• Countries Who Spend the Most Time Doing Homework

Homework levels across the world vary greatly by country.

Homework is an important aspect of the education system and is often dreaded by the majority of students all over the world. Although many teachers and educational scholars believe homework improves education performance, many critics and students disagree and believe there is no correlation between homework and improving test scores.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) is an intergovernmental organization. With headquarters in Paris, the organization was formed for the purpose of stimulating global trade and economic progress among member states. In 2009, the OECD conducted a detailed study to establish the number of hours allocated for doing homework by students around the world and conducted the research in 38 member countries. The test subjects for the study were 15 year old high school students in countries that used PISA exams in their education systems. The results showed that in Shanghai, China the students had the highest number of hours of homework with 13.8 hours per week. Russia followed, where students had an average of 9.7 hours of homework per week. Finland had the least amount of homework hours with 2.8 hours per week, followed closely by South Korea with 2.9 hours. Among all the countries tested, the average homework time was 4.9 hours per week.

Interpretation of the data

Although students from Finland spent the least amount of hours on their homework per week, they performed relatively well on tests which discredits the notion of correlation between the number of hours spent on homework with exam performance. Shanghai teenagers who spent the highest number of hours doing their homework also produced excellent performances in the school tests, while students from some regions such as Macao, Japan, and Singapore increased the score by 17 points per additional hour of homework. The data showed a close relation between the economic backgrounds of students and the number of hours they invested in their homework. Students from affluent backgrounds spent fewer hours doing homework when compared to their less privileged counterparts, most likely due to access to private tutors and homeschooling. In some countries such as Singapore, students from wealthy families invested more time doing their homework than less privileged students and received better results in exams.

Decline in number of hours

Subsequent studies conducted by the OECD in 2012 showed a decrease in the average number hours per week spent by students. Slovakia displayed a drop of four hours per week while Russia declined three hours per week. A few countries including the United States showed no change. The dramatic decline of hours spent doing homework has been attributed to teenager’s increased use of the internet and social media platforms.

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homework statistics in singapore

Time spent on homework also varies among students depending on their socio-economic background.

“In every country and economy that participated in PISA 2012, socio-economically advantaged students spend more time doing homework or other study required by their teachers than disadvantaged students.”

However, the amount of time spent on homework is not linked to the school system’s overall performance.

“This implies that other factors, such as the quality of instruction and how schools are organised, have a greater impact on a school system’s overall performance,” they said.

9.4 hours is ‘reasonable’

A Ministry of Education spokesperson reportedly said that the average of 9.4 hours Singapore students spend on homework is “fairly reasonable for upper-secondary students, who would be preparing for the national examinations”.

Associate Professor Jason Tan from the National Institute of Education (NIE) said that the number of hours is not “overwhelming” considering the number of subjects students in the country are taking.

“The 9.4 hours do not seem that overwhelming, when students are taking six to nine subjects in Secondary 3… but (the report) also doesn't give any indication of the subjects the time is spent on, or the nature of homework, so it's hard to draw any conclusions from this,” he was quoted by  The Straits Times   as saying.

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Students in these countries spend the most time doing homework

Even the protesters in Hong Kong had homework.

Teens in Shanghai spend 14 hours a week on homework, while students in Finland spend only three. And although there  are some educational theorists who argue for  reducing or abolishing homework, more homework seems to be helping students with test scores.

That’s according to a new report on  data the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development collected from countries  and regions that participate in a standardized test  to measure academic achievement for 15-year-olds, the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA).

Image for article titled Students in these countries spend the most time doing homework

(It should be noted that while Shanghai scored highest on the 2012 PISA mathematics test, Shanghai is not representative of all of mainland China, and the city received criticism for only testing a subset of 15-year-olds to skew scores higher.)

While there are likely many other factors that contribute to student success, homework assigned can be an indicator of PISA test scores for individuals and individual schools, the report notes. In the individual schools in some regions—Hong Kong, Japan, Macao, and Singapore—that earned the highest math scores  (pdf, pg. 5) in 2012, students saw an increase of 17 score points or more per extra hour of homework.

The report also notes, however, that while individuals may benefit from homework, a school system’s overall performance relies more on other factors, such as instructional quality and how schools are organized.

On average, teachers assign 15-year-olds around world about five hours of homework each week. But those average hours don’t necessarily tell the whole story. Across countries, students spending less time on homework aren’t necessarily studying less—in South Korea, for example, 15-year-olds spend about three hours on homework a week, but they spend an additional 1.4 hours per week with a personal tutor, and 3.6 hours in after-school classes , well above the OECD average for both, according to the OECD survey.

Within countries, the amount of time students spend on homework varies based on family income: Economically advantaged students spend an average of 1.6 hours more on homework per week than economically disadvantaged students. This might be because wealthier students are likely have the resources for a quiet place to study at home, and may get more encouragement and emphasis on their studies from parents, writes Marilyn Achiron , editor for OECD’s Directorate for Education and Skills.

It should also be noted that this list only includes countries that take the PISA exam, which mostly consists of OECD member countries, and it also includes countries that are  OECD partners with “enhanced engagement,”  such as parts of China and Russia.

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MATHEMATICS HOMEWORK: A STUDY OF THREE GRADE EIGHT CLASSROOMS IN SINGAPORE

  • Published: 14 September 2010
  • Volume 9 , pages 187–206, ( 2011 )

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  • BERINDERJEET KAUR 1  

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This paper explores the nature and source of mathematics homework and teachers’ and students’ perspectives about the role of mathematics homework. The subjects of the study are three grade 8 mathematics teachers and 115 of their students. Data from field notes, teacher interviews and student questionnaire are analysed using qualitative methods. The findings show that all 3 teachers gave their students homework for instructional purposes to engage them in consolidating what they were taught in class as well as prepare them for upcoming tests and examinations. The homework only involved paper and pencil, was compulsory, homogenous for the whole class and meant for individual work. The main source of homework assignments was the textbook that the students used for the study of mathematics at school. ‘Practice makes perfect’ appeared to be the underlying belief of all 3 teachers when rationalising why they gave their students homework. From the perspective of the teachers, the role of homework was mainly to hone skills and comprehend concepts, extend their ‘seatwork into out of class time’ and cultivate a sense of responsibility. From the perspectives of the students, homework served 6 functions, namely improving/enhancing understanding of mathematics concepts, revising/practising the topic taught, improving problem-solving skills, preparing for test/examination, assessing understanding/learning from mistakes and extending mathematical knowledge.

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KAUR, B. MATHEMATICS HOMEWORK: A STUDY OF THREE GRADE EIGHT CLASSROOMS IN SINGAPORE. Int J of Sci and Math Educ 9 , 187–206 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-010-9237-0

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Received : 21 October 2009

Accepted : 16 August 2010

Published : 14 September 2010

Issue Date : February 2011

DOI : https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-010-9237-0

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3 in 4 Singapore students fear failure, higher than global average: OECD study

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SINGAPORE — Singapore students are among those who are most afraid of failure, a study by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has found.

In the OECD’s latest Programme for International Student Assessment (Pisa) test, 72 per cent of Singapore students said they worry about what others would think of them if they fail and 78 per cent said they would have doubts about their future if they were failing.

homework statistics in singapore

Wong Pei Ting

SINGAPORE — Singapore students are among those who are most afraid of failure, a study by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has found.

In the OECD’s latest Programme for International Student Assessment (Pisa) test, Singapore has the highest percentage of students (78 per cent) agreeing or strongly agreeing with the phrase, “When I am failing, this makes me doubt my plans for the future”, when compared with those from other countries.

And 72 per cent of Singapore students said that they worry about what others would think of them if they fail — the ninth highest score among the economies studied.

