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How do I assign IPv6 addresses manually?

So I'm still rather clueless with IPv6, but I wanted to try something with my network today. Currently, I assign IPv4 LAN addresses manually, so that my router is 192.168.0.1 , then my first computer is 192.168.0.2 , and so on.

So far, I haven't been able to figure out how to do this with IPv6. Or is the process completely different that this is not how it would work?

Router is an Archer C4000, and my main system runs Ubuntu 19.04

EDIT: To clarify with how I manually set network IP addresses, my router has a page where I can set an address of my choosing to a MAC address. No configuration is done outside of the router.

hiigaran's user avatar

  • Please edit question and indicate how you assign LAN addesses manually. (On the router only? On your first computer as well?) I suspect you just set a network range on the router, and then addresses are not assigned "manually", but by DHCP from the router. On IPv6 then your router needs to advertise a subnet. On Ubuntu, you can set both IPv4 and IPv6 address manually with ip addr add ... . –  dirkt Sep 10, 2019 at 11:22
  • Edited. I'm going to guess then that it is assigned from a range, but then I limit what can be assigned based on MAC addresses. If I'm setting the IP address manually on each device, is there any further configuration that needs to be done (apart from avoiding duplicates), or will the router just accept that device A is going to use its own configured address? –  hiigaran Sep 10, 2019 at 12:00
  • If there's a page where you can assign an IPv4 address based on a MAC address, then this is for static addresses assigned via DHCP from the router. IPv6 works differently. While there is DHCPv6, the normal way is to use SLAAC , and let each computer pick an IPv6 address based on the announced subnet prefix.So this page won't help you to assign IPv6 addresses... –  dirkt Sep 10, 2019 at 12:05

2 Answers 2

To clarify with how I manually set network IP addresses, my router has a page where I can set an address of my choosing to a MAC address. No configuration is done outside of the router

This usually isn't called "manual configuration" to avoid confusion (from the LAN hosts' point of view, it is still automatic configuration). The usual terms are "static DHCP lease" or "DHCP reservation".

Overall, the process in IPv6 is usually completely different.

In IPv6 primary address auto-configuration mechanism (SLAAC) is completely stateless: the router does not issue individual addresses; it only periodically advertises the subnet address prefix and each host just combines it with its own chosen suffix. The router cannot limit hosts to just a specific sub-range; in fact the router does not receive any feedback about hosts' chosen address at all.

(Depending on each device's OS, the suffix might be a MAC address in traditional RFC4862 SLAAC; it might be a static hash value in RFC7217; it might be completely random in RFC4941 "Privacy Extensions"; and it might even be a user-provided value if the OS allows that.)

For example, the router advertises 2001:db8:123:456::/64 as the LAN address prefix; client A combines it with its own MAC address and begins using 2001:db8:123:456:6af2:68fe:ff7c:e25c .

That said, DHCP does exist in the IPv6 world and handles address leases in much the same way as IPv4 DHCP does. That means you can create DHCPv6 address pools, you can configure static address leases in DHCPv6, and so on. But not all clients support DHCPv6 at all (e.g. Android does not), so having SLAAC alongside is almost unavoidable.

So if you have a DHCPv6-capable client on a DHCPv6-capable network, chances are it'll have both a nice DHCPv6-assigned address and a longer SLAAC-autoconfigured address.

If I'm setting the IP address manually on each device, is there any further configuration that needs to be done (apart from avoiding duplicates), or will the router just accept that device A is going to use its own configured address?

As you can see above, that's how IPv6 address configuration works anyway .

u1686_grawity's user avatar

Your router's manual is found in User Guide and contains for IPv6 only an option for entering a static IPv6 address for the router itself (as received from the ISP).

The section about specifying the IP addresses that the router assigns by MAC address does not say whether they are IPv4 or IPv6, but I think it is highly unlikely that this will work for IPv6. And here is why.

IPv6 is quite unlike IPv4 in the sense that the long IPv6 address is made up of two parts. The first (the prefix) is assigned by the ISP. The second is assigned locally by the router or by each computer and is usually a random value based on the MAC address.

This means that the router does not control the IPv6 prefix which the ISP can change whenever it likes. You can force your computer to use a static IPv6 address, but only if it agrees with the ISP. You may be able to ask the ISP for a static IPv6 address, but that is a bad idea.

The reason it's a bad idea, is that all your devices are visible to the entire Internet by their IPv6 address (unless the router intervenes). Therefore having a fixed IPv6 address just makes tracking you that much easier.

If you wish, you would in Windows set a computer's static IPv6 inside Start > Network > Network and Sharing Center > Change Adapter Setting , right-click on the Ethernet connection IPv6 and choose Properties, right-click "Internet Protocol Version 6 (TCP/IPv6)" and click on Properties, the set "Use the following IPv6 address".

But the fact you can does not mean you should. The only place that static IPv6 addresses makes sense is inside a local network which is not connected to the Internet.

harrymc's user avatar

  • What about if I wanted to run a web server? I'm constantly traveling for work, and I would love to have access to one of the computers at home which runs 24/7. I'd need to set a static IPv6 for this to work, wouldn't I? –  hiigaran Sep 10, 2019 at 19:23
  • A general solution would require an IPv6 dynamic DNS provider. See for that the article dynv6.com: IPv6 dynamic DNS done right . –  harrymc Sep 10, 2019 at 19:29
  • @harrymc Help me understand your logic, why would a server in a data center have a static IP but a server at home a dynamic one? In what world does that make any sense? –  Chazy Chaz Jul 29, 2022 at 12:40
  • In a world where the ISP attributes to users dynamic IP addresses. –  harrymc Jul 29, 2022 at 12:51

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how to configure ipv6 on switch

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  • IPv6 Configuration on Cisco Packet Tracer

ipv6-configuration

Table of Contents

IPv6 Configuration

IPv6 is the new version of the most important Network Layer Protocol IP. With this new IP version, IPv6, beside different features, some configuration differencies are also coming. In this lesson, we will focus on these IPv6 Configuration Steps, IPv6 Configuration on Cisco devices . We will use the below Packet Tracer topology for our IPv6 Config .

You can download Packet Tracer IPv6 Lab , in Packet Tracer Labs page.

In this configuration lesson, we will follow the below IPv6 Configuration steps :

Enable IPv6 Globally

Enable ipv6 on interface, configure eui-64 format global unicast address, configure manual global unicast address, manual link local address configuration, auto ipv6 address configuration, enable dhcpv6 client, ipv6 verification commands.

  So, let’s go to the IPv6 Configuration steps and configure IPv6 for Cisco routers .

After going to the configuration mode with “ configure terminal ” command, to enable IPv6 on a Cisco router, “ ipv6 unicast-routing ” command is used. With this Cisco command, IPv6 is enabled globally on the router. This can be used before both interface configurations and IPv6 Routing Protocol configurations.

Router 1# configure terminal Router 1(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing Router 2# configure terminal Router 2(config)# ipv6 unicast-routing

After enabling IPv6 globally, we should enable IPv6 under the Interfaces. To enable IPv6 under an interface, we will use “ ipv6 enable ” command. Let’s enable IPv6 on two interfaces of each router.

