet through painting. Once the planters are decorated, they can arrange them in the correct order from the Sun to replicate the solar system. This fun and educational activity sparks their imagination and introduces them to the wonders of the universe in a hands-on way. As they proudly display their solar system-themed planters, it’s sure to bring a sense of cosmic wonder to their gardening experience!

16. Solar System – Themed Stone Art

Solar System - Themed Stone Art

Grab some smooth stones, paint, and brushes, and let your little ones explore their creativity. Each stone can represent a different planet in our solar system, allowing them to use various colors and patterns to mimic the planet’s appearance. From the red hues of Mars to the swirling blues of Neptune, the possibilities are endless! As they paint each stone, they’ll learn about the planets’ unique features and their positions in the solar system. Once the painting is complete, they can proudly display their cosmic masterpieces in the garden or on a shelf. It’s a fun and educational way to combine art and science.

17. Galaxy Snow Globe

Galaxy Snow Globe

This easy and enchanting activity will require a clear plastic or glass jar with a lid, water, glitter, and a dash of imagination. Start by filling the jar with water, leaving some space at the top. Add glitter to represent the stars shimmering in the galaxy. You can even include small star-shaped sequins for an extra magical touch. Securely seal the lid and give it a gentle shake to watch the stars sparkle like the night sky. This hands-on project not only captivates young minds but also introduces them to the wonders of the galaxy. This masterpiece will be a delightful keepsake, transporting them to the far reaches of space whenever they give it a shake. Happy galaxy crafting!

18. Solar System Bottle Caps

Solar System Bottle Caps

Gather some clean bottle caps, paint, and a black marker to create your cosmic collection. Start by painting each bottle cap with colors representing the planets in our solar system. For instance, use orange for Mars, blue for Earth, and yellow for Saturn. Then, use the black marker to add details like stars and patterns. Once all the bottle caps are decorated, you can arrange them in the correct order from the Sun. They can use their solar system bottle caps as fun and educational game pieces.

19. Popsicle Stick Project

Popsicle Stick Project

This easy and fun activity requires some popsicle sticks, paint, glue, and imagination. Start by painting each popsicle stick with colors representing the planets in our solar system. For example, use orange for Mars, blue for Earth, and red for Jupiter. Let the paint dry completely before moving on to the next step. Once the sticks are dry, arrange them in the correct order from the Sun to replicate the solar system. You can use glue to attach them side by side, creating a mini solar system model. This project encourages creativity and helps kids learn about the planets. It’s a delightful and educational project that will leave your little astronomers starstruck!

20. Planetary Storytime

Planetary Storytime

Gather the young space enthusiasts and pick a cozy spot to read together. You can choose from a selection of children’s books that transport them to distant planets, magical moons, and adventurous journeys among the stars. Each story will introduce them to the planets, their unique characteristics, and even encounters with friendly aliens. This easy and enjoyable activity nurtures a love for reading and sparks their curiosity about the cosmos. Whether it’s a bedtime ritual or a daytime escape, this is a delightful way to ignite their imaginations. This can also be a fun activity for elementary school students.

21. Astronomy Movie Night

Astronomy Movie Night

Get ready for a fantastic astronomy-themed movie night that will take the kids on an incredible journey through space! Organize a fun movie night where you can watch exciting films or documentaries about space exploration, the solar system, and iconic space missions like the moon landing. Gather your friends and family, grab some popcorn, and settle in for an entertaining and educational evening under the stars. The kids will be captivated by the wonders of the universe and inspired to learn more about the cosmos. It’s a stellar way to enjoy quality time together while exploring the mysteries of space right from the comfort of your home!

22. DIY Planetarium

DIY Planetarium

Let’s create a mini planetarium adventure for kids using simple materials! Grab a large cardboard box, a flashlight, and some star stickers. Lay the box on its side and place the flashlight inside, facing upwards. Stick the star stickers on the inner sides of the box to mimic the night sky. Now, kids can lie inside the box and gaze up at the magical “night sky” filled with twinkling stars. They’ll have a blast learning about different constellations and exploring the wonders of the cosmos in this fun and educational activity. So, let the cosmic journey begin as they embark on a stargazing experience right from the comfort of their own homemade planetarium!

23. Space-Themed Party

Space-Themed Party

Host an amazing event where kids can show off their moves to music inspired by the cosmos. Transform the party space with cosmic decorations like stars, planets, and colorful lights. As the music plays, they can dance under the twinkling lights and feel like they’re dancing among the stars. To add to the fun, include space-related games and activities that will keep them entertained and engaged. The possibilities are endless, from a rocket ship dance-off to a moonwalk challenge. This easy and enjoyable party will leave the little astronauts with unforgettable memories of a fun-filled learning experience.

24. Astronomy Field Trip

Astronomy Field Trip

Take a trip to a nearby planetarium, science center, or observatory for an exciting real-life adventure all about space and the solar system! Let kids explore the wonders of the cosmos through interactive space exhibitions, fascinating shows, and even stargazing sessions. They’ll have the chance to see real astronomical objects, learn from experts, and get hands-on with space-themed activities. It’s an easy and educational way to spark their curiosity about the universe and inspire a love for space exploration. This activity is an amazing idea for school project trips. Parents can individually take the kids along with their peers too.