Students in Taipei (89 per cent), Hong Kong (82 per cent) and Macau (80 per cent) resonated the most with this sentiment.

Singapore’s numbers are well above the result seen among the 37 OECD member countries, where 54 per cent of students on average agreed with the first statement and 56 per cent agreed with the second.

This was the first time that OECD measured a fear of failure in its Pisa test, which is done once every three years and also looks at how students around the world fare academically. 

Singapore’s results are not ideal, as OECD said in its Pisa questionnaire framework that the “optimal learner is high in work mastery and low in fear of failure”.

The framework referenced research showing that a fear of failure causes students to be self-protective and avoid challenging situations and opportunities that are essential for learning and development.

In response to this finding, the Ministry of Education (MOE) said in a statement that it recognises that excessive fear can be disabling, although a rational and moderate sense of fear may motivate students to work hard and strive for better performance.

The ministry noted that across the 79 economies that took part in Pisa, students in higher-performing educational systems were more afraid of failure.

“This is congruent with research findings that a moderate amount of fear, taken in a positive spirit, can be productive and motivate students to work harder,” it said.

It also said that students here could have reflected more fear in Pisa because most of the 15-year-olds who did the survey in 2018 were in Secondary 4 and would be sitting for their GCE O- or N-Level exams at the end of that year.

“Their fears could stem from the desire to do well in national examinations,” MOE added.

Nonetheless, the ministry said that it would be building on existing efforts to help students develop a growth mindset and a resilience to bounce back from failure, and to view setbacks as opportunities to learn and grow.

Indeed, a “growth mindset” was one of the things that the OECD study measured. It found that Singapore students scored below the OECD average in this aspect as well.

About 60 per cent of Singapore students possess a growth mindset and believe that their intelligence is something that they can enhance, while the OECD average is 63 per cent.

MOE said it also plans to help students appreciate that there are multiple pathways and opportunities to pursue their passions and interests, and that academic performance alone does not define their self-worth or prospects in life.

The ministry said that it is already in the process of reducing students’ fear of failure, by encouraging students to move away from an overemphasis on academic results with the new Primary School Leaving Examination’s (PSLE's) scoring system.

In 2016, it announced that the aggregate score for the PSLE — a T-score that grades students very finely — will be replaced with wider scoring bands from 2021.

MOE said that the rollout of full subject-based banding and the removal of academic streams in secondary schools by 2024 will also help to encourage students here to adopt a growth mindset and take greater ownership of their learning.

Fear of failure was one of three achievement motives that were studied in Pisa. The other two were competitiveness, which the study defined as a desire to outperform others, and work mastery, a desire to work hard to master tasks.

In the competitiveness measure, 76 per cent of Singapore students said they felt it was true that students are competing against each other, while the OECD average is 50 per cent.

In terms of work mastery, 68.3 per cent of male Singapore students and 61 per cent of female Singapore students agreed or strongly agreed to this phrase, "If I am not good at something, I would rather keep struggling to master it than move on to something I may be good at". 

The OECD average is 67.8 per cent among male students, and 65.7 per cent among female students.

Taken together, the indicators go towards assessing the personality-based context in which students approach or avoid learning.

“They are the result of a lifetime of socialisation from parents, teachers, coaches and one’s cultural surroundings, and they capture how behaviour is energised over time,” OECD said.

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Homework In Singapore - Culture or Necessity

Homework In Singapore  Culture or Necessity

Homework – A Common Conversational Starter

“Did the teacher give any homework today?”

“Take out your Student Handbook and check if there is any homework.”

“Got e-learning assignment for this weekend?”

Homework is easily one of the most common topics in daily conversations between parents and their children in primary school nowadays. Ironically, more often than not, the above questions come before questions such as “ How’s your day? ” or “ What did you have for recess this morning? ”

The School Homework Policy

There is actually a set of guidelines governing the topic of homework in all schools on our lovely little red dot. It is named the School Homework Policy. It defines homework as “any learning activity” that each school requires their students to complete after school hours. The rationale for homework serves to allow educators to address learning gaps, if any, among the students in their respective subject classes. At the same time, it enables parents to gain a more accurate picture of their children’s learning progress.

What do Teachers and Parents feel about Homework?

Nonetheless, there seem to be a growing divergence in the mindsets of both educators and parents towards the concept of homework. One of the key reasons educators give homework is actually to show parents what is being covered in school. This is often communicated through instructions posted on different mediums such as the common student handbook and mobile apps like ClassDojo. In fact, ClassDojo is fast gaining popularity as the app where parents access daily to check what homework there is and to communicate with teachers any concerns they might have.

At the same time, there are increasingly more parents who feel homework takes away time from their children for leisure activities such as sports or even running about with their friends in the safety of their neighbourhood. On a more serious note, there also appear to be parents who seem to be overly involved in their children’s homework. You can probably identify them by the way they try to get their children to follow instructional techniques that differ greatly from what their teachers had used or the manner in which they give a fixed duration for their children to complete all their homework.

Is Homework Beneficial?

In Singapore, the general guideline for time spent on homework is about 30 minutes to an hour for Primary 1-2 students, 1-1.5 hour for Primary 3 and 4 students and 1.5-2 hours for Primary 5 and 6 students. Nevertheless, each school will tell you that it varies from student to student and that the above applies to the average student. So, the key question is What is an average student?

There is clearly no definitive answer to the above question. Numerous educational studies have established a positive correlation between homework and academic achievement. Hence, there appears to be proven value in the completion of homework. Nonetheless, many experienced teachers will share with you that on many an occasion, they will find, to their disbelief, that some students who steadfastly complete their homework, actually lag behind some peers who may be late or forget to complete their homework.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, educators should take into account the unique needs and circumstances of their students and families with regards to homework.

E.g. 1 - A teacher gives an extra day to a particular student for homework submission as the child is required by his parents to help out at their food stall till evening.

E.g. 2 – A student who is still mastering the foundational concepts of a topic is instructed to complete only the knowledge and comprehension-based questions rather than the application-based questions.

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Teacher Chin has more than a decade of experience in teaching English from Primary Two to Primary Six in local primary schools. He is presently, in his free time, having immense enjoyment experimenting with the Nimzo-Indian Defence in chess and trying out the Apacs Lethal 9 in badminton doubles.

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11 Surprising Homework Statistics, Facts & Data

homework pros and cons

The age-old question of whether homework is good or bad for students is unanswerable because there are so many “ it depends ” factors.

For example, it depends on the age of the child, the type of homework being assigned, and even the child’s needs.

There are also many conflicting reports on whether homework is good or bad. This is a topic that largely relies on data interpretation for the researcher to come to their conclusions.

To cut through some of the fog, below I’ve outlined some great homework statistics that can help us understand the effects of homework on children.

Homework Statistics List

1. 45% of parents think homework is too easy for their children.

A study by the Center for American Progress found that parents are almost twice as likely to believe their children’s homework is too easy than to disagree with that statement.

Here are the figures for math homework:

  • 46% of parents think their child’s math homework is too easy.
  • 25% of parents think their child’s math homework is not too easy.
  • 29% of parents offered no opinion.

Here are the figures for language arts homework:

  • 44% of parents think their child’s language arts homework is too easy.
  • 28% of parents think their child’s language arts homework is not too easy.
  • 28% of parents offered no opinion.

These findings are based on online surveys of 372 parents of school-aged children conducted in 2018.

2. 93% of Fourth Grade Children Worldwide are Assigned Homework

The prestigious worldwide math assessment Trends in International Maths and Science Study (TIMSS) took a survey of worldwide homework trends in 2007. Their study concluded that 93% of fourth-grade children are regularly assigned homework, while just 7% never or rarely have homework assigned.