Router 1 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/0 Router 1 (config-if)# ipv6 enable Router 1 (config-if)# no shutdown Router 1 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/1 Router 1 (config-if)# ipv6 enable Router 1 (config-if)# no shutdown
Router 2 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/0 Router 2 (config-if)# ipv6 enable Router 2 (config-if)# no shutdown Router 2 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/1 Router 2 (config-if)# ipv6 enable Router 2 (config-if)# no shutdown

EUI-64 format is the IPv6 format used to create IPv6 Global Unicast Addresses . It is a specific format that we have also talked about before. With this format, basically, interface id of the whole IPv6 adderess is ceated with the help of the MAC address. After that, this created interface id is appended to the network id.

To configure an interface with EUI-64 format (Extended Unique Identifier), firstly we will go under the interface, then we will use “ ip address ipv6-address/prefix-length eui-64 ” command. Here, our IPv6 address and prefix-length are 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64. The real EUI-64 Global Unicast Address will be created with this address and MAC address after IPv6 configuration.

Router 1 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/0 Router 1(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64 eui-64 Router 1(config-if)# end

Let’s check the IPv6 address that is created with EUI-64 format with “ show ipv6 interface brief ” command.

Router 1# show ipv6 interface brief FastEthernet0/0            [up/up] FE80::2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 FastEthernet0/1            [up/up] FE80::2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7702 Vlan1                      [administratively down/down] unassigned

If we do not use EUI-64 format address, we have to write the whole IPv6 Address to the configuration line. Let’s configure Gigabit Ethernet 0/0 interface of Router 2 manually .

Router 2 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/0 Router 2 (config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234/64 Router 2(config-if)# end

Here, both of these directly connected interfaces are in the same subnet, the Network ID is same (2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64).

Let’s check the IPv6 address that we have manually assigned with “ show ipv6 interface brief ” command.

Router 2# show ipv6 interface brief FastEthernet0/0            [up/up] FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD01     2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234 FastEthernet0/1            [administratively up/up] FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD02 Vlan1                      [administratively down/down] unassigned

To check the connectivity between two node, we use ping. As IPv4, with IPv6, we also use ping, but this time it is called IPv6 Ping . The format of IPv6 Ping is a little difference than IPv4 Ping. These  differences are the format of the used IP address and the used keywords. With IPv6 Ping , “ ping ipv6 ” keywords are used before the destination IPv6 address.

Here, we will ping from Router 1 GigabitEthernet0/0 interface to Router 2 GigabitEthernet0/0 interface.

Router 1# ping ipv6 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234   Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 0/0/1 ms

To check the configured IPv6 Address, we can use “ show ipv6 interface interface-name ” command.

Router 1# show ipv6 interface FastEthernet0/0 FastEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 No Virtual link-local address(es): Global unicast address(es): 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 , subnet is 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64 [EUI] Joined group address(es): FF02::1 FF02::2 FF02::1:FF0E:7701 MTU is 1500 bytes ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds ICMP redirects are enabled ICMP unreachables are sent ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1 ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds ND advertised reachable time is 0 (unspecified) ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 (unspecified) ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds ND advertised default router preference is Medium Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
Router 2# show ipv6 interface FastEthernet0/0 FastEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD01 No Virtual link-local address(es): Global unicast address(es):     2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234 , subnet is 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64 Joined group address(es): FF02::1 FF02::2 FF02::1:FF15:BD01 FF02::1:FF34:1234 MTU is 1500 bytes ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds ICMP redirects are enabled ICMP unreachables are sent ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1 ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds ND advertised reachable time is 0 (unspecified) ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 (unspecified) ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds ND advertised default router preference is Medium Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.

Here, with ipv6 ping, there are some options that we can use. These are given below:

ping ipv6 [hostname | ip_address] [repeat repeat-count | size datagram-size | source [ interface-name | source-address ]

  • repeat : Ping packet count. The default ping repeat value is 5.
  • size : Datagram size. The default value ping size is 56 bytes.
  • source : Source Address of the ping. Default value is None.

So if we would like to send 10 IPv6 ping packet with 200 byte datagrams from 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234 to 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444, we will use the below command:

Router 2 # ping ipv6 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444 repeat 10 size 200 source 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234

To configure a Link Locak address manually, we use “ ipv6 address link-local ipv6-address ” command. Here, we should write an IPv6 address in the range of Link Local addresses. If you would like to learn more about a Link Local Address, you can check Link Local Address lesson.

Let’s configure GigabitEthernet0/1 interface of Router 1 with Link Local Address FE80::AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:DDDD. Here, there is no need to write a prefix length but we will add link-local keyword at the end of the command.

Router 1 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/1 Router 1 (config-if)# ipv6 address FE80::AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:DDDD link-local Router 1 (config-if)# end

Let’s check the manually configure ipv6 Link-Local address with “ show ipv6 interface brief ” command.

Router 1# show ipv6 interface brief FastEthernet0/0            [up/up] FE80::2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 FastEthernet0/1            [administratively down/down]     FE80::AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:DDDD Vlan1                      [administratively down/down] unassigned

IPv6 Addresses can be configured automatically. This is one of the most important characteristics coming with IPv6. For IPv6 Auto configuration , we will use “ ipv6 address autoconfig ” command. Let’s use it on Router 2 on GigabitEthernet0/1.

Router 2 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/1 Router 2 (config-if)# ipv6 address autoconfig Router 2 (config-if)# end

This type of IPv6 address configuration is Sateless Auto Configuration .

Let’s check the Autoconfigured Link-Local ipv6 address with “ show ipv6 interface brief ” command.

Router 2# show ipv6 interface brief FastEthernet0/0            [up/up] FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD01 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234 FastEthernet0/1            [up/down]     FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD02 Vlan1                      [administratively down/down] unassigned

Let’s ping from Router 2 to Router 1 to test this second interfaces’ ipv6 connection.

Router 2# ping ipv6 FE80::AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:DDDD Output Interface: FastEthernet0/1 Type escape sequence to abort. Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to FE80::AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:DDDD, timeout is 2 seconds: !!!!! Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 0/0/1 ms

To enable DHCPv6 Client function on an interface, we use “ ipv6 address dhcp ” command under this interface. With this command, interface gets its IPv6 address form the DHCPv6 server . Let’s enable DHCPv6 on GigabitEthernet0/2 of Router 2.

Router 1 (config)# interface FastEthernet0/1 Router 1 (config-if)# ipv6 address dhcp Router 1 (config)# end

To verify DHCPv6 enabled interfaces, we can use “ show ipv6 dhcp interface ” command.