25. Balloons to Resemble Planets

Balloons to Resemble Planets

Get ready for an out-of-this-world kids’ project by making planets with balloons! This fun and interactive activity will ignite their creativity and curiosity about the solar system. To get started, inflate different-sized balloons to represent the planets. Use paint, markers, or stickers to add details like colors, rings, and features that match each planet’s appearance. For example, use red for Mars, blue for Earth, and yellow for Saturn’s rings. As they create their mini planets, they’ll learn about the unique characteristics of each celestial body. You can even hang the finished balloons in their room, creating a cosmic display that showcases their amazing work.

26. Solar System Embroidery Rings

Solar System Embroidery Rings

Start by gathering embroidery hoops and fabric and selecting colors that resemble the planets. Kids can use embroidery floss to stitch the planets onto the fabric, adding intricate details like rings and stars. They can also label each planet with its name for an educational touch. As they bring the solar system to life with their stitching, they’ll enhance their artistic abilities and learn about the planets and their unique features. Once the embroidery is complete, they can proudly display their solar system artwork in the embroidery hoops, adding a touch of celestial beauty to any space. Using the punch needle technique is ideal for this activity.

27. Solar System Bingo

Solar System Bingo

Create Bingo cards featuring various celestial objects like planets, moons, stars, and spacecraft. Kids can learn about the solar system while playing this exciting game. Use small planet-themed tokens as markers, or let the children draw and color their own unique markers. The game caller can call out facts about the solar system, and the players can mark off the corresponding objects on their cards. The first one to get Bingo wins! This interactive and engaging project fosters learning about the cosmos and enhances their listening and observation skills.

28. A Planet-Themed Garland

A Planet-Themed Garland

Gather colorful construction paper or cardstock, scissors, and some string or ribbon. Start by cutting out planet shapes in different sizes and colors. You can use templates or let the kids get creative with their own designs. Once all the planets are ready, punch a hole near the top of each shape. Thread the string or ribbon through the holes, creating a beautiful garland with the planets in their correct order from the Sun. Hang the garland in their room or across a wall to bring the wonders of the solar system to life. This hands-on activity enhances their crafting skills and allows them to learn about the planets.

29. Moon Phases Using Oreo Biscuits

Moon Phases Using Oreo Biscuits

Start by placing the Oreo biscuits on a plate and, using a butter knife, carefully scrape off the cream filling to represent the various phases of the moon. For the full moon, leave the Oreo intact. For the crescent and gibbous phases, scrape off a portion of the cream, and for the new moon, remove all the cream. Arrange the Oreo biscuits in their correct order to mimic the moon’s monthly cycle. This fun and interactive activity satisfies their taste buds and helps them grasp the concept of the moon phases in a hands-on way.

30. Glow in the Dark Stickers

Glow in the Dark Stickers

This exciting activity will transport young explorers to the wonders of the solar system. All you need are some glow-in-the-dark stickers shaped like planets and a dark room for the fun to begin. Place the stickers on a wall or the ceiling, creating your own mini cosmic display. As the lights go out, watch in awe as the planets glow and shine like real celestial bodies in the night sky. This activity sparks their imagination and provides an excellent opportunity to learn about the planets and their arrangement in the solar system. It’s a fun and educational way to bring the magic of the universe right into your home!

Summing It Up

Thus, fun and engaging activities are a crucial component in helping kids learn about the solar system. These enjoyable projects capture their interest and make learning a memorable and exciting experience. By incorporating games, crafts, and interactive tasks, children become active participants in their learning journey. These activities spark their curiosity and imagination, motivating them to explore and discover more about the planets, moons, and stars.

Moreover, fun activities create a positive and supportive learning environment, fostering a love for science and astronomy at an early age. As they have fun while learning, kids are more likely to retain information and develop a deeper understanding of the solar system’s wonders.

So, let the fun activities begin as you seek inspiration from these amazing ideas in this blog post.

Jonathan Green, M.Ed.

Jonathan Green is an esteemed Education Specialist with an impressive track record. He holds a Master's degree in Education alongside bearing expertise in Child Psychology. He began his career as a special education teacher, gaining insights into diverse learning needs. His previous experience includes leading teacher training programs and authoring several papers on early childhood education. His extensive experience is reflected in his insightful articles and webinars. Outside of his professional life, Jonathan is an enthusiastic gardener and a volunteer at local community education centers.

Lively Lesson Plan Examples For Every Grade Level

30 Enriching Lesson Plan Examples for Every Grade Level

solar system project materials

45 Inspiring Haiku Examples for Middle School Writers

Related posts.

How Haiku Poets Find Inspiration in Nature?

How Haiku Poets Find Inspiration in Nature?

Discovering the Science of Baking with Kids

Discovering the Science of Baking with Kids

A vibrant red color against a dark background, instantly capturing attention and drawing the eye towards it

What Colors Grab People’s Attention the Most?

How Can Verb-Based Exercises Help Children with Speech Delays

How Can Verb-Based Exercises Help Children with Speech Delays?

solar system project materials

How Can Children’s Literature Enhance Language Skills and Literacy?

White cubes spell out the word "verbs" - a visual representation of the concept of verbs.

Finding the Verb in a Sentence – Neither Easy, Nor Hard Anymore!