3. 17% of Teens Regularly Miss Homework due to Lack of High-Speed Internet Access

A 2018 Pew Research poll of 743 US teens found that 17%, or almost 2 in every 5 students, regularly struggled to complete homework because they didn’t have reliable access to the internet.

This figure rose to 25% of Black American teens and 24% of teens whose families have an income of less than $30,000 per year.

4. Parents Spend 6.7 Hours Per Week on their Children’s Homework

A 2018 study of 27,500 parents around the world found that the average amount of time parents spend on homework with their child is 6.7 hours per week. Furthermore, 25% of parents spend more than 7 hours per week on their child’s homework.

American parents spend slightly below average at 6.2 hours per week, while Indian parents spend 12 hours per week and Japanese parents spend 2.6 hours per week.

5. Students in High-Performing High Schools Spend on Average 3.1 Hours per night Doing Homework

A study by Galloway, Conner & Pope (2013) conducted a sample of 4,317 students from 10 high-performing high schools in upper-middle-class California. 

Across these high-performing schools, students self-reported that they did 3.1 hours per night of homework.

Graduates from those schools also ended up going on to college 93% of the time.

6. One to Two Hours is the Optimal Duration for Homework

A 2012 peer-reviewed study in the High School Journal found that students who conducted between one and two hours achieved higher results in tests than any other group.

However, the authors were quick to highlight that this “t is an oversimplification of a much more complex problem.” I’m inclined to agree. The greater variable is likely the quality of the homework than time spent on it.

Nevertheless, one result was unequivocal: that some homework is better than none at all : “students who complete any amount of homework earn higher test scores than their peers who do not complete homework.”

7. 74% of Teens cite Homework as a Source of Stress

A study by the Better Sleep Council found that homework is a source of stress for 74% of students. Only school grades, at 75%, rated higher in the study.

That figure rises for girls, with 80% of girls citing homework as a source of stress.

Similarly, the study by Galloway, Conner & Pope (2013) found that 56% of students cite homework as a “primary stressor” in their lives.

8. US Teens Spend more than 15 Hours per Week on Homework

The same study by the Better Sleep Council also found that US teens spend over 2 hours per school night on homework, and overall this added up to over 15 hours per week.

Surprisingly, 4% of US teens say they do more than 6 hours of homework per night. That’s almost as much homework as there are hours in the school day.

The only activity that teens self-reported as doing more than homework was engaging in electronics, which included using phones, playing video games, and watching TV.

9. The 10-Minute Rule

The National Education Association (USA) endorses the concept of doing 10 minutes of homework per night per grade.

For example, if you are in 3rd grade, you should do 30 minutes of homework per night. If you are in 4th grade, you should do 40 minutes of homework per night.

However, this ‘rule’ appears not to be based in sound research. Nevertheless, it is true that homework benefits (no matter the quality of the homework) will likely wane after 2 hours (120 minutes) per night, which would be the NEA guidelines’ peak in grade 12.

10. 21.9% of Parents are Too Busy for their Children’s Homework

An online poll of nearly 300 parents found that 21.9% are too busy to review their children’s homework. On top of this, 31.6% of parents do not look at their children’s homework because their children do not want their help. For these parents, their children’s unwillingness to accept their support is a key source of frustration.

11. 46.5% of Parents find Homework too Hard

The same online poll of parents of children from grades 1 to 12 also found that many parents struggle to help their children with homework because parents find it confusing themselves. Unfortunately, the study did not ask the age of the students so more data is required here to get a full picture of the issue.

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Interpreting the Data

Unfortunately, homework is one of those topics that can be interpreted by different people pursuing differing agendas. All studies of homework have a wide range of variables, such as:

  • What age were the children in the study?
  • What was the homework they were assigned?
  • What tools were available to them?
  • What were the cultural attitudes to homework and how did they impact the study?
  • Is the study replicable?

The more questions we ask about the data, the more we realize that it’s hard to come to firm conclusions about the pros and cons of homework .

Furthermore, questions about the opportunity cost of homework remain. Even if homework is good for children’s test scores, is it worthwhile if the children consequently do less exercise or experience more stress?

Thus, this ends up becoming a largely qualitative exercise. If parents and teachers zoom in on an individual child’s needs, they’ll be able to more effectively understand how much homework a child needs as well as the type of homework they should be assigned.

Related: Funny Homework Excuses

The debate over whether homework should be banned will not be resolved with these homework statistics. But, these facts and figures can help you to pursue a position in a school debate on the topic – and with that, I hope your debate goes well and you develop some great debating skills!

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

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  • Published by: Tutor City
  • October 06, 2020

Is doing homework really useful? A Singaporean’s Viewpoint

You have probably heard some people say that we demand too much from the young generation, and they may have had a point. An average student in Singapore spends approximately 10 hours a week doing homework (behind only China and Russia).

But the number of hours may not be directly proportional to the quality of education . The Russian education system doesn’t perform exceptionally well on the world’s education rankings, whereas the education system in Singapore is said to be the best in the world.

It is also noteworthy that the global average for doing homework is around five hours , so Singaporean students are definitely working hard.

This report was based on the results of a questionnaire given out by the OECD to 15-year-olds . Approximately 510,000 students took part in the test. They had to give answers regarding the environment in which they lived and studies, the subjects they studied at school, and their attitude towards those subjects.

So, the question arises; does “more hours spent on homework” equal “better results,” and if it doesn’t, then what brings those positive results?

It is about quality, not quantity.

While it is true that homework, in general, does enable the child to grasp new material better, the goal should be to give the child the right kind of homework to do . Several assignments specifically targeted at developing certain skills may bring more benefits to the student than a large number of random exercises.

Also, this high-quality workload should increase gradually as the years go by. Ten hours a week may be perfectly reasonable for a secondary school student who is preparing for their A-levels, but for a primary school student, this may be excessive.

Homework needs to be exciting.

At home, the students should be given an opportunity to use the skills they learned in class. If homework is exactly the same as classwork, then students will quickly get bored and demotivated.

But if the quality of homework is up to par, then doing it will definitely benefit the child, improve their grades and open up a lot of doors for them. In fact, one American study which observed some students over the course of 16 years found that those students who regularly did their homework had better grades than those who did not.

Singapore is believed to have one of the best education systems on the planet . The educators pay attention to the quality of homework they give their students and make sure that the students really understand what they are doing and are not just parroting what they hear in class, so doing homework will benefit Singaporean students and help them build a better future for themselves.

A study also discovered that those students who did their homework on a regular basis got higher scores in Pisa. For example, Singaporean students took second place in the Pisa maths test in Pisa in 2012. The first place went to students from Shanghai.

As we have mentioned above, Chinese students devote more time to homework than anybody else in the world (approximately 13 hours per week). So, in these two examples, we can see a clear correlation between the number of hours the children spent doing relevant and actually beneficial homework and the success in the test.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Education (MOE) believes that for the upper-secondary students, 2 hours of homework a day is quite reasonable.

Parents are concerned about the amount of homework.

We should not forget that when a child has homework to do in many cases (especially if it is a young child), they are not doing it by themselves. Singaporean parents understand the benefits of having a good education, and many of them are actively involved in helping their children with their education.

Unfortunately, this means that they have to spend hours during the week monitoring and helping their children when they do homework.

And if a Singaporean has more than one child, they may not have any time left for themselves at all. As a result, many parents have expressed their displeasure at the amount of homework their children have to do during the day.

The Ministry of Education has taken steps to address their complaint. Now, instead of taking all of the homework home and doing it there, children may be able to stay at school and do part of their work there.

What do the opponents of homework say?