Router 1 # show ipv6 dhcp interface

To verify IPv6 Configuration, we can use different show commands. These IPv6 show commands are given below

  • To check IPv6 interface configuration and status we use “ show ipv6 interface interface-id ”.
Router 1# show ipv6 interface FastEthernet0/0 FastEthernet0/0 is up, line protocol is up IPv6 is enabled, link-local address is FE80::2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701 No Virtual link-local address(es): Global unicast address(es): 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701, subnet is 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64 [EUI] Joined group address(es): FF02::1 FF02::2 FF02::1:FF0E:7701 MTU is 1500 bytes ICMP error messages limited to one every 100 milliseconds ICMP redirects are enabled ICMP unreachables are sent ND DAD is enabled, number of DAD attempts: 1 ND reachable time is 30000 milliseconds ND advertised reachable time is 0 (unspecified) ND advertised retransmit interval is 0 (unspecified) ND router advertisements are sent every 200 seconds ND router advertisements live for 1800 seconds ND advertised default router preference is Medium Hosts use stateless autoconfig for addresses.
  • To check IPv6 neighbor cache entries we use “ show ipv6 neighbors ”.
Router 1# show ipv6 neighbors IPv6 Address                              Age Link-layer Addr State Interface 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1234:1234:1234:1234    23 0006.2A15.BD01  REACH Fa0/0 FE80::206:2AFF:FE15:BD02                    7 0006.2A15.BD02  REACH Fa0/1
  • To check IPv6 Routing Table we use “ show ipv6 route ”.
Router 1# show ipv6 route   IPv6 Routing Table – 3 entries Codes: C – Connected, L – Local, S – Static, R – RIP, B – BGP U – Per-user Static route, M – MIPv6 I1 – ISIS L1, I2 – ISIS L2, IA – ISIS interarea, IS – ISIS summary O – OSPF intra, OI – OSPF inter, OE1 – OSPF ext 1, OE2 – OSPF ext 2 ON1 – OSPF NSSA ext 1, ON2 – OSPF NSSA ext 2 D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external C   2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC::/64 [0/0] via ::, FastEthernet0/0 L   2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:2E0:B0FF:FE0E:7701/128 [0/0] via ::, FastEthernet0/0 L   FF00::/8 [0/0] via ::, Null0
  • To check IPv6 DHCP we use “ show ipv6 dhcp ”.
Router 1# show ipv6 dhcp This device’s DHCPv6 unique identifier (DUID): 0003000100E0B00E7701
  • To check IPv6 Protocols we use “ show ipv6 protocols ”.
Router 1# show ipv6 protocols IPv6 Routing Protocol is “connected” IPv6 Routing Protocol is “static

Questions For IPv6 Configuration

Question 1: with which command do we enable ipv6 globally for ipv6 configuration.

a) ipv6 enable

b) ipv6 unicast-routing

c) ipv6 no shutdown

d) ipv6 run

Question 2: Which command enables IPv6 under an interface?

Question 3: which command enables auto ipv6 addressing under an interface .

a) ipv6 auto

d) ipv6 address autoconfig

e) ipv6 run

Question 4: Which command enables DHCPv6 under an interface?

a) ipv6 auto dhcp

b) ipv6 address dhcp

c) ipv6 address autoconfig

d) ipv6 dhcp run

e) ipv6 dhcp on

Question 5: How to send 20 ping packet to 001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444 address?

a) ping ipv6 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444 source 20

b) ping ipv6 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444 size 20

c) ping ipv6 2001:AAAA:BBBB:CCCC:1111:2222:3333:4444 repeat 20

Answers: 1) b     2) a    3) d    4) b    5) c   

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Configuring a static IPv6 address on a VLAN

This option enables configuring of unique, static unicast IPv6 addresses for global and link-local applications, including:

link-local unicast (including EUI and non-EUI interface identifiers)

global unicast (and unique local unicast)

Statically configuring a link-local unicast address

[no] ipv6 address fe80:: <interface-id> link-local

If IPv6 is not already enabled on the VLAN, this command enables IPv6 and configures a static link-local address. If IPv6 is already enabled on the VLAN, this command overwrites the current, link-local address with the specified static address. (One link-local address is allowed per VLAN interface.) <interface-id> The low-order 64 bits, in 16-bit blocks, comprise this value in a link-local address: xxxx xxxx : xxxx xxxx : xxxx xxxx : xxxx xxxx

Where a static link-local address is already configured, a new, autoconfigured global unicast addresses assignment uses the same interface identifier as the link-local address.

NOTE: An existing link-local address is replaced, and is not deprecated, when a static replacement is configured. The prefix for a statically configured link-local address is always 64 bits, with all blocks after fe80 set to zero. That is: fe80:0:0:0.

After verification of uniqueness by DAD, a statically configured link-local address status is set to preferred , with a permanent lifetime.

For link-local addressing, the no form of the static IPv6 address command produces different results, depending on how IPv6 is configured on the VLAN:

If IPv6 was enabled only by a statically configured link-local address, deleting the link-local address disables IPv6 on the VLAN.

If other IPv6-enabling commands have been configured on the VLAN, deleting the statically configured link-local address causes the switch to replace it with the default (EUI-64) link-local address for the VLAN, and IPv6 remains enabled.

See also Disabling IPv6 on a VLAN .

Statically configuring a global unicast address

[no] ipv6 address [ <network-prefix> <interface-id> | <prefix-length> ]
[no] ipv6 address [ <network-prefix> ::/ <prefix-length> eui-64 If IPv6 is not already enabled on a VLAN, either of these command options do the following: enable IPv6 on the VLAN configure a link-local address using the EUI-64 format statically configure a global unicast address If IPv6 is already enabled on the VLAN, the above commands statically configure a global unicast address, but have no effect on the current link-local address. After verification of uniqueness by DAD, the lifetime of a statically configured IPv6 address assigned to a VLAN is set to permanent and is configured as a preferred address. The no form of the command erases the specified address and, if no other IPv6-enabling command is configured on the VLAN, disables IPv6 on the VLAN. <network-prefix> : This includes the global routing prefix and the subnet ID for the address. <interface-id> : Enters a user-defined interface identity. <prefix-length> : Specifies the number of bits in the network prefix. If you are using the eui-64 option, this value must be 64. eui-64 : Specifies using the Extended Unique Identifier (EUI) format to create an interface identifier based on the VLAN MAC address.

Viewing the currently configured static IPv6 addresses per-VLAN

To view the currently configured static IPv6 addresses per-VLAN, use show run commands.

show ipv6 Lists IPv6 addresses for all VLANs configured on the switch.
show ipv6 vlan <vid> Lists IPv6 addresses configured on VLAN <vid> .

For more information, see Viewing the current IPv6 addressing configuration .

Operating notes

With IPv6 enabled, the switch determines the default IPv6 router for the VLAN from the RAs it receives. (See Router access and default router selection .)

If DHCPv6 is configured on a VLAN, then configuring a static global unicast address on the VLAN removes DHCPv6 from the VLAN's configuration and deletes the DHCPv6-assigned global unicast address.

Note that for a statically configured global unicast address to be routable, a gateway router must be transmitting RAs on the VLAN.

If an autoconfigured global unicast address already exists for the same subnet as a new, statically configured global unicast address, the statically configured address is denied. In the reverse case, you can add an autoconfig command to the VLAN configuration, but it will not be implemented unless the static address is removed from the configuration.

Duplicate address detection (DAD) for statically configured addresses

Statically configured IPv6 addresses are designated as permanent. If DAD determines that a statically configured address duplicates a previously configured and reachable address on another device belonging to the VLAN, the more recent, duplicate address is designated as duplicate . For more on this topic, see:

Duplicate Address Detection (DAD) .

Viewing the current IPv6 addressing configuration

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ConfigNetworks

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how to configure ipv6 on switch

  • IPv6 / Switching

How to enable IPv6 support on a Cisco catalyst 3560 Switch

by Ali · August 17, 2014

Yes it is an old Switch, but for a lab environment, we can use it. 🙂

In this article, we’ll see how to upgrade the Cisco Catalyst3560 Switch to support IPv6. A small picture just for you!!