Write a comment cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Child Development
  • DIY Crafts & Projects
  • Learning Games
  • Indoor & Outdoor Activities
  • Party Games
  • Party Ideas
  • Book Recommendations
  • Educational Insights
  • Art & Painting
  • Sensory & STEM Activities
  • Skip to primary navigation
  • Skip to main content
  • Skip to primary sidebar

DIY Crafts logo

  • Crochet Patterns
  • Sewing Patterns
  • DIY Projects
  • Pallet Projects
  • Home & Garden
  • Home Organization
  • Kids Crafts
  • Fashion & Beauty
  • DIY Cat Projects
  • DIY Dog Projects
  • DIY Wedding Projects
  • Jewelry Making Ideas
  • Inspiration
  • Parenting Tips

15 Solar System Project for Kids: DIY Solar System Crafts

Looking for an easy solar system project for kids? Try one of these 15 DIY solar system crafts! These solar system crafts are perfect for preschoolers, kindergarteners, 3rd grade to 6th grade and older kids. They’re a great way to learn about the solar system while having fun!

The solar system is the first thing to study and learn about space. God has created a gorgeous solar system pattern with colorful planets revolving around the bright yellow sun. With these 15 easy solar system projects for kids, you can create this space beauty in an excitingly artistic way. These easy solar system crafts show how easy and fun it is to create these mini versions of the DIY solar system project at home in a variety of fun ways.

To make a solar system mobile project for kids, you’ll need some cardstock, craft paint, and a few other materials. Print out the solar system templates and cut out the planets. Paint the planets however you like. Attach them to cardboard circles with string or fishing line. Hang the mobile from the ceiling or a light fixture.

15 Solar System Project for Kids: DIY Solar System Crafts

Make your own solar system model with clay or play dough. Roll balls of clay or play dough to represent each planet. Use toothpicks or skewers to attach the planets to each other in order. You can also add moons by rolling small balls of clay or play dough and attaching them to the planets with toothpicks or skewers.

Solar System Project for Kids

With these easy solar system projects for kids, your child can explore the solar system while having fun crafting! It’s really super easy to make your own solar system arts and crafts using some simple supplies. This is a great science project for kids of all ages and can be adapted to fit any level of interest or expertise. Not only these solar system science projects, but you can also make some exciting creations with the theme of the solar system too. The solar system mobiles, necklaces, and bracelets are truly creative and quirky crafts in this regard. So get ready to learn about the solar system, have fun crafting, and let the learning (and fun!) begin!

1. DIY Solar System Project – Space Project for Kids

Solar System – Space Project for Kids

If your kids love science then this solar system space project is going to be a weekend hit for them. The lovely planets are made by painting up the Styrofoam balls and hung on an embroidery hook. It would make a great display at their school science exhibition and after that in the bedroom too. todayscreative

2. Easy DIY Kids Solar System Craft

Easy DIY Solar System Craft for Kids

Kids love to paint and if their favorite subject is science then this easy DIY solar system craft is sure fun for them. They can use construction paper and some paint colors to create this lovely solar system on their own. It would look great in their class as well as study room walls. thecraftingchicks

3. DIY Solar System Snowglobe

DIY Solar System Snowglobe

Handmade snow globes are really a trend these days and it can be as exciting as your imagination. This DIY solar system snow globe is apt to display in your kid’s room and enhance their interest in science and space in particular. Grab a mason jar and the clay to make this pretty science project at home. redtedart

4. Make Plastic Lid Solar System

Make Plastic Lid Solar System

The solar system has round and colorful planets and if kids are reading about it in their science book then you should do a project. This plastic lid solar system would so much easy, fun and cheap to do and let kids learn in a joyful way about the solar system. Details here stillplayingschool

5. DIY Solar System with Button Planets

DIY Solar System with Button Planets

Crafting is so much fun and if it’s about science and space then it is full of learning too. The icing on the cake is that you can do this so damn cheaply too. Here is the example of this DIY solar system m made out of a needlework circle and the paint buttons as the planets. deceptivelye

6. Solar System Craft for Kids

Solar System Craft for Kids

If your kid is having trouble learning the order and names of the planets then getting their hands on this solar system craft would be helpful. The whole solar system is made out of the paper and the planets are first created on templates and then cut out and colored. More details here thecraftingchicks

7. DIY Lego Solar System Science for Kids

DIY Lego Solar System Science for Kids

Kids love to play with the lego and now you can add some learning to their playing hours with this lego solar system idea. Kids can choose the lego of certain colors to create the whole solar system like yellow for the sun and red for the mars. Complete details here kitchencounter

8. Make Solar System Necklace for Kids

Make Solar System Necklace for Kids

Take your handmade jewelry game to a whole new level with this solar system necklace craft. Using the wooden beads and acrylic paint the mini planet beads have been created to look utter unique and funky as a neckpiece. Your space girls are going to love this necklace so make it with them. rockitmama

9. Easy to Make Solar System Bracelet

Easy to Make Solar System Bracelet

Beads are available in all the sizes and the colors so this time you can choose them according to the size and colors of sun and planets. Making this solar system bracelet is a great gift idea for the kids to make and give away to their friends. Even the adults can rock this lovely and unique bracelet too. happyhourpro

10. Colorful DIY Solar System Mobile

Colorful DIY Solar System Mobile

Here is a project that would be exciting and fun for your little baby and bit grown-up kids too. This colorful DIY solar system mobile would accomplish a baby’s nursery room and also let the big ones to learn about the planets too. You need colorful cardstock and cutting supplies to make this pretty mobile. marthastewart

11. DIY Light-up Model Solar System Craft

DIY Light up Model Solar System Craft

Whenever kids are studying the solar system they get a project of making it a science project. So you can help your kids making this DIY light-up model solar system craft with feasible supplies like the Styrofoam balls and the paint. The kids would love making it and showing it off to the whole class. someonesmum