Despite high-quality homework having clear benefits, some people still believe that we are overdoing it and that this much homework is harmful to children.

Not all students are created equal. For most, 2 hours a day may be enough but those who struggle academically need to put in more hours just to keep up with their peers. This may lead to exhaustion, sleep deprivation, and stress . And that is if they decide to do it the honest way.

Some students who feel overwhelmed by their homework decide to find an easy way out and resort to cheating. If they get away with it, this is not a good lesson for them to learn. Thinking that you can cheat your way around a difficult obstacle is not the kind of mentality that will serve them well in the future.

Also, research shows that homework puts students from low-income families at a disadvantage . You may need something more than a cheap pen and a piece of paper to complete an assignment. Sometimes students need to use computers to look up information or create a digital presentation.

Wealthy students may also have access to a number of private tutors who may give them valuable advice about how to tackle the assignments in the best way possible. So, the grades students receive for their home assignments may not fully represent their intellectual capability all of the time.

Overall, homework is useful for children’s intellectual development. It has proven its worth in numerous studies, and it is unlikely to go anywhere anytime soon. Perhaps in the future, with the development of technology, the nature of home assignments will change, but the concept itself will remain.  

homework statistics in singapore

Tutor City's blog focuses on balancing informative and relevant content, never at the expense of providing an enriching read.  We want our readers to expand their horizons by learning more and find meaning to what they learn. Resident author - Mr Wee Ben Sen, has a wealth of experience in crafting articles to provide valuable insights in the field of private education. Ben Sen has also been running Tutor City, a leading home tuition agency in Singapore since 2010.

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The student news site of Bellaire High School

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The student news site of Bellaire High School

Students spend three times longer on homework than average, survey reveals

Sonya Kulkarni and Pallavi Gorantla | Jan 9, 2022

The+National+Education+Association+and+the+National+Parent+Teacher+Association+have+suggested+that+a+healthy+number+of+hours+that+students+should+be+spending+can+be+determined+by+the+10-minute+rule.+This+means+that+each+grade+level+should+have+a+maximum+homework+time+incrementing+by+10+minutes+depending+on+their+grade+level+%28for+instance%2C+ninth-graders+would+have+90+minutes+of+homework%2C+10th-graders+should+have+100+minutes%2C+and+so+on%29.

Graphic by Sonya Kulkarni

The National Education Association and the National Parent Teacher Association have suggested that a healthy number of hours that students should be spending can be determined by the “10-minute rule.” This means that each grade level should have a maximum homework time incrementing by 10 minutes depending on their grade level (for instance, ninth-graders would have 90 minutes of homework, 10th-graders should have 100 minutes, and so on).

As ‘finals week’ rapidly approaches, students not only devote effort to attaining their desired exam scores but make a last attempt to keep or change the grade they have for semester one by making up homework assignments.

High schoolers reported doing an average of 2.7 hours of homework per weeknight, according to a study by the Washington Post from 2018 to 2020 of over 50,000 individuals. A survey of approximately 200 Bellaire High School students revealed that some students spend over three times this number.

The demographics of this survey included 34 freshmen, 43 sophomores, 54 juniors and 54 seniors on average.

When asked how many hours students spent on homework in a day on average, answers ranged from zero to more than nine with an average of about four hours. In contrast, polled students said that about one hour of homework would constitute a healthy number of hours.

Junior Claire Zhang said she feels academically pressured in her AP schedule, but not necessarily by the classes.

“The class environment in AP classes can feel pressuring because everyone is always working hard and it makes it difficult to keep up sometimes.” Zhang said.

A total of 93 students reported that the minimum grade they would be satisfied with receiving in a class would be an A. This was followed by 81 students, who responded that a B would be the minimum acceptable grade. 19 students responded with a C and four responded with a D.

“I am happy with the classes I take, but sometimes it can be very stressful to try to keep up,” freshman Allyson Nguyen said. “I feel academically pressured to keep an A in my classes.”

Up to 152 students said that grades are extremely important to them, while 32 said they generally are more apathetic about their academic performance.

Last year, nine valedictorians graduated from Bellaire. They each achieved a grade point average of 5.0. HISD has never seen this amount of valedictorians in one school, and as of now there are 14 valedictorians.

“I feel that it does degrade the title of valedictorian because as long as a student knows how to plan their schedule accordingly and make good grades in the classes, then anyone can be valedictorian,” Zhang said.

Bellaire offers classes like physical education and health in the summer. These summer classes allow students to skip the 4.0 class and not put it on their transcript. Some electives also have a 5.0 grade point average like debate.

Close to 200 students were polled about Bellaire having multiple valedictorians. They primarily answered that they were in favor of Bellaire having multiple valedictorians, which has recently attracted significant acclaim .

Senior Katherine Chen is one of the 14 valedictorians graduating this year and said that she views the class of 2022 as having an extraordinary amount of extremely hardworking individuals.

“I think it was expected since freshman year since most of us knew about the others and were just focused on doing our personal best,” Chen said.

Chen said that each valedictorian achieved the honor on their own and deserves it.

“I’m honestly very happy for the other valedictorians and happy that Bellaire is such a good school,” Chen said. “I don’t feel any less special with 13 other valedictorians.”

Nguyen said that having multiple valedictorians shows just how competitive the school is.

“It’s impressive, yet scary to think about competing against my classmates,” Nguyen said.

Offering 30 AP classes and boasting a significant number of merit-based scholars Bellaire can be considered a competitive school.

“I feel academically challenged but not pressured,” Chen said. “Every class I take helps push me beyond my comfort zone but is not too much to handle.”

Students have the opportunity to have off-periods if they’ve met all their credits and are able to maintain a high level of academic performance. But for freshmen like Nguyen, off periods are considered a privilege. Nguyen said she usually has an hour to five hours worth of work everyday.

“Depending on the day, there can be a lot of work, especially with extra curriculars,” Nguyen said. “Although, I am a freshman, so I feel like it’s not as bad in comparison to higher grades.”

According to the survey of Bellaire students, when asked to evaluate their agreement with the statement “students who get better grades tend to be smarter overall than students who get worse grades,” responders largely disagreed.

Zhang said that for students on the cusp of applying to college, it can sometimes be hard to ignore the mental pressure to attain good grades.

“As a junior, it’s really easy to get extremely anxious about your GPA,” Zhang said. “It’s also a very common but toxic practice to determine your self-worth through your grades but I think that we just need to remember that our mental health should also come first. Sometimes, it’s just not the right day for everyone and one test doesn’t determine our smartness.”

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The student news site of Bellaire High School

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Anonymous • Nov 21, 2023 at 10:32 am

It’s not really helping me understand how much.

josh • May 9, 2023 at 9:58 am

Kassie • May 6, 2022 at 12:29 pm

Im using this for an English report. This is great because on of my sources needed to be from another student. Homework drives me insane. Im glad this is very updated too!!

Kaylee Swaim • Jan 25, 2023 at 9:21 pm

I am also using this for an English report. I have to do an argumentative essay about banning homework in schools and this helps sooo much!

Izzy McAvaney • Mar 15, 2023 at 6:43 pm

I am ALSO using this for an English report on cutting down school days, homework drives me insane!!

E. Elliott • Apr 25, 2022 at 6:42 pm

I’m from Louisiana and am actually using this for an English Essay thanks for the information it was very informative.

Nabila Wilson • Jan 10, 2022 at 6:56 pm

Interesting with the polls! I didn’t realize about 14 valedictorians, that’s crazy.

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COVID-19 SPECIAL

Home-based learning: what have we learnt from the great hbl experiment.

homework statistics in singapore

SINGAPORE - As students of all levels returned to school this past week, it was announced that home-based learning (HBL) is here to stay.