If you have tried to configure IPv6 on this Switch model (a layer 3 switch), you may have noticed that the IPv6 commands are not working. Let’s see this in action:

 If you look at the description of this switch, you’ll see that it supports the IPv6 protocol. So where are these commands hiding?

In fact the 3560 Switch has a feature called Switch Database Management (SDM). SDM helps the switch to manage the resource allocation of every feature. This means that there are some features that are disabled in the default template. So, if we want to work with these features, we need to enable them.

Let’s take a look at the default template:

 You can see that default template supports 8 routed interfaces and 1024 VLANs. So there is no IPv6 feature enabled. So let’s enable it:

You can see that there are a lot of templates, and dual-Ipv4-and-IPv6 is the template that we’re interested in. So we’ll choose this template:

Here, you can see that there are a lot of options for this template; this means that we can give more resources to IPv4 and IPv6 routing, or more resources to VLAN. For us, we will choose the default options.

 I think that the message is clear! The SDM preferences will take effect after the reload of the Switch.

Let’s see it his is true!

 You can see that IPv6 feature is enabled on the Switch. And now, we can enable the Ipv6 unicast-routing globally.

 Note that I used the 3560 IOS version 12.2.55-SE9.

I hope this was helpful for you, and if it was, just leave a comment.

Tags: IPv6 SWITCHING

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Switch Your Network To IPv6

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Introduction

IPv6 is an "emerging" technology that has been emerging for some time…at least in the U.S. Development on IPv6 began in the mid 1990’s and here we are in 2015 with most of the U.S. yet to implement IPv6. (Google statistics show that less than 14% of the US has adopted IPv6.)

Interest in IPv6 is increasing, though. With IPv4 addresses nearly exhausted, ISPs, network device manufacturers and even end-users are taking notice and deploying or working on implementing IPv6.

I covered some IPv6 terms and basics a few years back. So this article is intended as a practical how-to for moving a home/SOHO network to an IPv6 internet connection.

Before we start, it’s important to note that IPv4 and IPv6 are not mutually exclusive. In fact, you can and will likely use both at the same time. A network running both IPv4 and IPv6 is said to be “dual stacked.” IPv4 may be phased out over time. But it is likely we’ll be running in dual stack mode for some time.

Making The Switch

Step 1: Determine whether your Interent Service Provider (ISP) supports IPv6

The best way is to check your ISP’s help pages, or do a quick search using your ISP’s name and "IPv6". Or as a last resort, you could even call customer support.

The road to IPv6 was a long one for me. My ISP was Windstream and I wanted to experiment with IPv6. But Windstream didn’t support it. Periodically, I’d call customer service and ask if they supported IPv6. But the Windstream customer service usually didn’t understand my question and couldn’t provide an answer.

However, I recently switched to Time Warner as my ISP, prompted by a new customer promotion. After switching, I noticed on Time Warner’s website that “TWC has rolled out IPv6 to over 90% of its residential network”. So, I set about getting an IPv6 internet connection.

Step 2: Determine whether your modem and router support IPv6

ISPs that support IPv6 usually list supported devices. (Time Warner lists supported devices here .) My modem is a Motorola SB6121 and is listed as "approved for use with Time Warner Cable high-speed data services and supports IPv6." You can access the SB6121 at 192.168.100.1 , but the only available option is to reset it. I didn’t have to change anything on the cable modem to enable IPv6.

Since I’m not using a Time Warner router, I was on my own figuring out if my router supports IPv6. Fortunately, I recently reviewed the Linksys LRT224 router and worked with one of their engineers, who assured me the LRT224 supports IPv6.

If you don’t have a friend at your router’s maker, dig into your router’s admin pages and look for IPv6 settings. The ones you want are usually found in the WAN configuration section. Here’s the relatively simple options provided on an old Linksys E4200 . I suspect they would not be much help in getting a working IPv6 connection.

Linksys E4200 IPv6 WAN connection options

Linksys E4200 IPv6 WAN connection options

Here are more comprehensive options on a D-Link DIR-615 , which look like they would provide a better shot at getting you connected.

D-Link DIR-615 WAN connection options

D-Link DIR-615 WAN connection options

As noted earlier, other devices on your network, such as switches, access points, and internal network devices, do not need to support IPv6 for you to deploy IPv6. They will continue to operate at IPv4. But you should have at least one device that supports IPv6. You’ll need it to determine whether you have a proper IPv6 internet connection. Fortunately, Windows 7 and above and MacOS 10 both support IPv6.

Making the Switch – more

Step 3: Enable IPv6 on your router

To enable IPv6 on the LRT224, I enabled dual-stack in the IP Mode screen in the Setup > Network menu, as shown below.

Enable IPv6

Enable IPv6

Once I enabled dual-stack, I noticed the WAN interface on my router now had a global IPv6 address, but my PCs did not. A global IPv6 address is similar to what we refer to as a "public" IPv4 address. Global IPv6 addresses typically have a first digit of 2 .

In addition to the IPv6 address on my WAN interface, I knew I needed a global IPv6 subnet (also known as a prefix) to assign to my LAN, but I had no idea how to get one. I called Time Warner for guidance, but received none, to put it politely. Eventually, I reached out to Linksys and they told me to enable the DHCP-PD feature on the router. DHCP-PD (PD = Prefix Delegation) is a component of DHCPv6, which is the version of DHCP used for IPv6 addressing.

In the below screenshot, you can see DHCP-PD enabled on the LRT224 and an IPv6 prefix successfully received from Time Warner. (Note, in the below screenshot and others throughout this article, I’ve replaced digits of my actual IPv6 addresses with “xxxx.” Since these are globally accessible IPv6 addresses, it isn’t wise to publish them on the Internet.)

DHCP-PD

With DHCP-PD enabled, an end user’s router will send a DHCPv6 request to the ISP for an IPv6 address and an IPv6 prefix. The ISP will respond with an IPv6 address for the router’s WAN interface and an IPv6 prefix the router can use for the LAN.

As shown in the below wireshark output of the DHCPv6 reply from Time Warner to my LRT224, I received a WAN IPv6 address of 2606:a000:dfc0:15:a1f4:4829:a55d:xxxx , a LAN IPv6 prefix length = 64 and a LAN prefix = 2606:a000:1205:xxxx: . Subsequently, and as I’ll show in Step 4, devices on my LAN will get an IPv6 address starting with 2606:a000:1205:xxxx .

DHCPv6 Wireshark trace

DHCPv6 Wireshark trace

Note that a /64 prefix is typically the smallest IPv6 subnet assigned since it is required for SLAAC (stateless address autoconfiguration) to work (more on SLAAC shortly). But it’s possible to subnet an IPv6 address to a smaller subnet than /64 if you use DHCPv6 or static addressing. In case you’re wondering, a /64 IPv6 subnet is 2 64 addresses, i.e. 18,446,744,073,709,551,616. Enjoy!

Step 4: Get an IPv6 address on your device

This should happen automatically for IPv6-enabled devices. But a quick way to force it to happen on a Windows 7 or higher system is to type ipconfig /release and then ipconfig /renew from the command prompt. Once complete, type ipconfig /all . The output will look something like that below.