12. Handmade Solar System Scratch Art

Easy DIY Solar System Scratch Art

Let your kids explore the space in a fun crafty way with this easy DIY solar system scratch art project. The space items are from the scratch space kit and the rest of the system is made out of the cardboard box. Details here the gingerbread

13. Paper Mache Solar System

Paper Mache Solar System

Kids love to play with the mess of paper, paint and the balloons and this paper mache solar system includes this all. The balloons are covered with the newspaper cutting and paper mache paste and then painted with the colors of sun and planets. Complete details here redtedart

14. Pretty DIY Star Wars Planet Mobile

Pretty DIY Star Wars Planet Mobile

Boys are in love with the star wars and that is why they want a space-themed room too. Enhance the charm of their space room you can get your hands on this lovely star wars planter mobile. Make this mobile from a bought solar system kit, foam pouncers, and the paint. madincrafts

15. How to Make a Solar System Necklace

How to Make a Solar System Necklace

Girls love necklaces and they are going to hugely adore this quite funky and cool solar system necklace. Every planet has its unique color and size so you can take the simple beads and paint them up accordingly. Lastly, string up the planet beads and your pretty space inspired necklace is ready to rock. lilblueboo

Related DIY Crafts for Kids:

Looking for some fun DIY crafts for kids? Look no further! Our collection of fun and creative crafts for kids will keep the little ones entertained for hours on end.

Mason Jar Crafts for Kids

Looking for a fun and easy way to keep the kids entertained? Check out these DIY Mason Jar Crafts for Kids ! With a variety of options to choose from, there’s something for everyone!

Summer Camp Crafts for Kids

Summertime means fun in the sun! These easy summer camp crafts for kids are perfect for keeping the little ones entertained. From colorful mobiles to sweet s’mores, there’s something for everyone. So grab some crafting supplies and get ready to have some fun!

DIY Fidget Toys for Kids

Making your own fidget toys is a fun, easy, and affordable way to keep kids entertained. Plus, it can help improve focus and concentration. Here are simple DIY fidget toys for kids to get you started.

Cardboard Houses for Kids

Looking for unique cardboard house ideas? Check out these fun and easy tutorials for making houses out of cardboard boxes ! Kids will love getting creative and building their own homes.

Sleepover Ideas for Kids

Sleepovers can be a lot of fun, but coming up with ideas for what to do can be tough. Here are some unique sleepover ideas that will keep your kids entertained all night long.

DIY Play Kichen

If you’re looking for a way to add a little more fun to your child’s playtime, consider building them their own kitchen! Find these diy play kitchen ideas for how to do this, and it’s a great way to encourage pretend play. Plus, your child will love having their very own space to cook up imaginary meals.

Make Sensory Bags for Kids

Sensory bags are a great way to encourage exploration and help kids develop their fine motor skills. Here are easy to make sensory bags for kids . with just a few simple supplies, you can create different sensory bags that will keep your little one engaged for hours.

Fruit Crafts for Kids

Looking for fun ways to get your kids interested in fruits? Check out these awesome fruit crafts for kids ! They’re perfect for preschoolers and toddlers and are a great way to teach them about the different types of fruit.

DIY Sandbox Ideas for Kids

Find these easy to build sandbox ideas for kids of all ages! From simple boxes to elaborate designs, there’s sure to be an idea here that will fit your needs and budget.

Conclusion:

If you’re looking for a fun and educational project with your kids, look no further than these 15 DIY solar system crafts. These solar system projects for kids will help teach your children about the different planets in our solar system and how they move through space. Plus, crafting is always fun, so the whole family can get involved. So what are you waiting for? Get started on these amazing solar system projects today!

Related DIY Ideas to Try:

DIY Pokemon Crafts Your Kids Will Love

  • Celestial Bodies
  • Solar System
  • Solar System Project For School

Solar System Project for School

Earth is the place we live and is the place where life can sustain. The earth belongs to this wide universe. The universe holds all the astronomical objects or celestial objects. The solar system includes celestial objects that are gravitationally bound and revolve around the Sun.

The solar system includes the Sun in the middle, which is the nearest star to the earth. Sun is a star. It includes eight planets which are arranged as Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Each planet has its own properties and characteristics. The solar system contains the Sun and planets along with asteroids, satellites and orbits. It is elementary to know about these planets and the Sun, which constitute the solar system.

We all know making a solar system is part of a science project as per the school curriculum. In this article, let us know in detail about designing and developing a solar system project for school.

This article will explain the construction of the solar system in five simple steps.

Solar System Project

Before you begin constructing this project, make sure you know the order of the planets in the solar system. It is mandatory to know the order of the planets in order to know which planet to be placed aside from each planet. It is also important to know the size and colour of each planet too.

Read More: Solar System

Colour Of The Planets

Mercury – Grey

Venus – Grey and Brown

Earth – White, Brown, Green, and Blue

Mars – Red, tan and brown

Jupiter – Orange, White cloud stripes, Brown and Tan

Saturn – Blue-grey, Golden and brown

Uranus – Blue-green

Neptune – Blue

Size of the Sun and Planets in Decreasing Order

Note : The Sun is the largest celestial body among these.

Now let’s begin to construct the solar system, and let us also learn about the step-by-step procedure to construct it.

Materials Required

  • Cardboard sheet of standard length or as per your choice of the area.
  • Paint colours – black and as per the colour of the planets mentioned above.
  • Foam balls in four different sizes, as per the size approximation according to the sizes mentioned above.
  • Make a ring for Saturn using the cardboard sheet. The ring should fit in the foam ball (Saturn planet size).