Education Minister Ong Ye Kung said recently that online learning is set to become routine, suggesting that HBL could be held once a fortnight, for starters.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic , HBL was rolled out nationwide after schools shut in April.

After the circuit breaker to stem the spread of Covid-19 ended on June 1, most students in primary and secondary schools alternated between being physically in school and HBL, on a weekly basis, for a month.

Now that the weekly rotation is over, it is timely to assess what lessons were learnt from the big HBL experiment and its chief benefits that can also be reaped in the physical classroom.

Educators interviewed by The Straits Times say virtual and classroom learning are two distinct beasts, but there are useful synergies between the two, which, when combined, could lead to students having a more enriching learning experience.

Here are the five lessons to draw on.

1. CROSSOVER LESSONS

Many of the innovative approaches teachers employed during HBL last month can already be translated into a classroom, says Dr Teo Chew Lee from the Office of Education Research at National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University Singapore.

She recounts a physics experiment where the teacher asked Secondary 1 students to build a catapult using ice-cream sticks, bottle caps and rubber bands at home. Photos and videos were taken and uploaded.

This led to wide-ranging discussions on energy conversion, renewable energy and real-world problems like power shortages faced by some African schools.

Dr Teo says the same lesson can be replicated in the classroom, but perhaps made more open-ended and more seamless, by incorporating messaging features similar to group WhatsApp chats, which can include discussions before or after the lesson. This is so that even after the lesson ends, the learning continues.

2. RECORDED LESSONS ON TAP

Having recorded lessons during online learning means this resource can be used by students for review and revision at any time, says Mr Rum Tan, director of SmileTutor, a home tuition agency.

He says: "I believe one of the weaknesses of traditional classroom learning is that students are all by themselves once they get home. They have no one to assist them in their learning, so they turn to tutors.

"The key idea here is to provide students with instant access to the learning materials and guidance in the form of pre-recorded lessons."

So if a student wants to learn about statistics, for example, he can access the relevant tutorial online and take as long as he needs to ingest it.

3. HOMEWORK BY VIDEO

The uploading of video and audio recordings, which were commonly used during HBL, could be a different way of submitting homework, says Dr Nicholas Duggan, principal of Invictus Family, the virtual extension of Invictus International School.

Inspired by the lockdown worldwide, the virtual campus, which will be launched next month, will offer full-time home-based learning.

Dr Duggan says: "Not every child can communicate his or her work well or speak well, such as some students with dyslexia."

Using videos or audio footage to talk about their work may help some children become more confident speakers, he says.

4. PARENTS HELPING TEACHERS

During the circuit breaker, parents monitored their children doing HBL.

Such close observation meant that "parents were forced to look at how their kids learn and they can better communicate that to their children's teachers", says Mrs Pamela Lim, founder of All Gifted High School, a private school.

For example, parents may have noticed that their child is a kinaesthetic learner, who learns more quickly with hands-on experiments and manipulatives, compared with others who prefer the more auditory form of learning that dominates in classroom settings, she says.

Teachers are generally keen to work closely with parents and such feedback can help the teacher offer the child more targeted assistance.

5. GAMIFICATION WORKS

Video-conferencing tools, commonly used during the stay-in period because of Covid-19, can be a boon for shy kids.

Mrs JoBeth Williams, head of English at Cherrr, an online learning platform that offers live-streamed tuition lessons, says: "With HBL, I get kids who are more excited to raise their hands. They want to speak and like to see their faces blown up onscreen.

"It's a lot more freeing for them as it doesn't feel like 40 other people are watching them."

The former teacher says her mini quizzes online, where she gives out "virtual trophies", are a hit.

A similar interactive points reward system can be used in primary-school classrooms, she suggests.

Mr David Squires, who teaches English at British Council Singapore, has found that gamification - which has elements of game-playing, like scoring points and competing with others - is very motivating for his students.

Quiz-based game platforms like Kahoot! also have the benefit of giving him "instant feedback" on which questions his students found particularly difficult.

Such games can be played on interactive whiteboards, which he uses in his classroom.

Looking back on the HBL experiment, he found it rewarding how quickly many teachers and students mastered the technology required for virtual lessons.

Another thing that struck him was "how much the connection between the teacher and students means".

"I always looked forward to seeing my own students online and my daughters, who are in Primary 4 and 6, had teachers who made a video for the children."

"The compassion and empathy is the same, whether it is online or face to face."

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54 Work From Home Statistics You Should Know

Working from laptop on a bench

Remote work used to be a mere blip on our radar, available to (and desired by) only a minority of the labour force.

Now, more than a year since the COVID-19 outbreak, something that seemed temporary seems likely to stay.

The pandemic accelerated us into a digital economy, making it more necessary than ever to rethink the way we do work.

Here’s the data to back that up, including:

  • Statistics on work from home productivity levels
  • The pros and cons of working from home (in both quantitative and qualitative data)
  • 2020-2021 work from home statistics for Asia
  • How ready the world is for remote work, infrastructure-wise
  • How the pandemic has impacted the digital gig economy
  • The future of work

Read also: What’s the Future of Remote Work in Singapore?

Work from Home Productivity Statistics

1. During the lockdown, knowledge workers spent 12% less time in large (and tedious) meetings and 9% more time interacting with clients and external partners. ( Harvard Business Review )

2. The lockdown helped more knowledge workers take responsibility for their own schedules. They reported finishing 50% more work tasks — tasks they chose because they saw the activities as important. ( Harvard Business Review )

3. The pandemic helped knowledge workers re-evaluate their priorities, leading them to spend more time on worthwhile activities and less on “tiresome tasks.” The number of tasks rated tiresome dropped from 27% to 12%, and the number of tasks offloaded on others dropped from 41% to 27%. ( Harvard Business Review )

4. On the same note, knowledge workers took more control of their work hours during the lockdown. They were 89.5% more likely to make time for work that they viewed as important, and 69.2% less likely to do something that a colleague asked them to. ( Harvard Business Review )

5. During the lockdown, knowledge workers reported their work was “more important, less tiresome, less easily delegated, and contribute[d] to the company’s objectives.” They were also more likely to view themselves as important contributors. ( Harvard Business Review )

6. 51% of employees report being more productive working from home, while 15% report being less productive. The remainder report that there’s been no difference. ( Qualtrics )

7. 55% of managers believe their direct reports have been more productive, while 16% believe they’ve been less productive. ( Qualtrics )

8. The lack of a commute, improved focus, flexible schedules, and more privacy were the top reasons cited for improved productivity while working from home. ( Qualtrics )

The Pros and Cons of Working from Home

9. Over half of all employees (53%) say their organisation’s purpose resonates with them now more than before the pandemic. ( Qualtrics )

10. Employees are twice as likely to say that their personal well-being has improved since the pandemic. ( Qualtrics )

11. If everybody able to work from home worldwide did so for just one day a week, it would cut annual global oil consumption by 1% for road passenger transport. Carbon emissions would drop by 24 million tonnes per year. ( International Energy Agency )

12. Globally, air pollution from road traffic dropped significantly during the COVID-19 lockdowns. One of the steepest was in New Delhi, which saw a two-thirds reduction in nitrogen dioxide. ( International Energy Agency )

13. A typical employer can save roughly $11,000 per year for every person who works remotely half the time. ( Global Workplace Analytics )

14. Employees can save between $2,500 and $4,000 a year if they work remotely half the time — and more if they move to a cheaper area and work remotely full-time. ( Global Workplace Analytics )

15. Seven in 10 Singaporeans reported that working from home has improved their mental health. ( The Straits Times )

Read also: 9 Part Time Jobs You Can Do From Home in Singapore

Work from Home Statistics in Asia

16. 91% of teams in Asia-Pacific have implemented work from home arrangements since the COVID-19 outbreak. ( Gartner )