Notice the line labeled Temporary IPv6 address with an arrow next to it on the left. This is a global IPv6 address my PC uses when I go to a public IPv6 website. Notice that the first half of that address matches the prefix I received via DHCP-PD.

ipconfig /all

ipconfig /all

A new issue with IPv6 is Stateless Address Autoconfiguration (SLAAC). SLAAC is an IPv6 method devices use to request network information and generate their own unique IPv6 addresses without a DHCP server. Windows labels addresses generated via SLAAC as “Temporary.” In this case, the global IPv6 address my Windows PC is using has been generated via SLAAC.

SLAAC is considered a more efficient means of delivering IPv6 addresses, as a DHCP server isn’t needed and router resources aren’t consumed maintaining a list of devices and their associated address. The downside is SLAAC eliminates the convenience of viewing a DHCP table on the router, displaying devices and their IP addresses. On the LRT224, the DHCPv6 server is disabled by default. You can manually configure DHCPv6 on the LRT224, which would then provide the ability to see devices and their IPv6 addresses.

You’ll also notice an IPv6 device has multiple IPv6 addresses. It is common for a device to have multiple IPv6 addresses, each with a different purpose. In addition to global addresses, other IPv6 address types include link-local addresses, multicast addresses and unique local addresses.

Link-local addresses, which start with FE80 , are automatically created by IPv6 enabled devices for local communication only and are not routable addresses. Multicast addresses, which start with FF , are used for various purposes, such as to request router information via IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Protocol (NDP). Unique local addresses, which start with FC , are similar to private addresses in IPv4. However, since Network Address Translation (NAT) is typically not used in IPv6, the use of unique local IPv6 addresses has limitations.

Clearly, all these addresses are going to require a change in the way we think about LAN address space!

Verification

IPv6 is now enabled on my network and all devices capable of running IPv6 should be good to go. My Windows 7 and Windows 8 PCs all had global IPv6 addresses without any configuration. My Macbook running MacOS 10.9.5 and my iPhone 4 running iOS 7.0.4 also had global IPv6 addresses without any action on my part.

To verify IPv6 is working, just browse to test-ipv6.com . This website will tell you the global IPv6 address used by your device and verify your IPv6 functionality. As you can see from the screenshot below, the test shows my PC is communicating via IPv6 over the Internet. Notice also that the IPv6 address detected by the IPv6 test site matches the IPv6 address displayed in the ipconfig /all output shown above.

Test IPv6

Another useful test is to type ping google.com from the command line. Google has enabled IPv6, and since IPv6 is now supported on my network, my PC will use IPv6 when communicating to an IPv6 enabled destination. As you can see from the ping output, I’m getting an IPv6 response from google.com to my ping.

Ping IPv6

The above test also illustrates the “intelligence” of IPv6. You don’t have to decide when to use IPv6. An IPv6 enabled device will use IPv6 when available and fall back to IPv4 when necessary. In the above example, my PC first did a DNS lookup on google.com and received both IPv6 and IPv4 addresses. You can try this yourself. On an IPv6-enabled system, type nslookup google.com from the command line. As you can see below, the DNS lookup returned both the IPv6 address and IPv4 addresses for google.com.

IPv6 and DNS

IPv6 and DNS

As mentioned previously, IPv6 eliminates the need for NAT for IP address conservation. However, NAT’s "firewall" provides a measure of security by hiding the IPv4 addresses of LAN devices from the Internet. With global IPv6 addresses, NAT is not needed to share a measly single (temporary) IPv4 address, grudgingly assigned by your ISP; you have 18,446,744,073,709,551,616 addresses! But devices that haven’t made the jump to IPv6 will still need your router’s NAT to share that single IPv4 WAN IP. IPv6 traffic, on the other hand, will simply be routed.

Without NAT, I wondered whether the LRT224 firewall would provide any protection for devices with IPv6 addresses, so again I reached out to Linksys. Linksys informed me that the LRT224 firewall “by default will block a connection initiated from the WAN side unless access rules allow it.” So just because an IPv6 address is "global", doesn’t mean it can be freely accessed outside your LAN. Whew!

Further investigation of the LRT224 showed it had a section for both IPv4 and IPv6 in its firewall settings. Below is a screenshot of the IPv6 Access Rules. The default configuration on the LRT224 firewall is the same for both IPv4 and IPv6; all traffic initiated from the WAN blocked by default and all traffic initiated from the LAN allowed. As with IPv4, you can still open ports to a specific device, but that can be tricky, given the lack of DHCP client lists. I’ll come back to this in a follow-on piece.

IPv6 Firewall

IPv6 Firewall

Closing thoughts.

Certainly, there are pros and cons to IPv6. On the pro side, IPv6 provides unlimited addresses and resolves the issue with IPv4 address exhaustion. Another value to IPv6 is improved connectivity. NAT can be problematic for protocols like VPN tunnels and VoIP. NAT can cause call connection and call quality problems for VoIP users. NAT can also cause problems if you want to host a server, perhaps for gaming or some other purpose. Having a global IPv6 address on your VoIP device or game server removes NAT from the equation and improves connectivity.

IPv6 also opens up a lot of cool new technologies. Many IPv6 enabled routers support IPv6 technologies such as 6to4 and 6rd. 6to4 allows IPv6 packets to be sent over an IPv4 network. 6to4 can be useful if you’re trying to connect to a IPv6 destination and your ISP does not yet support IPv6. 6rd refers to IPv6 rapid deployment and is similar to 6to4, as it also provides a means to transmit IPv6 over an IPv4 network. IPv6 also holds the promise of increased security by supporting IPsec security between IPv6 endpoints.

I think the biggest downside to IPv6 is the lack of information and relative immaturity of the technology. I had the benefit of using a Linksys LRT224 with direct access to Linksys engineering to figure out DHCP-PD. However, the manual for the LRT224 doesn’t even mention DHCP-PD. Regarding maturity, IPv6 is not a new technology, but it is still new to ISPs, device manufacturers and customers. IPv6 has a lot more advantages than the few points I’ve mentioned, but it is going to take some time before those advantages are simplified enough so the majority of us can understand and use them.

My experience shows Time Warner has IPv6 working, at least in my area. Comcast also appears to be relatively far along in its deployment of IPv6. Here’s a link to Comcast’s IPv6 site and Comcast’s list of supported devices .

how to configure ipv6 on switch

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Software Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15.2(2)E (Catalyst 2960, 2960-S, 2960-SF and 2960-Plus Switches)

Bias-free language.

The documentation set for this product strives to use bias-free language. For the purposes of this documentation set, bias-free is defined as language that does not imply discrimination based on age, disability, gender, racial identity, ethnic identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and intersectionality. Exceptions may be present in the documentation due to language that is hardcoded in the user interfaces of the product software, language used based on RFP documentation, or language that is used by a referenced third-party product. Learn more about how Cisco is using Inclusive Language.