Steps and Procedures

Step 1: Paint the cardboard with black paint and let it rest for a while. Make sure it is painted evenly. Also, paint the foam balls keeping in mind the size and colour of the planet.

Step 2: Keeping the Sun in the centre of the cardboard sheet, draw the orbits around the Sun to place other planets. Paint the lines of orbit in white colour. Make sure to give a large gap between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter for the asteroid belt.

Step 3: Insert the ring for the Saturn planet and place the painted foam balls (planets) as shown in the picture below.

Solar System Project for School Image 1

Step 4: Stick all the planets, including the Sun, on the cardboard sheet.

Step 5: Between Mars and Jupiter planets, cut small pieces of white paper and stick them randomly to represent the asteroid belt.

The Solar System Project for School is done!!

Read more about the difference between an asteroid and comet .

Frequently Asked Questions on Solar System

1. what are asteroids.

Asteroids are the small irregularly shaped objects that orbits around the sun. They are composed of metal, carbon and rocks.

2. What keeps objects like the planets and the asteroids orbiting around the sun?

Sun’s gravitational pull.

3. Which is the biggest object in the solar system?

The sun is the biggest object in the solar system.

4. How many planets are there in the solar system?

5. is the sun a star, watch the video to learn exciting facts about the sun.

solar system project materials

Stay tuned with BYJU’S for more such interesting experiments on physics, chemistry and biology in an engaging way with video explanations.

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Your Mobile number and Email id will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Request OTP on Voice Call

Post My Comment

solar system project materials

  • Share Share

Register with BYJU'S & Download Free PDFs

Register with byju's & watch live videos.

close

NASA Logo

Meet the Creators, Part 4: Two New 2024 Total Eclipse Posters

Total solar eclipses reveal the Sun’s outer atmosphere – the corona – a white, wispy halo of solar material that flows out from around the Sun. This atmosphere is breathtaking as it glows in the sky for viewers on Earth, surrounding the dark disk of the Moon. In addition to revealing this normally hidden part of our Sun, the eclipse also darkens the sky, changes shadows, and cools the air. It can feel like living inside a piece of art.

Artists have captured the magical appearance of eclipses for over a thousand years. For the upcoming total solar eclipse crossing North America on April 8, 2024 , two artists have contributed new posters to NASA’s eclipse poster series.

Dongjae “Krystofer” Kim

In the foreground, an illustrated astronaut stands on the Moon. The Moon is gray with several hills. The astronaut is wearing a white suit and holding a rectangular device. On the Moon are large, human-made structures, and there is a satellite above the Moon. Against the black expanse of space, there is Earth. On Earth, there is a large black shadow, representing the Moon's shadow on Earth during a solar eclipse. On the top left of the poster are the words "Solar Eclipse Through the Eyes of NASA". The NASA insignia is at the top right.

Dongjae “Krystofer” Kim is a Senior Science Animator at the Conceptual Image Lab at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. He received a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Design and Technology from Parsons School of Design and a Master of Business Administration and Master of Arts from the Design Leadership program at the Maryland Institute of Contemporary Art and the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. He combines various art and design disciplines, including fine arts, graphic design, creative coding, animation, and design research to help tell NASA’s story.

Where did you get inspiration for the eclipse poster ?

“I was contemplating how the eclipse is an event that is beyond human scale physically and chronologically. It will look differently outside of my myopic view from this planet and it will occur after I am gone for many years to come. With this perspective, I thought of how future space explorations with permanent settlements on the Moon will view this event. While searching for scientific references, I remembered a video piece by our own NASA Goddard media team ‘ An EPIC View of the Moon’s Shadow During the June 10 Solar Eclipse ’ in 2021 and used it as a visual reference.”

What inspired you to become an artist?

“My inspiration came via Pixar and Ghibli animated films and shows I watched as a child. Despite being a little dyslexic Korean kid, I was welcomed into the world of each story. I found it magical that artists could seemingly create everything from nothing or something fantastical from mundane ideas and objects. And I loved that art enables you to communicate your own ideas as well as learn about others creating common ground.”

Want to explore this artwork more? An animated version of this poster is available to download.

Genna Duberstein

Against a background filled with orange and yellow rays, a cartoon dog looks upward. The dog is white with black ears. It is wearing orange eclipse glasses. The eclipse is reflected in the glasses. at the top, it says "Through the eyes of NASA, Total Solar Eclipse 4.8.24, Keep Looking Up." There is a NASA insignia at the top right corner. The artist's signature, Genna Duberstein, is at the bottom right corner.

Genna Duberstein is an award-winning, Emmy-nominated multimedia producer and graphic designer who specializes in both making and marketing content. Her work has been shown internationally, aired on PBS, and has been featured in many outlets, including The New York Times, Vanity Fair, WIRED, The Atlantic, and National Geographic. She holds a Master of Fine Arts from American University and a Bachelor of Arts from The Ohio State University.

“During the 2017 total solar eclipse, my parents sent me a picture of themselves, smiling in eclipse glasses and sitting on their front stoop with their dog. It was such a goofy, happy picture, I wanted to capture that same spirit for the poster. I have a dog of my own now – a goofy, happy American foxhound mix – and he proved to be the perfect model for the total eclipse poster. There’s no denying an eclipse can be an awe-inspiring event, but it can be just plain fun too!”

“I can't help it! I've always made things, and I've been very fortunate to have had support along the way. My parents enrolled me in my first art class at four, and they encouraged me to submit work to art contests all through elementary and high school. Portfolio-based scholarships and commissioned portrait work helped me pay for college. To this day, I'm incredibly lucky to have had a career where I can be creative, and I am thankful for all the people who have made it possible.”