17. Based on the robustness of the country’s digital infrastructure, Singapore and South Korea rank among the countries most prepared for remote work. Indonesia, India, Philippines, and Thailand are among the most ill-prepared. ( Harvard Business Review )

homework statistics in singapore

18. The ability to work from home is highly correlated with well-paid occupations and the digital infrastructure of the country. For example, only 5.5% of workers in Ghana could work from home compared to 23% in Yunnan, China. ( Saltiel, 2020 )

19. In Singapore, the most common complaints about working from home include working longer hours, doing work outside their usual hours, distractions from children and family, and the difficulty of convincing their supervisors of their productivity. ( The Straits Times )

20. In Malaysia, employees able to work from home were largely in highly-paid sectors such as finance, insurance, science, and communications. These well-compensated jobs totalled less than a third of Malaysia’s workforce in 2019. ( London School of Economics )

21. In India, remote work is the norm for housewives looking to supplement their income. Many do data entry or online retail from their homes. Because these are typically low-paying jobs, there’s a stigma against working from home. For Indians, the office is the place of more prestigious and higher-paid work rather than the standard. ( Raconteur )

22. Vietnam has a small but growing class of professionals freelancing from home, providing services like computer programming, design, and translation. Young, tech-savvy Vietnamese are leading the charge in more widespread adoption of remote work. ( Raconteur )

23. In Indonesia, 40% worked entirely from home during the pandemic. Young tech-savvy professionals, in particular, preferred to return to their hometowns and work remotely instead of living in big cities. ( Indonesian Statistics Agency BPS )

24. 38% of Vietnamese reported being productive when working from home, while 16% reported being very productive. Only 8% report not being very productive. This further supports the shifting mentality in favour of remote work. ( Statista )

25. 20% of Thai companies have permanently shifted to working from home. ( PwC Thailand )

26. Only 35-40% of Filipinos secure a job of any kind after graduation. Barely 10% get a job in the field they studied. Freelance work opens up a world of opportunity for Filipinos, who face high levels of stress from work and daily commutes. ( Manila Bulletin , ABS-CBN News )

27. In Singapore, eight in 10 workers prefer to work from home or have flexible employment. Only one in 10 wanted to return to the office full-time. ( The Straits Times )

28. Singaporean employees are cautious about returning to the workplace, with most citing the risks of taking public transport, exposure to the virus, and having to wear a mask in the office. ( The Straits Times )

The Global Shift to Digital Infrastructure

29. Singapore, Canada, Germany, and the Netherlands are among the highest-rated for the resilience of their internet infrastructure against traffic spikes. ( Harvard Business Review )

30. Singapore and the Netherlands also ranked well for the robustness of their digital platforms, though the proliferation of digital payment systems isn’t as high in Singapore. ( Harvard Business Review )

31. Comparatively, the United States is decently prepared for work-from-home arrangements, but more work needs to be done on strengthening its infrastructure. Poorer and rural areas tend to have less access to connectivity, while broadband fees are among the highest in the world because of the lack of competition. ( Harvard Business Review )

32. India has the least resilient internet infrastructure for handling traffic surges. The proliferation of digital payment systems is also low, but that’s partially because internet penetration isn’t uniform across the country. ( Harvard Business Review )

33. China’s use of digital payment systems is widespread thanks to apps such as Weixin/WeChat. However, it does not rank as highly on the resilience of its internet infrastructure and the robustness of digital platforms. This is likely because a substantial percentage of China’s population lives in rural, lower-income regions. ( Harvard Business Review )

34. China is investing $3.8 trillion dollars in infrastructure to position itself as a high-tech powerhouse after the pandemic. The investment will cover aspects such as 5G, IoT, big data, artificial intelligence, and innovative infrastructure. ( Computer Weekly )

35. Internet penetration in Indonesia is low, but its digital denizens are among the world’s most active. Embracing digitisation can grow the country’s GDP by USD150 billion (10%) by 2025. ( McKinsey )

The Rise of the Gig Economy

36. Nine in 10 Singaporean employees believe they need to reskill or upskill to remain competitive in the job market. This belief was particularly prevalent among those aged 56 to 65 years old. ( UOB )

37. Almost nine in 10 Singaporeans believe that after the pandemic, companies will prefer candidates who can perform multiple roles or turn to digitisation to reduce costs. ( UOB )

38. Two-thirds of major companies use freelancers to lower their labour costs. ( Forbes )

39. In March 2020, more than half of gig workers had lost their jobs. The remaining gig economy workers had lost two-thirds of their income. ( Fairwork Foundation )

40. During the lockdown, over a quarter of workers in the gig economy reported having more work than usual. ( Blundell et al., 2020 )

41. The pandemic provided a boost to gig economy sectors such as grocery delivery, restaurant food delivery, banking and investment, software programming, and healthcare. It had a negative effect on ride-sharing, home rentals, babysitting, and jobs requiring physical labour. ( KPMG )

homework statistics in singapore

42. COVID-19 accelerated the shift to a digital economy, providing a boon to gig and freelance workers. Before the pandemic, the digital gig economy grew steadily at 17% CAGR, reaching 296 billion dollars in 2020. It’s projected to hit 455 billion dollars in 2023. ( Mastercard )

43. Analysts project that there will be 915 million freelancers around the world by 2023, an 18.8% increase from the 770 million in 2018. There’s also likely to be 78 million global gig workers by 2023 (+81.4% since 2018). ( Mastercard )

Statistics on the Future of Work

44. It’s estimated that around 20% of jobs globally could be done from home. ( Boeri et al. , Brynjolfsson et al. , Eurostat , Saltiel )

45. A majority of CEO respondents expect remote work to have a lasting impact post-pandemic. ( PwC CEO Panel Su r vey )

46. 48% of companies worldwide now have distributed workforces, compared to 30% pre-pandemic. Distributed work means there’s no central location to work remotely from; instead, the entire workforce is distributed around the world. This has significant implications for the future of organisations after the pandemic passes. ( Statista )

47. In the UK, 73% of knowledge workers want flexible employment even after the pandemic is over. The average employee wants to work from home for two-thirds of the week and the remaining third in the office. ( Claromentis )

48. In Singapore, four in 10 employees want hybrid working arrangements — the ability to split their working hours between home and the office — and a little more than four in 10 want to continue working from home. ( The Straits Times )

49. Unfortunately, about five in 10 Singaporean employees feel they would be penalised by their workplaces if they expressed a preference for working from home. ( The Straits Times )

50. Thai companies are more likely to outsource work to skilled freelancers with the ongoing pandemic. This will help cut costs and create more flexibility in labour management. ( PwC Thailand )

51. 74% of millennials don’t want to go back to the office full-time. 65% of Gen Xers and 58% of baby boomers would also like to continue working from home as much as possible after the pandemic. ( Gallup )

52. According to one survey, 53% of its respondents said they would consider staying at their organisations longer if there were a long-term remote work policy. 10% would quit if they were forced back into the office full-time. ( Qualtrics )

53. 80% of those looking for new jobs said it was important that their next jobs offered the opportunity to live and work from anywhere. ( Qualtrics )

54. 70% of managers prefer hybrid working arrangements compared to 59% of individual contributors. ( Qualtrics )

Here are 5 Math Homework Help Apps in Singapore

Here are 5 Math Homework Help Apps in Singapore

With the sheer number of tuition centres and tuition agencies out there that provide parents with a host of tuition options for their children, it’s easy to think that tuition is always a good idea—perhaps even the best solution that one can think of when it comes to helping their child cope with academic challenges or to simply boost their performance in school. This is not the case, however, as recent years have seen the rise of a new breed of technology that aims to cater to Singapore’s competitive education system. Challenging and now changing the way parents and students perceive and use tuition, online homework apps have quickly become the new go-to solution of students who find themselves struggling with homework in challenging subjects such as math.