  • Using the Command-Line Interface
  • Assigning the Switch IP Address and Default Gateway
  • Configuring Cisco IOS Configuration Engine
  • Administering the Switch
  • Configuring Web-Based Authentication
  • Managing Switch Stacks
  • Clustering Switches
  • Configuring SDM Templates
  • Configuring Switch-Based Authentication
  • Configuring IEEE 802.1x Port-Based Authentication
  • Configuring Interface Characteristics
  • Configuring Auto-MDIX
  • Configuring System MTU
  • Configuring PoE
  • Configuring VLANs
  • Configuring VMPS
  • Configuring VLAN Trunks
  • Configuring VTP
  • Configuring Voice VLANs
  • Configuring Spanning Tree Protocol
  • Configuring Multiple Spanning-Tree Protocol
  • Configuring Optional Spanning-Tree Features
  • Configuring Flex Links and the MAC Address-Table Move Update Feature
  • Configuring DHCP
  • Configuring IP Source Guard
  • Configuring Dynamic ARP Inspection
  • Configuring Port-Based Traffic Control
  • Configuring UniDirectional Link Detection
  • Configuring the Cisco Discovery Protocol
  • Configuring LLDP, LLDP-MED, and Wired Location Service
  • Configuring SPAN and RSPAN
  • Configuring RMON
  • Configuring System Message Logging and Smart Logging
  • Configuring SNMP
  • Configuring Cisco IP SLAs
  • Configuring Network Security with ACLs
  • Configuring QoS
  • Configuring Auto-QoS
  • Configuring Static IP Routing
  • Configuring IPv6 MLD Snooping

Configuring IPv6 Routing

  • Configuring IPv6 ACLs
  • Configuring EtherChannels
  • Configuring Link-State Tracking
  • Troubleshooting the Software Configuration
  • Configuring Online Diagnostics
  • Working with the Cisco IOS File System, Configuration Files, and Software Images

Clear Contents of Search

Chapter: Configuring IPv6 Routing

Finding feature information, ipv6 addresses, 128-bit wide unicast addresses, dns for ipv6, neighbor discovery, ipv6 stateless autoconfiguration and duplicate address detection, ipv6 applications, dual ipv4 and ipv6 protocol stacks, snmp and syslog over ipv6, http(s) over ipv6, default ipv6 configuration, configuring ipv6 addressing and enabling ipv6 routing, configuring ipv6 icmp rate limiting (cli), configuring static routing for ipv6 (cli), displaying ipv6, configuring ipv6 addressing and enabling ipv6 routing: example, configuring ipv6 icmp rate limiting: example, configuring static routing for ipv6: example, displaying ipv6: example.

Your software release may not support all the features documented in this module. For the latest caveats and feature information, see Bug Search Tool and the release notes for your platform and software release. To find information about the features documented in this module, and to see a list of the releases in which each feature is supported, see the feature information table at the end of this module.

Use Cisco Feature Navigator to find information about platform support and Cisco software image support. To access Cisco Feature Navigator, go to http://www.cisco.com/go/cfn . An account on Cisco.com is not required.

Information About Configuring IPv6 Host Functions

This chapter describes how to configure IPv6 host functions on the Catalyst 2960, 2960-S, and 2960-C.

For information about configuring IPv6 Multicast Listener Discovery (MLD) snooping, see Configuring MLD Snooping .

To enable dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6) on a Catalyst 2960 switch, you must configure the switch to use the a dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template. See the "Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks" section . This template is not required on Catalyst 2960-S switches.

Understanding IPv6

IPv4 users can move to IPv6 and receive services such as end-to-end security, quality of service (QoS), and globally unique addresses. The IPv6 address space reduces the need for private addresses and Network Address Translation (NAT) processing by border routers at network edges.

For information about how Cisco Systems implements IPv6, go to:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6553/products_ios_technology_home.html

For information about IPv6 and other features in this chapter

See the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library .

Use the Search field on Cisco.com to locate the Cisco IOS software documentation. For example, if you want information about static routes, you can enter Implementing Static Routes for IPv6 in the search field to learn about static routes.

The switch supports only IPv6 unicast addresses. It does not support site-local unicast addresses, or anycast addresses.

The IPv6 128-bit addresses are represented as a series of eight 16-bit hexadecimal fields separated by colons in the format: n:n:n:n:n:n:n:n. This is an example of an IPv6 address:

2031:0000:130F:0000:0000:09C0:080F:130B

For easier implementation, leading zeros in each field are optional. This is the same address without leading zeros:

2031:0:130F:0:0:9C0:80F:130B

You can also use two colons (::) to represent successive hexadecimal fields of zeros, but you can use this short version only once in each address:

2031:0:130F::09C0:080F:130B

For more information about IPv6 address formats, address types, and the IPv6 packet header, see the “Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity” chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

IPv6 Address Formats

IPv6 Address Type: Multicast

IPv6 Address Output Display

Simplified IPv6 Packet Header

Supported IPv6 Unicast Routing Features

These sections describe the IPv6 protocol features supported by the switch:

Support on the switch includes expanded address capability, header format simplification, improved support of extensions and options, and hardware parsing of the extension header. The switch supports hop-by-hop extension header packets, which are routed or bridged in software.

The switch supports aggregatable global unicast addresses and link-local unicast addresses. It does not support site-local unicast addresses.

Aggregatable global unicast addresses are IPv6 addresses from the aggregatable global unicast prefix. The address structure enables strict aggregation of routing prefixes and limits the number of routing table entries in the global routing table. These addresses are used on links that are aggregated through organizations and eventually to the Internet service provider.

These addresses are defined by a global routing prefix, a subnet ID, and an interface ID. Current global unicast address allocation uses the range of addresses that start with binary value 001 (2000::/3). Addresses with a prefix of 2000::/3(001) through E000::/3(111) must have 64-bit interface identifiers in the extended unique identifier (EUI)-64 format.

Link local unicast addresses can be automatically configured on any interface by using the link-local prefix FE80::/10(1111 1110 10) and the interface identifier in the modified EUI format. Link-local addresses are used in the neighbor discovery protocol (NDP) and the stateless autoconfiguration process. Nodes on a local link use link-local addresses and do not require globally unique addresses to communicate. IPv6 routers do not forward packets with link-local source or destination addresses to other links.

For more information, see the section about IPv6 unicast addresses in the “Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

IPv6 supports Domain Name System (DNS) record types in the DNS name-to-address and address-to-name lookup processes. The DNS AAAA resource record types support IPv6 addresses and are equivalent to an A address record in IPv4. The switch supports DNS resolution for IPv4 and IPv6.

The Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) in IPv6 generates error messages, such as ICMP destination unreachable messages, to report errors during processing and other diagnostic functions. In IPv6, ICMP packets are also used in the neighbor discovery protocol and path MTU discovery.

The switch supports NDP for IPv6, a protocol running on top of ICMPv6, and static neighbor entries for IPv6 stations that do not support NDP. The IPv6 neighbor discovery process uses ICMP messages and solicited-node multicast addresses to determine the link-layer address of a neighbor on the same network (local link), to verify the reachability of the neighbor, and to keep track of neighboring routers.

The switch supports ICMPv6 redirect for routes with mask lengths less than 64 bits. ICMP redirect is not supported for host routes or for summarized routes with mask lengths greater than 64 bits.

Neighbor discovery throttling ensures that the switch CPU is not unnecessarily burdened while it is in the process of obtaining the next hop forwarding information to route an IPv6 packet. The switch drops any additional IPv6 packets whose next hop is the same neighbor that the switch is actively trying to resolve. This drop avoids further load on the CPU.