Have an idea for how to put your own spin on this poster? This artwork is also available as a downloadable coloring sheet.

By Abbey Interrante NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

Related Terms

  • 2024 Solar Eclipse
  • Skywatching
  • Solar Eclipses

Discover Related Topics

2024 Total Eclipse

solar system project materials

Eclipse 2024 Citizen Science

solar system project materials

Where & When

solar system project materials

Explore More

solar system project materials

Ride the Wave of Radio Astronomy During the Solar Eclipse  

solar system project materials

NASA-Funded Science Projects Tuning In to ‘Eclipse Radio’

solar system project materials

Spot the King of Planets: Observe Jupiter

Jupiter is easy to observe, and well-documented by astronomers. Learn more about the King of the Planets in February's mid-month article!

The Family Handyman

DIY Solar Water Heater

Complexity:

Solar water heater overview: How a solar hot water system works

If you've ever left a garden hose lying across your lawn on a sunny day and felt the nice hot water coming out the end, you know that sunlight is an effective water heater . Solar hot water systems of yesteryear were often leaky, failure-prone and ineffective, but the industry has matured. Today, you can choose between super-efficient, professionally installed collectors and this less expensive DIY-friendly solar hot water heater system. And if federal tax credits are available or additional state and local incentives, you may be able to recoup your investment in a few years, and enjoy cheaper hot water for years beyond that.

Using a solar water system doesn't mean surrendering the convenience of your regular hot water system. Solar hot water systems are designed to tie into conventional electric and gas water heaters. The tank stores the solar-heated water and serves as a backup heat source. Even if the water from the collector isn't shower-hot, you'll still save money since your tank will have had a head start heating the water. With all solar water systems, it's vital that the panels be installed where they will receive the most direct sunlight. Ideally, you'll want to use a south-facing section of roof. An east- or a west-facing roof will also work, but you'll need additional panels to collect the same amount of heat.

Closed-Loop Solar Heating System

Here's how a solar powered water heater works: When the controller senses that the sun is shining and your tank needs a warm-up, it signals the pump to send water through the black collector panels. The heated water then flows into the storage tank before it's channeled into the heat exchanger. There, it transfers its solar heat to the cooler water coming from your hot water tank. In this closed-loop system, the water in the panel never mixes with the water in the tank, so there's no chance of contamination. When the sun is down or the temperature drops, the controller protects the panel from freezing damage by automatically draining the rooftop panels into the storage tank.

A dependable, affordable DIY solar powered water heater system

Joining roof sections.

The FAFCO kit's push-together fittings mean no fancy pipe joinery or soldering.

Flexible PEX tubing

The FAFCO kit's plastic PEX water lines are simple to cut (the tool is included) and flexible, making them easy to feed down to the utility room.

Leakproof system

Flashing panels complete with rubber grommets make for leakproof roof penetrations. The hold-down straps keep the panels in place.

Until now, most solar hot water systems have required professional installation with a price tag of $4,000 to $8,000.

But here is an affordable (about $2,000) alternative that you can install in a weekend if you have rudimentary plumbing skills. FAFCO's Hot2O system (search fafco online) uses unglazed polymer collectors (photo above) instead of glazed flat-plates. Although the system is less efficient than professionally installed systems, the lightweight panels don't require roof reinforcement and are easy to install.

The kit includes everything you need to connect the solar panels to your existing electric water heater on a single-story house (you may need extra tubing for two-story homes). If you have a gas water heater, you'll need to add a second tank to store the solar-heated water and purchase a hook-up kit from FAFCO. Or you can use your old water heater as the storage tank and replace it with a new, more efficient water heater. The solar-heated water from the second tank is connected to your water heater, saving you energy and money.

Estimate the Payback

To estimate the cost, system size and payback of a solar hot water system for your home, go to the American Solar Energy Society's Web site, ases.org , and click on “Go Solar.” This site can also help you locate a professional installer for higher-efficiency systems to help determine the actual costs.

Required Tools for this solar powered water heater Project

Have the necessary tools for this DIY solar powered water heater project lined up before you start—you’ll save time and frustration. [project-tools]

Required Materials for this solar powered water heater Project

Avoid last-minute shopping trips by having all your materials ready ahead of time. Here's a list. [project-materials]

FH07SEP_SOLWAT_01-2

U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Here’s how you know

Official websites use .gov A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS A lock ( Lock A locked padlock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Insulation Tax Credit

This tax credit is effective for products purchased and installed between January 1, 2023, and December 31, 2032.

  • How to Claim the Federal Tax Credits
  • Strategies to Maximize Your Federal Tax Savings
  • Claim the credits using the IRS Form 5695 .
  • Instructions for Form 5695  
  • Instructions for Form 5695 (Print Version - PDF)

YOU CAN CLAIM:

of project cost

maximum amount credited

Annual Limits on Energy Efficient Home Improvement Tax Credits

In addition to limits on the amount of credit you can claim for any particular equipment installation or home improvement, there are annual aggregate limits.  The overall total limit for an efficiency tax credit in one year is $3,200.  This breaks down to a total limit of $1,200 for any combination of home envelope improvements (windows/doors/skylights, insulation, electrical) plus furnaces, boilers and central air conditioners.  Any combination of heat pumps, heat pump water heaters and biomass stoves/boilers are subject to an annual total limit of $2,000. (Note: ENERGY STAR certified  geothermal heat pumps  are eligible for a separate tax credit and not counted against these limits.)