Students struggle with homework

With Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics or STEM education being especially challenging in Singapore, parents have long sought for ways to make the academic burden easier on their children. From enrolment in tuition centres to finding a suitable private tutor to involving their child in after-school enrichment programs, Singaporean parents have always been on the lookout for practical solutions to their children’s academic woes, specifically, to their frequent encounters with difficult homework questions or problems that are too tough for their school level.

With the growing use of social media platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp, smart parents (who sometimes fondly refer to themselves as “kiasu parents,” kiasu being a cultural thing in Singapore which means “fear of losing out” and can be anything from positive to negative, depending on the context) have found a way to make dealing with challenging homework less daunting. This is through crowdsourcing or asking questions to a group or a community that share a common interest. In Singapore where parents’ concern over various areas of their child’s education never seem to end—from PSLE sample problems, to understanding the Singapore Maths Model Method, to the best O-Level preparation for their child in Year 11—countless Facebook groups on these topics exist in large numbers and at present continue being created. This new way of connecting comes as great relief to parents because finally, they can have the help and support of a like-minded community of people who express similar concerns over their child’s education. More importantly, it provides them the convenience of being able to ask fellow parents about any question related to their topic of common interest—homework problems included.

With these, parents started creating groups and forums that are solely dedicated to asking math questions. Usually posted in these groups and forums are snapshots of tough questions or sample problems, especially in math (mostly from homework, or, during Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE)-taking season, extremely difficult math questions that have broke down test-takers) that both students and parents cannot answer. Students can point their fingers on a number of factors—teacher didn’t explain the math concept too well; not enough examples were provided; large class number or poor student-to-teacher ratio thus reduced chances of retention and comprehension on the student’s part; etc.—while parents can blame the Ministry of Education’s (MOE) math syllabus being too difficult or themselves for not having been exposed to advanced math lessons during their time, yet it will all boil down to an unsolved homework problem and a ticking clock that will signal “Time’s up!” once the school day has ended.

And so, Singapore’s educational technology (edtech) industry has their work cut out for them. Luckily enough, a number of start-ups have noticed the occurrence of such behind-the-scenes struggle of parents and students when it comes to math homework problems that seem to intimidate the child rather than encourage him. And, luckily enough, Singapore’s bright edtech start-ups saw that this struggle is something that not even the billion-dollar tuition industry can grapple with.

The rise of homework apps

Given the classic after-school conundrum of students grappling with homework, a number of edtech start-ups in Singapore have been working in recent years to fill this gap in the country’s education sector in order to deliver a new kind of service: online homework assistance.

Past technological developments in e-learning have brought the education sector valuable learning tools such as Massive Open Online Courses or MOOCs that prove to be useful in distant and adult learning; databases that catalog questions asked by students, and then answered by tutors or experts and then posted online to allow viewing by users and works as a reference site; online math testing sites that have a database of questions and answers, which students can use by taking practice drills and tests as most of these sites allow graded practice tests; and, more recently, live one-to-one online tuition that allows real-time tutorial in a virtual classroom that simulates a classroom setup. Online homework apps come as the latest addition to these innovations by Singapore’s educational technology sector.

Most of these apps are community-sourced platforms and work through crowdsourcing, which means answer or solutions to math problems are provided on-demand by users of the app or its community—math teachers, tutors, or even students themselves. Some are powered by advanced technological innovations such as artificial intelligence or AI, machine learning, and the use of highly sophisticated algorithms. Whatever the case may be, we have rounded up some of the most widely-used math homework apps in the country (with some even extending patronage outside of Singapore). Along with it are some basic information about these apps and how to use them so parents can learn more about these seemingly miracle solutions to their child’s homework woes.

1.  Ask.ManyTutors

homework statistics in singapore

Founded in 2016 by Lai Weichang and Jason Tan—co-founder and chief technical officer, respectively—of Singapore tuition agency ManyTutors, Ask.ManyTutors is an app that makes it possible for students in the Primary Level, Secondary Level, Junior College Level, and International Baccalaureate Programs to ask a tutor homework questions 24/7. Ask.ManyTutors allows its users, usually students and parents, to ask any Singapore Maths or Science-related homework questions by taking a photo of the question using one’s camera phone and posting it to be answered by the agency's base of 45,000 tutors. Users can also provide answers to questions that other students or users find difficult. The app promises answers in as short as 15 minutes to a few hours.

The app works for students in Singapore as well as those in the USA who study Singapore Math.

How it works:  The app works in three easy steps. First, users need to take a photo of their challenging math homework question, and then select the level and the subject, which in this case is math. Next, users need to type in required information (such as their email address), and then click submit. Once the math problem has been submitted, users need to wait for 15 minutes to a few hours to be provided with answers, which will be sent to them through their email.

Upside: Provides a quick and easy math homework option free of charge

Downside: Problems usually take a while to be solved, averaging 2-3 hours, as seen on Ask.ManyTutors website

2.  Miao

homework statistics in singapore

Founded in 2016 by young entrepreneur and CEO Betty Zhou together with her team of collaborators, Miao dubs itself as “Your AI Homework Helper.” Its maker, Miao Academy , is an artificial intelligence (AI) company that aims to revolutionise the way students learn and access educational resources. Their math homework app, Miao, offers help to students in the Primary 6 Level to Junior College Level in need of assistance with STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) subjects.

Aside from users in Singapore, Miao is also used by students in the secondary and tertiary levels in the US and in the UK.

How it works:  The app allows users to snap and upload a photo of a maths question. However, unlike popular math homework apps that directly provide students with solutions by generating specific answers to specific math questions, Miao only searches math problems that are similar and related to the question submitted by a student. These sample problems offered by Miao come with answers and workings, so that students can learn to solve their own homework using the samples provided. By using natural language processing algorithms, Miao analyzes a submitted question or problem and presents similar practice questions and other information related to it (in as fast as 10 seconds) with the help of learning materials such as articles or videos to aid in the understanding of the math concepts behind each question.

Upside: Promotes independent learning by giving students a “push” in the right direction by providing sample problems similar to the one submitted, as opposed to directly giving a solution

Downside: Not ideal for direct homework help as actual answers or solutions are not provided

3.  Queri

homework statistics in singapore

“Ask and Learn, Answer and Earn”—this is Queri’ s motto. Founded in 2016, this homework app provides homework solutions by allowing its users to crowdsource the answers to difficult math questions. With is revolutionised use of on-demand peer-to-peer assistance, Queri aims to give students an opportunity to help out their peers and earn from it if they consistently give out accurate help to those who need it.

How it works:  By   registering and logging in to a Queri account, the app allows its users to do mainly two things:

For those who seek homework help, Queri allows users to post questions either by typing it into a text box or taking a snapshot of it. With over 22 topics, the app allows users to list questions under a wide range of academic subjects and areas, including mathematics, chemistry and physics. At present, the app’s most popular category is mathematics in the primary and secondary level. Most questions posted are answered within five minutes to half an hour.

For those who seek to help out others with their tough homework, users can do so by providing an answer in text or photo. If they are the first user to do so, they will earn credits, ($1 for each credit, which can be withdrawn to a PayPal account).