The switch uses stateless autoconfiguration to manage link, subnet, and site addressing changes, such as management of host and mobile IP addresses. A host autonomously configures its own link-local address, and booting nodes send router solicitations to request router advertisements for configuring interfaces.

For more information about autoconfiguration and duplicate address detection, see the “Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity” chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

The switch has IPv6 support for these applications:

Ping, traceroute, Telnet

Secure Shell (SSH) over an IPv6 transport

HTTP server access over IPv6 transport

DNS resolver for AAAA over IPv4 transport

Cisco Discovery Protocol (CDP) support for IPv6 addresses

For more information about managing these applications, see the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

This figure shows a router forwarding both IPv4 and IPv6 traffic through the same interface, based on the IP packet and destination addresses.

how to configure ipv6 on switch

Use the dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template to enable IPv6 routing dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6). For more information about the dual IPv4 and IPv6 SDM template, see Configuring SDM Templates .

The dual IPv4 and IPv6 templates allow the switch to be used in dual stack environments.

If you try to configure IPv6 without first selecting a dual IPv4 and IPv6 template, a warning message appears.

In IPv4-only environments, the switch routes IPv4 packets and applies IPv4 QoS and ACLs in hardware. IPv6 packets are not supported.

In dual IPv4 and IPv6 environments, the switch applies IPv4 QoS and ACLs in hardware .

If you do not plan to use IPv6, do not use the dual stack template because this template results in less hardware memory capacity for each resource.

For more information about IPv4 and IPv6 protocol stacks, see the “Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity” chapter of Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

To support both IPv4 and IPv6, IPv6 network management requires both IPv6 and IPv4 transports. Syslog over IPv6 supports address data types for these transports.

SNMP and syslog over IPv6 provide these features:

Support for both IPv4 and IPv6

IPv6 transport for SNMP and to modify the SNMP agent to support traps for an IPv6 host

SNMP- and syslog-related MIBs to support IPv6 addressing

Configuration of IPv6 hosts as trap receivers

For support over IPv6, SNMP modifies the existing IP transport mapping to simultaneously support IPv4 and IPv6. These SNMP actions support IPv6 transport management:

Opens User Datagram Protocol (UDP) SNMP socket with default settings

Provides a new transport mechanism called SR_IPV6_TRANSPORT

Sends SNMP notifications over IPv6 transport

Supports SNMP-named access lists for IPv6 transport

Supports SNMP proxy forwarding using IPv6 transport

Verifies SNMP Manager feature works with IPv6 transport

For information on SNMP over IPv6, including configuration procedures, see the “Managing Cisco IOS Applications over IPv6” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

For information about syslog over IPv6, including configuration procedures, see the “Implementing IPv6 Addressing and Basic Connectivity” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

The HTTP client sends requests to both IPv4 and IPv6 HTTP servers, which respond to requests from both IPv4 and IPv6 HTTP clients. URLs with literal IPv6 addresses must be specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons.

The accept socket call chooses an IPv4 or IPv6 address family. The accept socket is either an IPv4 or IPv6 socket. The listening socket continues to listen for both IPv4 and IPv6 signals that indicate a connection. The IPv6 listening socket is bound to an IPv6 wildcard address.

The underlying TCP/IP stack supports a dual-stack environment. HTTP relies on the TCP/IP stack and the sockets for processing network-layer interactions.

Basic network connectivity ( ping ) must exist between the client and the server hosts before HTTP connections can be made.

For more information, see the “Managing Cisco IOS Applications over IPv6” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

Configuring IPv6

This section describes how to assign IPv6 addresses to individual Layer 3 interfaces and to globally forward IPv6 traffic on the switch.

Before configuring IPv6 on the switch, consider these guidelines:

Be sure to select a dual IPv4 and IPv6 SDM template.

In the ipv6 address interface configuration command, you must enter the ipv6-address and ipv6-prefix variables with the address specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons. The prefix-length variable (preceded by a slash [/]) is a decimal value that shows how many of the high-order contiguous bits of the address comprise the prefix (the network portion of the address).

To forward IPv6 traffic on an interface, you must configure a global IPv6 address on that interface. Configuring an IPv6 address on an interface automatically configures a link-local address and activates IPv6 for the interface. The configured interface automatically joins these required multicast groups for that link:

solicited-node multicast group FF02:0:0:0:0:1:ff00::/104 for each unicast address assigned to the interface (this address is used in the neighbor discovery process.)

all-nodes link-local multicast group FF02::1

all-routers link-local multicast group FF02::2

For more information about configuring IPv6 routing, see the “Implementing Addressing and Basic Connectivity for IPv6” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to assign an IPv6 address to a Layer 3 interface and enable IPv6 forwarding:

ICMP rate limiting is enabled by default with a default interval between error messages of 100 milliseconds and a bucket size (maximum number of tokens to be stored in a bucket) of 10.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to change the ICMP rate-limiting parameters:

Before configuring a static IPv6 route, you must enable routing by using the ip routing global configuration command, enable the forwarding of IPv6 packets by using the ipv6 unicast-routing global configuration command, and enable IPv6 on at least one Layer 3 interface by configuring an IPv6 address on the interface.

For more information about configuring static IPv6 routing, see the “Implementing Static Routes for IPv6” chapter in the Cisco IOS IPv6 Configuration Library on Cisco.com.

administrative distance —(Optional) An administrative distance. The range is 1 to 254; the default value is 1, which gives static routes precedence over any other type of route except connected routes. To configure a floating static route, use an administrative distance greater than that of the dynamic routing protocol.

Returns to privileged EXEC mode.

Use one of the following:

  • show ipv6 static [ ipv6-address | ipv6-prefix/prefix length ] [ interface interface-id ] [ detail ]][ recursive ] [ detail ]
  • show ipv6 route static [updated]

Verifies your entries by displaying the contents of the IPv6 routing table.

interface interface-id —(Optional) Displays only those static routes with the specified interface as an egress interface.

recursive —(Optional) Displays only recursive static routes. The recursive keyword is mutually exclusive with the interface keyword, but it can be used with or without the IPv6 prefix included in the command syntax.

For valid recursive routes, the output path set, and maximum resolution depth.

For invalid routes, the reason why the route is not valid.

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Saves your entries in the configuration file.

For complete syntax and usage information on these commands, see the Cisco IOS command reference publications.

Configuration Examples for IPv6 Unicast Routing

This example shows how to enable IPv6 with both a link-local address and a global address based on the IPv6 prefix 2001:0DB8:c18:1::/64. The EUI-64 interface ID is used in the low-order 64 bits of both addresses. Output from the show ipv6 interface EXEC command is included to show how the interface ID (20B:46FF:FE2F:D940) is appended to the link-local prefix FE80::/64 of the interface.

This example shows how to configure an IPv6 ICMP error message interval of 50 milliseconds and a bucket size of 20 tokens.

This example shows how to configure a floating static route to an interface with an administrative distance of 130:

This is an example of the output from the show ipv6 interface privileged EXEC command:

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how to configure ipv6 on switch

pfSense » pfSense Docs

New content #15278.

how to configure ipv6 on switch

Switch from IPv4 to IPv6 + Add IPv6 capability to exist IPv4-only configuration

Added by Sergei Shablovsky about 12 hours ago. Updated 37 minutes ago.