What products are eligible?

Typical bulk insulation products can qualify, such as batts, rolls, blow-in fibers, rigid boards, expanding spray, and pour-in-place.

Products that air seal (reduce air leaks) can also qualify, as long as they come with a Manufacturers Certification Statement, including:

  • Weather stripping
  • Spray foam in a can, designed to air seal
  • Caulk designed to air seal

See definitions .

More Information

  • ENERGY STAR Seal and Insulate Program
  • Rule Your Attic! with ENERGY STAR
  • Insulation efficiency through Home Performance with ENERGY STAR
  • Heat & Cool Efficiently at Home

currency

Rebate Finder

Look for utility, state, and local rebates in your area.

Ask the Experts logo

At ENERGY STAR

Your go-to resource for the latest advice from ENERGY STAR experts on saving energy at home and work.

HUT Home

ENERGY STAR Home Upgrade

Insulation upgrades qualify for this tax credit.

Who can use this credit?

Principal residence owners.

Must be an existing home & your principal residence. New construction and rentals  do not  apply.

A principal residence is the home where you live most of the time. The home must be in the United States. It can include a house, houseboat, mobile home, cooperative apartment, condominium, and a manufactured home.

How can I maximize my tax credits?

Given the way the annual aggregate limits are structured, it may be prudent to spread your improvements over a few years.   If your heating or cooling system is old, and you are considering a new air source heat pump, it is always wise to  optimize your attic insulation  first, so you don’t pay for more heating and cooling than you actually need.  Making these upgrades together in one year would allow you a tax credit of up to $1,200 for the insulation and up to $2,000 for the heat pump. Similarly, you could combine a heat pump installation with window/door replacements.  In that scenario, the $2,000 credit for the heat pump could be combined with tax credits up to $600 total for the windows/skylights plus $500 for two or more doors. If you replace your water heater the following year, you would be eligible for another 30% tax credit, up to $2,000 plus up to $600 if you need an electric panel upgrade to accommodate the new water heater.

IMAGES

  1. Many Tips And Tricks To Help With DIY Solar Energy Collection -- Click

    solar system project materials

  2. Sistema solar

    solar system project materials

  3. I love building stuff, especially when I get to use paint. My Aunt

    solar system project materials

  4. Solar System Project Ideas For Kids 2023

    solar system project materials

  5. Pin de Lucia Pintos en planetario

    solar system project materials

  6. Elementary school science projects such as building a solar system

    solar system project materials

VIDEO

  1. solar system project

  2. Solar system project #lkg

  3. Solar System

  4. Solar System Model

  5. Solar System Project

  6. solar system/project area

COMMENTS

  1. How to Make a Solar System Model (with Pictures)

    5. Paint the sun. Stick a long skewer into your largest polystyrene ball to hold it in place. Paint the entire surface with gold, yellow, or orange paint to make the sun. Place the skewer in a tall jug or stick the end in a polystyrene block and leave the ball to dry.

  2. 43 Solar System Project Ideas That Are Out Of This World

    5. Solar System Yoga Poses. A little movement goes a long way when littles are learning. Introduce your kiddies to yoga by associating poses with planets and elements of the solar system. This active learning approach not only promotes fitness but also helps them remember the names of planets.

  3. Student Project: Make a Scale Solar System

    Steps: Download the Scale Size and Distance Spreadsheet ( XLSX or CSV) or the Solar System Sizes and Distances reference guide if calculating manually. Decide on the diameter of Earth in your scale model. Keep in mind that a 1-cm Earth means the scale distance from the Sun to Neptune is about two miles.

  4. 14 Science Projects and Lessons About the Solar System

    7. Modeling Gravity. With the Modeling Gravity lesson, students get hands-on with a large sheet, a billiard ball, and marbles to investigate how gravity works on Earth and in the solar system. With the Sun represented by the billiard ball and marbles representing the planets, students explore how the Sun's mass and gravitational force attracts ...

  5. How to Build a 3D Solar System Model with Kids

    Materials to Make a 3D Solar System Model. Here is a list of tools and materials we used to make my daughter's solar system model. Enough cardboard to cut out 8 circles; the smallest circle will be 4 inches in diameter and each consecutive circle will be 1 inch in diameter larger than the last. ¼ inch thick wooden dowel rod, approximately 12 ...

  6. How to Make a Solar System Model at Home for a School Project

    Lay the cardboard box on its side so that the opening faces you. Paint the inside black or a very dark blue. Add a few stars and galaxies with white paint, or with glow-in-the-dark paint for more effect. Sort the plastic foam balls into four sizes. The largest ball should be the sun.

  7. Top 17 Engaging Solar System Projects for Young Astronomers

    Felt Model. This tactile and visual activity is perfect for young students, helping them learn about the solar system in a hands-on, engaging manner. 6. Pom-Pom Solar System. This simple yet effective project enhances understanding of the solar system's structure and is perfect for visual learners. 7.

  8. 31 Solar System Model Project Ideas: A Complete Guide

    What materials do I need for a solar system model project? Common materials for creating a solar system model include styrofoam balls or foam spheres (for planets), paint or markers (for coloring), wire or string (for hanging), glue or adhesive (for attaching planets), and any additional decorative elements you might want to incorporate. ...