Upside: Allows exchange of information between students; Students with advanced math skills are incentivized by earning

Downside:  There is the possibility of getting incorrect answers

4.  Snapask

homework statistics in singapore

Founded in 2015, Snapask is a Hong Kong-based online learning website that offers tutoring services to students living in Hong Kong, Singapore, and neighboring Asian countries. Students could also ask questions and tutors would answer them

How it works: Students can simply snap a photo of their question, post it on the app, and, once a tutor (from their pool of 200+ tutors) has received the question, they will be provided with the answers and the steps to the solution via private chat message.

Upside:  Provides quick and easy solution

Downside:  Pool of tutors doesn’t necessarily mean qualified or expert tutors

5.  iMath

homework statistics in singapore

iMath is a tech-enabled human-centric platform that aims to help students with their homework and enhance their learning by using technology to bring quality learning and caring coaching to any student anytime, anywhere. With the ease of use and the endless possibilities that the Internet provides, iMath desires to give every deserving student the help and assistance that he or she deserves from a nurturing community of math experts and enthusiasts.

How it works: By registering and logging in to their iMath account, users get free and convenient access to iMath’s Community Wall . This bulletin board, where members of the iMath community who seek help and seek to lend a helping hand gather and meet—allows students and parents to simply post a snapshot of a difficult math homework and get answers and detailed workings from tutors, parents, or from other students as well. By allowing students and parents to help out, too, iMath makes for a homework app that doesn’t just generate answers but one that makes genuine exchange of information possible.

Upside: Provides quick and quality answers to your quick math questions with the help of a supportive and nurturing math community

Downside: Not a question-and-answer marketplace

So, for an all-around homework saviour for parents and students who find themselves stumped with tough math problems, try iMath today! Download the iMath app here.

This article was written by Louise O. Lopez

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homework statistics in singapore

COMMENTS

  1. Singapore ranks third globally in time spent on homework

    Dec 25, 2014, 9:22 AM SGT Students in Singapore are among the world's most hard- working at home, clocking the third-longest time spent on homework, a report released this month has found. The...

  2. Countries Who Spend the Most Time Doing Homework

    The results showed that in Shanghai, China the students had the highest number of hours of homework with 13.8 hours per week. Russia followed, where students had an average of 9.7 hours of homework per week. Finland had the least amount of homework hours with 2.8 hours per week, followed closely by South Korea with 2.9 hours.

  3. Singapore students spend third-highest amount of time on homework: study

    Fifteen-year-old students in Singapore said they spent an average of 9.4 hours a week on homework, according to the results of a survey by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and...

  4. Education GPS

    The time spent on homework per day in a typical school week in Singapore is long compared to the other OECD and partner countries/economies. (2 Hours, rank 6/80 , 2022) Download Indicator Singapore has one of the largest differences in mathematics performance associated with a one-hour increase in the time spent doing homework in mathematics ...

  5. Education in Singapore

    Current statistics on this topic Educational Institutions & Market Government total expenditure on education in Singapore FY 2012-2022 Education Level & Skills Highest education qualification...

  6. Associations of time spent on homework or studying with ...

    Total 1225 adolescents aged 13-19 years. Measurements Self-reported sleep behavior and time use data were collected separately for school days and weekends. Multiple regression models were used to test covariation of time spent on homework/studying with other activities, and associations of homework/studying duration with depression symptoms.

  7. Students in these countries spend the most time doing homework

    In the individual schools in some regions—Hong Kong, Japan, Macao, and Singapore—that earned the highest math scores (pdf, pg. 5) in 2012, students saw an increase of 17 score points or more ...

  8. PDF A3 P new

    Singapore. On average, students in Finland and Germany spend only . 12and11hours, respectively, per week on out-of-school study. IS MORE BETTER? Because students in Singapore devote so much time to out-of-school study, it makes sense to askwhether this translates to better academic performance. I investigated the relationship

  9. How home-based learning shows up inequality in Singapore

    April 18, 2020 at 12:00 PM. SINGAPORE - With schools closed and online learning in full swing, fault lines in the digital space have begun to emerge in the harsh light of the pandemic. Since April ...

  10. Mathematics Homework: a Study of Three Grade Eight Classrooms in Singapore

    This paper explores the nature and source of mathematics homework and teachers' and students' perspectives about the role of mathematics homework. The subjects of the study are three grade 8 mathematics teachers and 115 of their students. Data from field notes, teacher interviews and student questionnaire are analysed using qualitative methods. The findings show that all 3 teachers gave ...

  11. Large-scale survey of S'pore undergrads finds work and study

    SINGAPORE — Almost 90 per cent of undergraduates here said that work and study commitments were their greatest source of stress, a survey on mental health conducted by a network of university...

  12. Singapore Department of Statistics (DOS)

    08 Feb 2024 2023 Economic Survey of Singapore will be released on 15 Feb 2024 at 8.00 am.. PDF (199KB) Households 07 Feb 2024 Median Household Income from Work Grew in 2023. PDF (118KB) Industry 05 Feb 2024

  13. 3 in 4 Singapore students fear failure, higher than global ...

    Updated December 3, 2019. SINGAPORE — Singapore students are among those who are most afraid of failure, a study by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has found. In ...

  14. Homework In Singapore

    In Singapore, the general guideline for time spent on homework is about 30 minutes to an hour for Primary 1-2 students, 1-1.5 hour for Primary 3 and 4 students and 1.5-2 hours for Primary 5 and 6 students. Nevertheless, each school will tell you that it varies from student to student and that the above applies to the average student.

  15. Does Homework Help Students in Singapore Learn Better?

    This means Singapore's schools are doing something right! Research has shown that homework does help a child's ability to learn on their own, grasp concepts better and improve their problem solving skills. The idea is to provide the right kind of 'high quality' homework as opposed to huge quantities of random assignments to complete ...

  16. 11 Surprising Homework Statistics, Facts & Data (2024)

    Homework Statistics List 1. 45% of Parents think Homework is Too Easy for their Children A study by the Center for American Progress found that parents are almost twice as likely to believe their children's homework is too easy than to disagree with that statement. Here are the figures for math homework:

  17. Is doing homework really useful? A Singaporean's Viewpoint

    It is also noteworthy that the global average for doing homework is around five hours, so Singaporean students are definitely working hard. This report was based on the results of a questionnaire given out by the OECD to 15-year-olds. Approximately 510,000 students took part in the test. They had to give answers regarding the environment in ...

  18. Students spend three times longer on homework than average, survey

    High schoolers reported doing an average of 2.7 hours of homework per weeknight, according to a study by the Washington Post from 2018 to 2020 of over 50,000 individuals. A survey of approximately 200 Bellaire High School students revealed that some students spend over three times this number. The demographics of this survey included 34 ...

  19. Home-based learning: What have we learnt from the great HBL experiment?

    Published. Jul 4, 2020, 2:00 PM SGT. SINGAPORE - As students of all levels returned to school this past week, it was announced that home-based learning (HBL) is here to stay. Education Minister ...

  20. 54 Work From Home Statistics You Should Know

    The future of work Read also: What's the Future of Remote Work in Singapore? Work from Home Productivity Statistics 1. During the lockdown, knowledge workers spent 12% less time in large (and tedious) meetings and 9% more time interacting with clients and external partners. ( Harvard Business Review) 2.

  21. 3Heart-warming Stories Of Homework Statistics In Singapore

    In Singapore, the general guideline for time spent on homework is about 30 minutes to an hour for Primary 1-2 students, 1-1.com for years. It is by far the best statistics homework help I have received.We have custom-made our Statistics Assignment Help means as per the familiarity we had with our scholars and their psychological state of mind.

  22. iMath

    Downside: Not ideal for direct homework help as actual answers or solutions are not provided. 3. Queri. "Ask and Learn, Answer and Earn"—this is Queri' s motto. Founded in 2016, this homework app provides homework solutions by allowing its users to crowdsource the answers to difficult math questions.