Description

Dear Brilliant pfSense DevTeam!

REASON - most of all network equipment (from home teapot and fridge to servers, routers and atomic clocks) already have IPv6 address; - most of all firewalls and network equipment able to work with IPv6 addresses; - total numbers of hackers, cyber-terrorists and specialized digital army forces attacks SIGNIFICANTLY (x2-5 times more) INCREASING last 2-3 years (and would be more) and MOST OF THEM USING IPv4 BASED technologies and protocols. But using IPv6 able to decreasing the numbers of attacks, vectors of attacks and eliminate vulnerabilities in infrastructure.

SUBJ Switch from IPv4 to IPv6 using and Add IPv6 capability to exist IPv4-only configuration

documents MAKE EASY FOR pfSense USERS shift to IPv6.

Step-by-step instructions.

  • Property changes

Updated by Jim Pingle 37 minutes ago

  • Status changed from New to Rejected

We already add IPv6 content where we can over time, but the current state of ISPs/servers (especially in the US, where the bulk of customers are located) is nowhere near a place where we can prioritize it or do IPv6 only or even deprioritize IPv4.

Also available in: Atom PDF

IMAGES

  1. FaceITNet: Enable IPv6 on CISCO 2960 Switch

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

  2. How to configure IPV6 DHCP pool by using Multi -layer switch

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

  3. How to Configure an IP address on a switch

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

  4. How do I enter an IPv6 address into a router

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

  5. ¿Cómo configurar IPv6 en el enrutador CISCO?

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

  6. How to Configure IPv6 on CISCO Router?

    how to configure ipv6 on switch

VIDEO

  1. 10 SWITCH 2 0 IPv6 Stateless Autoconfiguration Operation

  2. IPv6 8 LAB Cisco Switch Router Advertisment

  3. IPv6 2 LAB Cisco Switch

  4. Understanding IPv4 Addressing

  5. شرح مبسط ل Configuring IPv6 Addressing

  6. 23- IPv4 Routing

COMMENTS

  1. Catalyst 2960-X Switch IPv6 Configuration Guide, Cisco IOS Release 15.0

    To enable dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6) on a Catalyst 2960 switch, you must configure the switch to use the a dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template. See the "Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks" section. This template is not required on Catalyst 2960-S switches. Note

  2. Configuration Example: IPv6 Inter-VLAN Communication

    $31.99 (Save 20%) Configuration Example: IPv6 Inter-VLAN Communication Figure 3-2 shows the network topology for the configuration that follows, which demonstrates how to configure IPv6 inter-VLAN communication using commands covered in this chapter. Some commands used in this configuration are from previous chapters.

  3. Configuring basic IPv6 connectivity on a Layer 3 switch

    To configure basic IPv6 connectivity on a Brocade Layer 3 Switch, you must: Enable IPv6 routing globally on the switch Configure an IPv6 address or specifically enable IPv6 on each router interface over which you plan to forward the IPv6 traffic Configure IPv4 and IPv6 protocol stacks.

  4. How to Enable IPv6 on a Cisco Router?

    First, enable IPv6 routing on a Cisco router using the 'ipv6 unicast-routing' global configuration command. This command globally enables IPv6 and must be the first command executed on the router. Configure the IPv6 global unicast address on an interface using the 'ipv6 address address/prefix-length [eui-64]' command.

  5. How do I assign IPv6 addresses manually?

    Follow edited Sep 10, 2019 at 11:58 asked Sep 10, 2019 at 11:14 hiigaran 239 2 3 10 Please edit question and indicate how you assign LAN addesses manually. (On the router only? On your first computer as well?) I suspect you just set a network range on the router, and then addresses are not assigned "manually", but by DHCP from the router.

  6. Enable IPv6 on CISCO 2960 Switch

    Enable IPv6 on CISCO 2960 Switch - Packet Tracer. Enable IPv6 on CISCO 2960 Switch - Packet Tracer.

  7. Example for Configuring IPv6 Addresses for Interfaces

    Procedure. Enable the IPv6 forwarding function on switches. # Configure SwitchA. < HUAWEI > system-view [HUAWEI] sysname SwitchA [SwitchA] ipv6 # Configure SwitchB. < HUAWEI > system-view [HUAWEI] sysname SwitchB [SwitchB] ipv6 Configure IPv6 addresses for the interfaces.

  8. 9 Steps

    Table of Contents IPv6 Configuration Enable IPv6 Globally Enable IPv6 on Interface Configure EUI-64 Format Global Unicast Address Configure Manual Global Unicast Address IPv6 Ping Manual Link Local Address Configuration Auto IPv6 Address Configuration Enable DHCPv6 Client IPv6 Verification Commands Questions For IPv6 Configuration

  9. Configuring a static IPv6 address on a VLAN

    With IPv6 enabled, the switch determines the default IPv6 router for the VLAN from the RAs it receives. (See Router access and default router selection.). If DHCPv6 is configured on a VLAN, then configuring a static global unicast address on the VLAN removes DHCPv6 from the VLAN's configuration and deletes the DHCPv6-assigned global unicast address.

  10. How to enable IPv6 support on a Cisco catalyst 3560 Switch

    If you have tried to configure IPv6 on this Switch model (a layer 3 switch), you may have noticed that the IPv6 commands are not working. Let's see this in action: 3560 (config)#ipv6 ? % Unrecognized command. If you look at the description of this switch, you'll see that it supports the IPv6 protocol.

  11. Switch Your Network To IPv6

    Step 1: Determine whether your Interent Service Provider (ISP) supports IPv6 The best way is to check your ISP's help pages, or do a quick search using your ISP's name and "IPv6". Or as a last resort, you could even call customer support. The road to IPv6 was a long one for me. My ISP was Windstream and I wanted to experiment with IPv6.

  12. Configuring IPv6 Routing

    To enable dual stack environments (supporting both IPv4 and IPv6) on a Catalyst 2960 switch, you must configure the switch to use the a dual IPv4 and IPv6 switch database management (SDM) template. See the "Dual IPv4 and IPv6 Protocol Stacks" section. This template is not required on Catalyst 2960-S switches. Note

  13. Enabling and configuring IPv6 on a Cisco router

    139 Share 18K views 3 years ago How to enable IPv6 on a Cisco router and the configure and verify IPv6 addresses, including global unicast and link-local addresses. Also includes showing the...

  14. How to check if switch is ipv6 fully compatible

    2. For pure layer-2 switching, any switch is compatible with IPv6 - or rather IPv6 can be transported over any switched network. A layer-2 device like a switch doesn't see or care about higher-layer protocols. If you need layer-3 functions on the switch (routing between ports or VLANs, filtering based on IP addresses, or similar) you'll need to ...

  15. New Content #15278: Switch from IPv4 to IPv6 + Add IPv6 capability to

    But using IPv6 able to decreasing the numbers of attacks, vectors of attacks and eliminate vulnerabilities in infrastructure. SUBJ Switch from IPv4 to IPv6 using and Add IPv6 capability to exist IPv4-only configuration. documents MAKE EASY FOR pfSense USERS shift to IPv6. Step-by-step instructions.