  9. Modeling the Structure of the Solar System

    A solar system is made up of a star and all of the objects that orbit it—planets, moons, asteroids, comets and meteoroids. Most stars host their own planets, so there are likely tens of billions of other solar systems in the Milky Way galaxy alone. Solar systems can also have more than one star.

  10. How to Make a Solar System Model

    Attach the semicircular sun to one side, and hang the planets in order, from the sun, in the following sequence: Remember the mnemonic device for this is: M y v ery e ducated m other j ust s erved u s n achos. You can make a solar system model out of many types of materials. The one thing you should keep in mind is scale as the planets are all ...

  11. Student Project: Model How the Solar System Formed

    2. Form a nebula. Roughly 4.5 billion years ago, our solar system formed from a nebula made up of interstellar dust and gas. Start your model by creating this ancient nebula. Use one color of playdough to create 15-20 pea-size balls, and place them on your paper plate. These represent interstellar dust. 3.

  12. How to Make a Solar System Mobile: 15 Steps (with Pictures)

    Cut out Saturn's rings. You will need to trace circles on the styrofoam sheet to do this. Smooth out the edges of the rings using the rounded side of the teaspoon. Trace the diameter of the 4 inch jar onto the center of the styrofoam sheet with a pencil or pen. Center the 3 inch jar in the 4 inch ring you just traced.

  13. Build a Solar System

    Mars. Jupiter. Saturn. Uranus. Neptune. Your child will arrange the planets going out from the sun. The first thing they will do is put each planet on a wooden stick. Then, starting with the sun, then Mercury and so forth until you reach Uranus, put the other end of the wooden stick into the floral foam block.

  14. How to Make a Solar System Model at Home for a School Project

    6. Cut strong thread and set it. Cut two strong thread pieces of the length and width of the box opening. Furthermore, punch two holes with scissors in the center of the top of the box. After that, drop each end of the thread from opposite holes so that all ends fall to the same height.

  15. 8 Solar System Model Project Ideas

    A playdough solar system model is an ideal project for younger children. It won't be too challenging and your children can learn from moulding their model with their hands and exploring different shapes, textures and colours. If possible, try to find lots of different colours of playdough to match the colours of the planets.

  16. Scale Model of the Solar System

    Scale Model of the Solar System. A solar system is a group of planets and other space material orbiting (going around) a star. In our solar system, that star is known as the Sun and the planets are Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. The solar system models you've seen before probably don't show how much bigger ...

  17. 21 Best Solar System Project Ideas for Young Learners

    8. Clothes pin paint stick solar model. A great idea is to turn clothes pins into painted sticks that point to the different planets. Students can create both the planet cloth and decorate the pins. The activity can be adjusted for difficulty and you can require students to label the planets as well. Learn more.

  18. 30 Unique Solar System Project Ideas and Activities for Kids

    In this blog, let's explore 30 solar system project ideas and activities that are both fun and educational, allowing kids to embark on a journey to discover the wonders of the cosmos. 1. Edible Solar System Project ... Using readily available craft materials like Styrofoam balls, paint, and strings, children can create a visually accurate ...

  19. 15 Solar System Project for Kids: DIY Solar System Crafts

    These easy solar system crafts show how easy and fun it is to create these mini versions of the DIY solar system project at home in a variety of fun ways. To make a solar system mobile project for kids, you'll need some cardstock, craft paint, and a few other materials. Print out the solar system templates and cut out the planets.

  20. 53 Solar System Projects for All Learning Styles

    Curate a mini-exhibit about the solar system using various materials and resources. Write a persuasive essay about the importance of space exploration. Hands-on Activities that are Physically Active Science Project Ideas. Create a solar system mobile that rotates. Explain about the rotation and revolution of the planets. Build a rocket model.

  21. Solar System Project: For School, Materials Required & Steps

    The steps to make a solar project are mentioned as follows below: Step 1: Paint the cardboard with black colour and let it dry. Step 2: Paint the balls of different sizes according to their colour and sizes. Step 3: Now place a big ball coloured yellow in the middle. This ball will be the Sun in the solar system.

  22. Exploring the Cosmos: Building the Perfect Solar System Science Fair

    The Formation of the Solar System: Using materials like clay, foam, and a variety of other craft materials, create multiple models of the solar system to demonstrate its formation from a nebula. Solar Flare Effects on Space Weather: Look into how solar flares impact space weather phenomena, such as the auroras on Earth.

  23. Solar System Project for School

    Step 3: Insert the ring for the Saturn planet and place the painted foam balls (planets) as shown in the picture below. Step 4: Stick all the planets, including the Sun, on the cardboard sheet. Step 5: Between Mars and Jupiter planets, cut small pieces of white paper and stick them randomly to represent the asteroid belt. The Solar System ...

  24. Meet the Creators, Part 4: Two New 2024 Total Eclipse Posters

    Total solar eclipses reveal the Sun's outer atmosphere - the corona - a white, wispy halo of solar material that flows out from around the Sun. This atmosphere is breathtaking as it glows in the sky for viewers on Earth, surrounding the dark disk of the Moon. In addition to revealing this normally hidden part of […]

  25. DIY Solar Water Heater

    Time: Complexity: Cost: Solar water heater overview: How a solar hot water system works. If you've ever left a garden hose lying across your lawn on a sunny day and felt the nice hot water coming ...

  26. Insulation Tax Credit

    If your heating or cooling system is old, and you are considering a new air source heat pump, it is always wise to optimize your attic insulation first, so you don't pay for more heating and cooling than you actually need. Making these upgrades together in one year would allow you a tax credit of up to $1,200 for the insulation and up to ...